T Nation

Fish: Canned vs Non-Canned

Just read the article “The Simple Diet” by Tim Henriques. In the article he mentions to eat fish at least twice a week but not canned. Since i can’t access the livespill feed to ask the author im hoping someone here could give me an answer as to why.

Thanks.

I think with some cans the metallic material can get into your food which inst good. Other than that maybe canned food is made mostly with farm raised fish? If that’s the case farm raised fish are no better than factory produced beef in that the fish are poorly fed and tend to have high levels of mercury and less omega 3 and other fatty acids.

Similarly interested to hear from the article’s author, or MODOK, or someone else trustworthy.

You can find wild caught fish in cans, but often times the can will contain BPA… google BPA to see the host of hormonal issues that it can cause

He didn’t say you shouldn’t eat canned fish, he said you don’t get to count that toward the two serving per week recommendation. I got the idea he wants things as close to the natural state as possible.

I asked Tim in the livespill.

@ld13 - two main negatives with canned stuff. I just read something last night about the protein scores for canned fish being way lower than their fresh counterparts. Second, anytime something has been dead for a long time it is likely to lose phytonutrients. Go deep sea fishing and have sushi/sashimi 5 minutes after you have caught a fish and you can taste the difference. Compare the color of canned peas to frozen or fresh ones, similar idea. When in doubt go for fresh and natural”

Now, I’m guessing the phytonutrients part doesn’t really apply since those are in plants…

As other people said, make sure the can doesn’t have a plastic lining (BPA). It’s pretty easy to find it without a lining. It’s also pretty easy to tell if the fish was wild caught or not as it will usually say, at least for salmon. I eat almost all canned fish just because it is cheaper, and you can’t really get some of it fresh or even frozen. I eat salmon, anchovies, sardines, and oysters. I’d be interested to learn about whether the non-salmon stuff is farm raised or wild caught, it if it really matters, especially for the oysters (they are nutritious as hell).

Is this also true for tuna too? Someone just told me tuna is better for you in the packages than in the cans? I’m a bit skeptical because I haven’t heard this before.

[quote]MODOK wrote:

[quote]jehovasfitness wrote:
You can find wild caught fish in cans, but often times the can will contain BPA… google BPA to see the host of hormonal issues that it can cause[/quote]

Well, it goes without saying to avoid BPA. All of my cans of fish here in TN have said “BPA free” for a while now.
[/quote]

I didn’t realize till maybe a month ago that cans even contained BPA. Who would think tin cans would have a plastic lining. Then again, I don’t buy many canned foods.

[quote]Id13 wrote:

Now, I’m guessing the phytonutrients part doesn’t really apply since those are in plants…
[/quote]

Astaxanthin, the compound giving salmon their characteristic hue, is a phytonutrient.

Yeah, fresh salmon is definitely better, but when I can get 14 oz of wild alaskan salmon for 2.99 at Trader Joes…no contest for this guy.