First GHR Attempt

I tried to do a glute ham raise for the first time yesterday, and I was able to do several. This surprised me because I’m not that strong and I definitely can’t even do one on the floor. So, I must be doing them wrong.

I’ve read that your thighs should be on the pad, a few inches above the knee and you should kind of push through your toes, and keep back straight. I tried to do all of those, but it didn’t feel right.

When in the upright position, what part of the leg should be in contact with the pad?
Is it normal to feel like I’m going to fall off of the darn thing? :slight_smile:

Check this exercise description out: http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/Hamstrings/WTGluteHamRaise.html

I find them easier than doing them on the floor. The pivot is part way up the thigh rather than at the knee so they should be easier.

Stu

The “natural” ghr on the floor is waaay more difficult than using the actual equipment. I think most people can at least do a few there first time. My first time I did 14

Natural GHRs also provide less ROM. You can’t train the hip extension function of the hamstring unless you do them off a platform.

Damn, I wish I had a GHR machine…

Make one f00 :stuck_out_tongue: Can’t be that hard.

thanks guys!

I tried them again after doing a little more research on form, and I think i have them down now. :slight_smile:

now…If only I could figure out what to do about the crazy looks I get while doing them. Everyone seems to think the GHR is some sort of special ab bench.

[quote]buckeye girl wrote:
thanks guys!

I tried them again after doing a little more research on form, and I think i have them down now. :slight_smile:

now…If only I could figure out what to do about the crazy looks I get while doing them. Everyone seems to think the GHR is some sort of special ab bench.[/quote]

A good way to discredit any comments like that is to inform anyone using the GHR as an ab bench that doing so will spread their butt cheeks apart and cause them all sorts of trouble.

[quote]buckeye girl wrote:
thanks guys!

I tried them again after doing a little more research on form, and I think i have them down now. :slight_smile:

now…If only I could figure out what to do about the crazy looks I get while doing them. Everyone seems to think the GHR is some sort of special ab bench.[/quote]

Turn around, bend over, and show 'em what you’re building!

Seriously, just ask the gym management to put a little sign that says the machine’s name with a laminated card of the exercises one can do on it.

Or a laminated copy of the Dave Tate article on the GHR on eliteFTS’s web site (just find any of their GHR machine models and look for the link to the article- I know this because I regularly visit to drool over some of the equipment I’d love to have).

The management should want their members to know how to take advantage of the equipment they offer, and the value they are getting from their membership.

Or, you can just tell them that it is the latest core exercise (call it the inverse hyper reverse medial crunches or something equally silly) to firm up the interior ab muscles without building the bulk in your abs that makes your stomach stick out. They’ll all be doing them within a week.

Or, if you’re really cruel you could say that you learned it in the new edition of the “Buns of Steel” video on toning your tush and slimming your hips. You’ll guarantee that the guys won’t touch it and then you can embarrass them by squating and deadlifting more than them.

One thing to note about the glute-ham bench at your gym: it most likely is designed incorrectly.

Elite FTS has “remedied” this problem by tilting the pad angle. Once it is tilted the glute-ham bench works the way it should and is much more difficult.

Check out the tilt on the picture of this glute-ham bench from Elite FTS: http://www.flexcart.com/members/elitefts/default.asp?m=PD&cid=326&pid=7

If the one you use is straight, you’re not getting the real benefits and probably can crank out more reps than expected.