T Nation

First Fishing Rod

I wanna start fishing this spring/summer. I’ve never really done much fishing before, so I’m not sure where to start.

  1. What would be a quality beginner rod?
  2. What kind of bait would be best?
  3. Should I bother with sinkers and lures?

Thanks in advance.

CS

Dynamite.

That is all.

You gotta say where and what you plan to catch.

[quote]overstand wrote:
You gotta say where and what you plan to catch. [/quote]

Well, we mostly have lakes (not too many rivers) filled with small and large-mouth bass and some blue-gills.

CS

[quote]overstand wrote:
You gotta say where and what you plan to catch. [/quote]

I really, really thought about that, but then I thought, when he wants to fish anything, anywhere, dynamite is the only correct answer.

What kind of fishing do you want to do?

Cane pole?

Live bait or lures?

What kind of lures? Fly-fishing?

What size fish are you go after?

[quote]Tex Ag wrote:
What kind of fishing do you want to do?

Cane pole?

Live bait or lures?

What kind of lures? Fly-fishing?

What size fish are you go after?[/quote]

Like I said, I’ve hardly ever fished before. Cane pole is an option I’ve considered. Live bait most likely. And the fish shouldn’t be more than 8-12".

CS

Get a Zebco 33 combo.

It’s a decent rod (especially for your first) and it’s relatively cheap but quality. It’d be a good enough rod to catch small to medium sized fish with and you’d get an idea if you really wanted to invest in higher quality rods or not.

Red worms are an easy bait. Look under damp leaves , logs, or rocks… there is always some somewhere. Sunfish will hit on them all day long. You can always buy nightcrawlers from your local bait shop too.

You can play with lures if you like but don’t just buy ones that look cool. Pick a fish you know is in wherever you are going to fish and pick a lure that is meant for that fish. Panfish lure kits are pretty cheap usually.

[quote]krazykoukides wrote:
Get a Zebco 33 combo.

It’s a decent rod (especially for your first) and it’s relatively cheap but quality. It’d be a good enough rod to catch small to medium sized fish with and you’d get an idea if you really wanted to invest in higher quality rods or not.

Red worms are an easy bait. Look under damp leaves , logs, or rocks… there is always some somewhere. Sunfish will hit on them all day long. You can always buy nightcrawlers from your local bait shop too.

You can play with lures if you like but don’t just buy ones that look cool. Pick a fish you know is in wherever you are going to fish and pick a lure that is meant for that fish. Panfish lure kits are pretty cheap usually.[/quote]

This is what I was looking for. Thanks!

CS

Oh, and I wouldn’t recommend fly fishing unless you have somebody who likes to fly fish there to teach you. I bought fly fishing gear last year and having nobody to help me learn how to fly fish was a major point of frustration.

I don’t care what seasoned anglers say… fly fishing is way harder to learn than spincast. lol

An easy way to get worms, assuming you have a yard, is set the mower out on (or start to now your lawn). The vibration will bring the worms to the surface. Raking works as well and is probably the better option.

[quote]CSEagles1694 wrote:

[quote]overstand wrote:
You gotta say where and what you plan to catch. [/quote]

Well, we mostly have lakes (not too many rivers) filled with small and large-mouth bass and some blue-gills.

CS[/quote]
Pretty much any rod and reel combo between $50-70 will be fine initially.

You won’t be able to discern much difference between these and more expensive rigs until you’ve picked up some experience and developed a style. Just like a $1k driver is ridiculous for a brand new golfer or a $300 dollar pair of cleats for a kid in his first baseball game…

Generally spinner bait will be good for bass but fill your tackle box with variety; weather, seasons, lighting et cetera can vary bait success rate.

You can catch bluegill with worm on a string tied around a coke can ftr.

[quote]krazykoukides wrote:
Oh, and I wouldn’t recommend fly fishing unless you have somebody who likes to fly fish there to teach you. I bought fly fishing gear last year and having nobody to help me learn how to fly fish was a major point of frustration.

I don’t care what seasoned anglers say… fly fishing is way harder to learn than spincast. lol[/quote]

I learned to flyfish from a book. Yeah, it is harder. Where in NY are you? I am thinking of getting a licence this year and breaking out the fly rod.

I think over all for most fun and ease of learning is a light weight spin fishing. You can practice in the yard by adding a light weight to the end of the line.

[quote]HoustonGuy wrote:

[quote]CSEagles1694 wrote:

[quote]overstand wrote:
You gotta say where and what you plan to catch. [/quote]

Well, we mostly have lakes (not too many rivers) filled with small and large-mouth bass and some blue-gills.

CS[/quote]
Pretty much any rod and reel combo between $50-70 will be fine initially.

You won’t be able to discern much difference between these and more expensive rigs until you’ve picked up some experience and developed a style. Just like a $1k driver is ridiculous for a brand new golfer or a $300 dollar pair of cleats for a kid in his first baseball game…

Generally spinner bait will be good for bass but fill your tackle box with variety; weather, seasons, lighting et cetera can vary bait success rate.

You can catch bluegill with worm on a string tied around a coke can ftr.[/quote]

I remember reading an article about flyfishing for sturgeons in Mongolia. They used a squirrel tail for the fly and q coke can for an indicator.

[quote]Tex Ag wrote:

[quote]krazykoukides wrote:
Oh, and I wouldn’t recommend fly fishing unless you have somebody who likes to fly fish there to teach you. I bought fly fishing gear last year and having nobody to help me learn how to fly fish was a major point of frustration.

I don’t care what seasoned anglers say… fly fishing is way harder to learn than spincast. lol[/quote]

I learned to flyfish from a book. Yeah, it is harder. Where in NY are you? I am thinking of getting a licence this year and breaking out the fly rod.

I think over all for most fun and ease of learning is a light weight spin fishing. You can practice in the yard by adding a light weight to the end of the line.
[/quote]

I learned from the internet.

These guys- http://www.sexyloops.com/ are the shiznet. The directory should be considered the fly casting bible.

something else to keep in mind …habitat , environment ,and available cover . if the lake is loaded with weeds , and your plan is to haul bass out of those weeds , the rod/line you need is heavier than what you need for less weedy environments .

if your lakes are crystal clear , you need equipment that can handle light lines and smaller baits , and probably orient yourself towards fishing deeper…as compared to darker waters where larger baits may work better .

isnt Illinois in cat-country ?

check out Lake-Link

[quote]SkyzykS wrote:

[quote]Tex Ag wrote:

[quote]krazykoukides wrote:
Oh, and I wouldn’t recommend fly fishing unless you have somebody who likes to fly fish there to teach you. I bought fly fishing gear last year and having nobody to help me learn how to fly fish was a major point of frustration.

I don’t care what seasoned anglers say… fly fishing is way harder to learn than spincast. lol[/quote]

I learned to flyfish from a book. Yeah, it is harder. Where in NY are you? I am thinking of getting a licence this year and breaking out the fly rod.

I think over all for most fun and ease of learning is a light weight spin fishing. You can practice in the yard by adding a light weight to the end of the line.
[/quote]

I learned from the internet.

These guys- http://www.sexyloops.com/ are the shiznet. The directory should be considered the fly casting bible.
[/quote]

Bookmarked

You probably could get book on fishing from the library that could help you with much of this.

Time to bump the fishing thread?

http://tnation.T-Nation.com/free_online_forum/music_movies_girls_life/the_fishing_thread?id=2372747&pageNo=18

I’m usually surf casting or heavy fly fishing (10wt) for striped bass. The beauty of heavy flies is that you really don’t have to finesse (which I have none). Just throw it and make it look half-decent on the return.