T Nation

Fireman Hopeful


#1

How's it going T Nation it's my first post here. As you can probably see by my name my goal is to become a fireman. I'm highly motivated the only thing that's lacking is how I workout. So this is what I plan on doing starting next Monday. So let me know what you think and if I should change anything.

I plan on following the juggernat method 2.0

Monday: bench day in the morning / later in the day go find a track or a hill and so some sprints

Tuesday: Off

Wednesday: Deadlift day / Long distance running later in the day

Thursday: Off

Friday: Overhead press

Saturday: Squat day

Sunday: Long distance running or go on a long hike

My goals are to get stronger and bigger and just be overall better conditioned. Also I wana lose a little fat

Height: 6"1
Weight: 210 pounds
Body fat: probably around 17-20

And as far as calories I was thinking like 3400 for Monday and Wednesday. And like 3000 for Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. And 2700 on my off days. So let me know what you guys think and what I should change. Do you think this would work or would I just put on more fat.

Any input from other fireman, military, or any other athletes that train this way would be great


#2

Is your goal to pass the PT test?


#3

No I just wana be all around better conditioned I wana try and get on a hand crew by next summer and there workouts are not easy


#4

QFT.

What is the PT test you have to pass. How close are you to that right now. What are your strengths and weaknesses. And why juggernaut, a powerlifting program? To be honest, I don't think this workout will get you PT/Fireman ready. You have to train for the test.

When I was preparing for OCS, I was running 4x a week. Everything from sprints, to intervals, to 5 milers for time. Twice a week I did bodyweight circuits, and twice a week I lifted full body (Squat, Row, Press, and Deadlift, Bench, W Pull Ups) to maintain my strength. One day a week was devoted to a long distance weighted hike. These were all things I knew that I needed to be good at, so I focused on them.

I would imagine you should include stair running in your program, as well as many variations of weighted carries, buddy carries, buddy drags, all in boots.

And from a programming standpoint, your training Friday-Monday straight through, and then alternating days on and off. Long distance running after deadlifting may cause problems with your lower back. If you really want to stick with lifting 4x a week, I would recommend something like

Monday- Deadlift, PT conditioning
Tuesday- Bench, stairs
Wednesday-Off
Thursday- Squat, PT conditioning
Friday- Press, stairs
Saturday-Long Run or Hike
Sunday-Off


#5

Ok I see what you mean with the deadlifting and long distance running on the same day won't be a good idea. And if you where to set up a strength program for what your doing in the military because that level of fitness is similar to the fire department how would you set it up. What excirses and reps and sets would you choose. And my weakness is long distance running. And also I have to work out Wednesdays because I'm taking wieght training this semester of college and it's Monday and Wednesdays


#6

OP- if you haven't already, you may want to check out a pre-fire academy orientation or test prep program offered at a local community college. These programs will give you a good idea on the PT expectations and standards for the career. It would help you tailor your workout for your goals. I believe Rio Hondo, Santa Ana College and Mt SAC all have programs. You may also want to reference Stewart Smith's workout programs (pretty sure he has a FF one) and check out hotshotfitness.com for workout suggestions.


#7

[quote]LAFDWANABE wrote:
Ok I see what you mean with the deadlifting and long distance running on the same day won’t be a good idea. And if you where to set up a strength program for what your doing in the military because that level of fitness is similar to the fire department how would you set it up. What excirses and reps and sets would you choose. And my weakness is long distance running. And also I have to work out Wednesdays because I’m taking wieght training this semester of college and it’s Monday and Wednesdays [/quote]

Okay so shift the schedule up a day?

Sunday-Deadlift
Monday-Bench
Tuesday-Off
Wed- Squat
Thurs- OHP
Fri- Long run ect.
Sat- Off

I honestly believe one long run a week is sufficient to improve distance running, as long as you do enough cardiovascular conditioning throughout the week. 3-4 10-20 minute sessions should be enough to keep you stimulated. A great program to build up long distance running involves alternating walking and running for 60 minutes. So you would do

Week 1- 1 min run, 4 minute walk (12 minutes total running)
Week 2- 2 minute run, 3 minute walk ect

Every week you increase your run length by 1 minute, and drop the walk by 1 minute. Because you’re always moving, you still keep your heart rate up high on the walk sessions. Because long distance running is your weakness, it may be better to increase in 30 second intervals, or progress slower in some way.

And while bodyweight strength is highly prized in the military, being functionally strong is more important to success. To that end, a solid way to start may be something along the lines of 5/3/1 with bodyweight assistance exercises. Basically, do your deads, squats, benches, and presses with heavy ass weight (for you) and low reps, and the do push ups, pull ups variations, dips, bodyweight rows, walking lunges, and plyometric jumps for your assistance exercises. Something like

Deadlift 5/3/1, Box Jumps 3x5, BW/Goblet squat 3x40
Bench 5/3/1, Pull Ups 5x12, Dips 3x (1 rep under failure)
Squat 5/3/1, Long Jumps 3x5, Walking Lunge 3x100 m
Press 5/3/1, Bodyweight Rows, Push Ups 3x50

(The reps are approximations, just to give you an idea). Basically go heavy on the main lift, and then go high rep on the assiatance.

And I may get flamed for this, but I feel that properly designed and scaled Crossfit style WOD’s done for 10-15 minutes at the end of a workout as cardio/finishers are a great way to build work capacity. Only do them maybe 1-2 times a week. Your cardio after the other days should be stair running, sprints, or Prowler pushes.