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Fire Fighting Academy Bulking Help

Alright guys,obviously i am asking for some help with a workout routine.
I have about 5 months until i go to my community colleges fire fighting academy, and im trying to add as much strength and mass as i can.
Any help would be great.
I weight around 145lbs and im 5’10.
I just take Dymatize whey pre and post workout with pb, milk, oats, and a banana.
Dymatize Gourmet protein bed time (blend)
And just the cheapest creatine i can find.

Also, i need to know how to eat to gain weight.
I have a very fast metabolism, and i work at a restaurant so i run around all day so it doesnt help.
I try to eat a big ass costco chicken and brown rice for lunch, but its hard since we have no microwave at my work.

Thanks guys,
Good luck on your transformations!!!

This should probably be in beginners, not bodybuilding.

I’m assuming you’re lifting right now; otherwise you probably wouldn’t be using protein powder.

Eating guidelines are essentially: get a minimum of 1g of protein per lb of bodyweight; most people have seen better results with 1.5-2g per lb. Then, make sure you get enough fats and carbs. You do NOT want to be burning that protein for energy.

Take in enough calories to grow. If you’re not growing, take in more calories. Based on your metabolism, you may need to be taking in a lot more calories than you currently are.

As far as a workout routine, the staples around here are usually some form of a 3x5 or 5x5 routine for a beginner. Starting Strength is one option. StrongLifts 5x5 is another. 5/3/1 is also an option.

P.S., thank you for actually being very specific about your stats and your goals.

you need to eat “chicken and brown rice” like 6 times more per day

Sorry, i just made my account.
Didnt even know there was a beginner forum lol
So people say calculate how much cals u need, n others just say hit ur protein and carbs and dont worry about cals.

[quote]chadtheman wrote:
Sorry, i just made my account.
Didnt even know there was a beginner forum lol
So people say calculate how much cals u need, n others just say hit ur protein and carbs and dont worry about cals.[/quote]

And the people who say the latter probably are not growing. That mentality is not conducive to bulking, unless you want a fat bulk and you eat anything and everything in site. You need to know your calories. WHy? Because most people underestimate their calorie consumption. Big time.

I had a prediciment recently where I started taking new meds for adhd and started losing weight. BUt I count my calories and over a 3 week period I found out I need an extra 700 calories to mainain weight and will need more to gain again. I only know that because I actually counted them. If not it might have taken me 3 months to guestimate and work through it.

[quote]chadtheman wrote:
Sorry, i just made my account.
Didnt even know there was a beginner forum lol
So people say calculate how much cals u need, n others just say hit ur protein and carbs and dont worry about cals.[/quote]

Well, as you learn more about nutrition, and the more you want to fine-tune the nutrition that works FOR YOU, it makes sense to be more precise about your intake… i.e., calculating exactly what you need.

Generally, the only people that need to be that specific about their exact intake, getting down to everything including meal timing, are those dieting down for competition or whatever.

However, when you’re putting on weight, it’s best to focus on increasing the calories so you’re putting on weight. Hitting a minimum protein level is about the only thing set in stone.

Once you’re eating enough to put on weight, then you can adjust your total calories up and down, as well as your carbs vs fats, in order to control how much muscle vs fat you put on.

So, at this point, about all you need to focus on is “eat more and train hard”. Later, when you get a better idea how your body responds, you can start changing things based on how they work for you.

Most skinny guys will think they’re eating alot but it ends up not being enough. All of my friends who tried to gain muscle had to learn to eat past their comfort level. Just something I’ve noticed.

I realize you asked about mass and bulking but…

If you can, sign up for a pre-academy PT or prep class at the community college. It will give you an excellent idea of the physical requirements/expectations of that academy and how to better prep for it. You’ll find though there is a strength component to the training, it is more about muscular endurance than pure size and strength. Running the tower with gear, moving hoses and gear around, swing an 8lb sledge hammer (25+ times),…etc.

Orange County Fire Authority (CA) took a look at their academy’s PT program and modified it around 2006-07. the report should be on-line with descriptions of the exercises. I recall seeing them bang out a lot of burpees and dumb bell thrusters. Of course, if your academy still runs the Cooper type standards, you’re better off prepping for that.

  1. Go to a local firehouse, introduce yourself, explain your goal, get to know some of the firefighters.
  2. Find the ones that workout regularly and ask their advice and how they train.
  3. Succeed.

Good luck.

[quote]mixicus wrote:
I realize you asked about mass and bulking but…

If you can, sign up for a pre-academy PT or prep class at the community college. It will give you an excellent idea of the physical requirements/expectations of that academy and how to better prep for it. You’ll find though there is a strength component to the training, it is more about muscular endurance than pure size and strength. Running the tower with gear, moving hoses and gear around, swing an 8lb sledge hammer (25+ times),…etc.

Orange County Fire Authority (CA) took a look at their academy’s PT program and modified it around 2006-07. the report should be on-line with descriptions of the exercises. I recall seeing them bang out a lot of burpees and dumb bell thrusters. Of course, if your academy still runs the Cooper type standards, you’re better off prepping for that.[/quote]
^Good Post^

I would figure out how many calories you need and monitor them daily to maximize your gains in the next 5 months. Concentrating on what “exactly” goes into your mouth for 5 months won’t kill you.

As for the workout portion of your training I like this post. You become better at a certain movement pattern by repeatedly practicing that movement. With this in mind figure out exactly what the tests will be and incorporate those exercises into a program. If you run up a flight of stairs with 85 pounds of gear on then put 85 pounds of sand in a canvas bag and get your a** up some stairs a few times a week, etc.

Eat:
http://tnation.T-Nation.com/free_online_forum/diet_performance_nutrition_supplements/dave_tate_westside_bulking_diet?id=5309752&pageNo=0

I have ONE piece of advice for you: Buy Dan John’s “mass made simple”. It’s a six week bulking program. Follow it to the letter - oh, and don’t make any major plans for those six weeks. Try to put on some size fast to get up to 160-170 - which isn’t very much - then maintain it and work on your endurance.