T Nation

Finally, 10 Diet Myths 'Busted'


#1

http://www.webmd.com/diet/news/20081028/the-truth-behind-ten-diet-myths

Some real gems here....

Myth: Protein is the most important nutrient for athletes.
Reality: "It is true that athletes need more protein than sedentary people. They just don't need as much as they think. And they probably don't need it from supplements; they're probably getting plenty in their food," Rosenbloom says.

But timing matters. Rosenbloom recommends that after weight training, athletes consume a little bit of protein -- about 8 grams, the amount in a small carton of low-fat chocolate milk -- to help their muscles rebuild.

"That's probably all you need," she says. "You don't need four scoops of whey powder to get that amount of protein."

You mean I have been wasting my money on Surge all of these years when I could've just went to school with my little brother and bullied him and his friends for a small carton of chocolate milk from the school cafeteria?!?!?!


#2

Next time I see one of those commercials about how great wedMD is, I’m going to throw something at my TV.


#3

…And the general population continues to make little-to-no progress.


#4

My favorite part is when she says, “That’s probably all you need.”

I love making arbitrary decisions after 12312839 years of schooling!


#5

[quote]RSGZ wrote:
…And the general population continues to make little-to-no progress.[/quote]

you are being too kind…with the developing obesity and diabetes epidemics upon us, making little-to-no progress would indeed still be progress compared to the current state of affairs.


#6

Some of that just doesn’t make sense.

Like the one where the myth is that whole grains are healthier than refined ones. Then he goes on to explain that you don’t have to completely give up refined ones.

He didn’t actually address the “myth” which is really more or less true according to the first statement he makes in rebuttal to the myth, “Whole grains are a healthy choice”. pretty much says this is a myth, but it’s true.

Also, to my knowledge, dextrose, fructose, glucose, est. do process differently.


#7

Shakes head…opens mouth to speak…stops…shakes head again…walks away


#8

And the worse part is that the uneducated public will treat this as a holy grail of nutritional knowledge, and throw it in our faces like we’re wrong. Unbelieveable.


#9

Sugar doesn’t cause behavior problems for kids…


#10

My wife just flipped about the sugar and kids one too…

Wow, Webmd huh?


#11

Every time this article mentioned sugar, I cringed.


#12

[quote]DoubleDuce wrote:
Some of that just doesn’t make sense.

Like the one where the myth is that whole grains are healthier than refined ones. Then he goes on to explain that you don’t have to completely give up refined ones.

He didn’t actually address the “myth” which is really more or less true according to the first statement he makes in rebuttal to the myth, “Whole grains are a healthy choice”. pretty much says this is a myth, but it’s true.

Also, to my knowledge, dextrose, fructose, glucose, est. do process differently.[/quote]

I’m not so sure I see how the whole grain/refined grain myth doesn’t make sense.

Whole grains are good for you, but, due to the enrichment process performed on refined grains, whether or not they are always a more healthful selection really depends on what you are looking for in your grain-based product.

And there is a difference between how we “process” certain sugars (yes, glucose and fructose are processed differently) and how we “handle” them (more specifically, whether or not one has a more destructive impact on our physique goals to the extent that we should be demonizing it).

As for her post-workout protein recommendation… not too far off of what the NTS system recommends in their post-workout “Anabolic Phase”.

This article is actually fairly reasonable for the Average Joe. There are some things I would tweak here and there, but just because it’s not T-Nation doesn’t mean it’s absolute shit.


#13

hey 30+ years of bad dietary/nutritional advice have resulted in disastrous rates of obesity, cancer, heart disease and diabetes

so clearly we should keep preaching the same stupid dogma right ?

these particular statements need to disappear from the minds of medical professionals

  • don’t eat meat
  • eat soy instead of meat
  • whole grains are better than animal proteins/fats
  • you can’t have high fiber without high carbs
  • fat is bad for you
  • saturated fat is bad for you
  • “natural” sugar is healthy, no it isn’t…IT’S STILL SUGAR !
  • cholesterol is bad for you
  • sodium is bad for you (the potassium:sodium balance is more important)
  • resistance training is detrimental to growth, development and overall health

and the worst offender of all…skinny fat = healthy

8 grams of protein PWO ? i think that was a typo and there should be a 5 in front of the 8 (ie. 58 grams)

but i could be mistaken, maybe the researchers in question are 110 lb abercrombie wearing douchebag bitches who can bench 500, squat 800 and deadlift 1k


#14

[quote]Jrocco wrote:
Sugar doesn’t cause behavior problems for kids…
[/quote]

here’s an earth-shattering revelation to medical professionals and the public in general

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT

this advice isn’t exactly recent either


#15

[quote]Burst wrote:
And the worse part is that the uneducated public will treat this as a holy grail of nutritional knowledge, and throw it in our faces like we’re wrong. Unbelieveable.[/quote]

the blind devotion of the public to “experts” regardless of what field they are in (scientific or otherwise) is quite astounding in north america

people should trust their own experience a bit more and the “experts” a bit less


#16

[quote]cyph31 wrote:
hey 30+ years of bad dietary/nutritional advice have resulted in disastrous rates of obesity, cancer, heart disease and diabetes
[/quote]

Just to play devil’s advocate… you really think all those fat/cancerous/heart disease/diabetes people in America have followed all the government’s recommendations on eating (low fat food pyramid nonsense?) I bet they haven’t…


#17

when i see people buying non-fat (ie. 0%) flavored yogurt oblivious to the fact it will spike their insulin through the roof (with all the sugar and other garbage) and then they are PROUD of their purchase

yes i really do believe there are many chowing down tons of carbs and sugars in a low-fat diet and wondering why the fuck their BF% is so high

just change all the stupid low-fat dogma to low-carb and my complaints will stop


#18

[quote]cyph31 wrote:
when i see people buying non-fat (ie. 0%) flavored yogurt oblivious to the fact it will spike their insulin through the roof (with all the sugar and other garbage) and then they are PROUD of their purchase

yes i really do believe there are many chowing down tons of carbs and sugars in a low-fat diet and wondering why the fuck their BF% is so high

just change all the stupid low-fat dogma to low-carb and my complaints will stop [/quote]

and what makes low carb dogma any better?

for every fat-ass who’s eating low fat wondering why he’s still overweight, there’s a fat-ass who’s eating low carb and wondering the same exact thing.

don’t believe me? go visit the hundreds of low-carb support forums out there and read the thousands of threads about why they can’t lose weight despite eating less than 50g of carbs per day.

and despite what many of you are saying, that is actually a pretty good article. the only thing i disagree with is the paltry amount of protein they suggest for after exercise. although it is probably good enough for the articles target audience of moderate/low-intensity exercisers.


#19

not surprisingly, that article was absolute TRASH.


#20

"Rosenbloom recommends that after weight training, athletes consume a little bit of protein – about 8 grams, the amount in a small carton of low-fat chocolate milk – to help their muscles rebuild.

‘That’s probably all you need,’ she says. ‘you don’t need four scoops of whey powder to get that amount of protein.’"

This comment of hers made me almost burst out laughing. 8g of protein for a strength athlete post-workout? WTF is her problem.