Fighting MMA with 2 Torn Labrum

Hello.

I’m still fighting on february 15th.

My MRI from both shoulders came back and i’ve got some small tears but nothing big that would justify a surgery.

It was due to excessive volume from lifting and wear and tear from kickboxing training on a tight schedule.

My right shoulder popped on my last fight, on december 15, i’ve been doing some physiotherapy with band work, RICE and training almost everything besides hooks and ground work, i was training wrestling freestyle but since it was dangerous getting sprawled and the shoulder popping again i switched back to greco-roman.

After the fight, according to my orthopedist i will take 3 months off to focus solely on getting it 100%, it doesn’t mean i will stop training, just that i will lift more focusing on legs, abs and shoulders.

My shoulder and pec work is pretty much restricted to pushups and some variations.

Looking for some input and suggestions if someone ever fought with a shoulder in that condition.

[quote]kaisermetal wrote:
Hello.

I’m still fighting on february 15th.

My MRI from both shoulders came back and i’ve got some small tears but nothing big that would justify a surgery.

It was due to excessive volume from lifting and wear and tear from kickboxing training on a tight schedule.

My right shoulder popped on my last fight, on december 15, i’ve been doing some physiotherapy with band work, RICE and training almost everything besides hooks and ground work, i was training wrestling freestyle but since it was dangerous getting sprawled and the shoulder popping again i switched back to greco-roman.

After the fight, according to my orthopedist i will take 3 months off to focus solely on getting it 100%, it doesn’t mean i will stop training, just that i will lift more focusing on legs, abs and shoulders.

My shoulder and pec work is pretty much restricted to pushups and some variations.

Looking for some input and suggestions if someone ever fought with a shoulder in that condition.[/quote]

Ok, first (and mostly to tweak FighingIrish) thank you for going to a doctor and being evaluated. I cannot offer any experiential advice on competing with bad shoulders, but I can way in a bit about general clinical aspects of this and maybe a bit of opinion.

First, standard disclaimer:

I am not YOUR doctor. Nothing a type should or could take the place of actual, specific medical advice given with the benefit of exam and diagnostic studies.

As a general rule I am not a huge fan of fighting, or any competition, with severe orthopaedic injuries unless you are damn sure the potential benefits are worth the risk. Existing “minor” injuries can turn into career enders if things go wrong. Additionally, the impact doesn’t necessarily end with competition. I would refference kmcnyc’s posts for how injuries accumulated during high level competition don’t go away.

I am hoping that you and your doc went over the nature of the problems and possible complications. I generally consider an injury that prevents training/practicing something likely to be done in competition(freestyle wrestling, hooks) to be a strong yellow flag(possible contraindication) if not an outright red flag(contraindication). Still, I don’t know your exact condition.

As for managing shoulder issues. A lot of the how to get through it stuff is condition specific. I can go into this more, later. I just got a phone call and need to litterally run out the door.

Regards,

Robert A

Kaiser,

Sorry, I have been busy. I am also typing with a bad hand and just lost a longer post.

None of the below constitutes medical advice.

1.) Face Pulls and/or band pull aparts- Many, many people benefit from these. Performing these can both build up muscle, and sort of “balance” all the other pressing, and punching, and floor work associated with training.

2.) Internal Shoulder Rotation/Posterior Shoulder Capsule mobilization- There is a known association with anterior capsular instability and posterior GH capsule restriction as well as significant correlation between decreased internal rotation(and especially decreased combined internal and external rotation/ rotational ROM) and an increase risk of labral injury. Typically the long head of the biceps is involved as well.

The correlation has caused some to explore increasing shoulder internal rotation/mobilizing the posterior aspect of the joint capsule as a means of effective treatment of non-surgical, but symptomatic, shoulders. I have seen success here. I would check into this, but clear it with your doc/PT.

3.) Stability Exercises- Switching to push up or handstand push up variations for pressing work is sworn by in some circles. Turkish get ups are also held in high regard by a bunch of folks, but the technique issue is more significant.

4.) General Stretching of Shortened Muscles- Dan John has written several pieces going into muscles that tend towards shortened/over activity and lengthened/under activity. That can be a good intro, but my strong clinical preference is to specifically evaluate for key links/dysfunction.

I hope the above is somewhat clear.

How is training?

Regards,

Robert A