T Nation

Fight Basics 101

You have to train a ‘fight virgin’ to wage war in a sanctioned MMA fight. Although the guy you’re training is in good shape, he’s never so much as through a punch.

You have six weeks…GO

Basically, what this boils down to is what do you think are the basic fundamentals, and in what order to you place their importance. For instance, he’s not going to become a Jiu-Jitsu champion in six weeks, so which parts should he learn; the same thing is applied to boxing/wrestling/muay thai, etc.

So I’m guessing you’re the “fight virgin”. Well, good luck.

Go pick some random fights with 6’6" 300 pound bouncers at the craziest club/bar you can find. You’ll learn the basics of fighting real quick.

Are you serious? Where did you dream this up?

The first thing I’d teach him is not to show up for the fight. If he was going to be dragged there kicking and screaming, I’d concentrate on teaching him to throw proper punches, knees and elbows and low kicks and some basic slips. The rest would be concentrated on the sprawl and avoiding takedowns and basic guard if he did get taken down (at which point, it would be a wrap).

You do of course realize you couldn’t teach anymore to properly defend themselves in 6 weeks against someone that has trained to fight. Right?

I take his opponent would be on his niveau?

I’ll teach him to a) shoot (double and single leg) and apply b) about three basic submissions along with c) ground and pound.

A bit of stand up fighting would be only to tough him up and make him calmer when standing. That way he won’t telegraph like crazy and/or panic. He’d learn two punches: the jab, the cross and perhaps two variations.

If he showed great boxing talent, I’d teach him to close the distance with an overhand right counter.

I really hope this is hypothetical.

You can’t submit someone with 6 weeks training except by brute force choke. C’mon.

And now that I’m thinking of it, why are we even answering this thread. It’s stupid.

So… what is going to happen to you in six weeks?

I agree, stupid question. Unless the person is ungodly athletic, or has some solid background in a different combat art/sport, they’re dead meat.

As far as what I’d consider to be the most “bang for your buck” things to teach someone:

I’d focus on

  1. Conditioning- I don’t care how “in shape” someone is, if they aren’t used to grappling/striking all out for extended periods of time, then they’re gonna burn out fast and be easy prey

  2. Positioning (both striking and grappling)- if you can consistently get a good position on someone, then your chances of successfully scoring with your techniques is greatly enhanced, and their success will be greatly decreased

  3. Set Point control- not something that I see a lot of people talking about, but a very effective and beneficial concept to understand. In a nutshell, before someone can attack you (whether it be striking or grappling), they must get “set”. Learning how to prevent this and get off first (since the one attacking always has the timing advantage) will go a long way towards making you a much more effective fighter.

  4. Controlling distance (striking)- another very important and effective strategy. If you can consistently control the distance, you will find that you become much harder to hit, and much more effective at hitting your target.

I think technique training is important as well, especially if you want to reach your potential and I’m not saying that I wouldn’t teach them technique. But, techniques aren’t nearly as effective without the strategy and the endurance to use them. That’s why I would focus on the above areas.

[quote]TheBodyGuard wrote:
Are you serious? Where did you dream this up?

The first thing I’d teach him is not to show up for the fight. If he was going to be dragged there kicking and screaming, I’d concentrate on teaching him to throw proper punches, knees and elbows and low kicks and some basic slips. The rest would be concentrated on the sprawl and avoiding takedowns and basic guard if he did get taken down (at which point, it would be a wrap).

You do of course realize you couldn’t teach anymore to properly defend themselves in 6 weeks against someone that has trained to fight. Right?[/quote]

This is about the most correct statement here.

It is next to impossible to teach anyone shit about BJJ in 6 weeks. submissions are out of the question. Take downs are even harder to learn on any decent level.

Using more “natural” tools such as punches and kicks are a more likely method. So spend your time on take down defense/conditioning and hope to hell you can catch the guy with a punch.

-chris

!
This is something I’m aware of for some time now, though I never found anything about it in literature.
Do you know some sources you could share?

Lyoto Machida is a master in exploiting that, while the Klitschkos had such a long “set phase” for the most time of their career, that I considered it Vlad’s greatest weakness.

I must add, however, that this is a very advanced technique. I’m not sure if a beginner could make good use of it.

Two guys of similar weight and 6 week experience can’t take themselves down and force a tapout?

I believe, if the other 6-weeker focused primarily on strikes “my” groundfighter would probably win.

[quote]Schwarzfahrer wrote:

  1. Set Point control- not something that I see a lot of people talking about, but a very effective and beneficial concept to understand. In a nutshell, before someone can attack you (whether it be striking or grappling), they must get “set”. Learning how to prevent this and get off first (since the one attacking always has the timing advantage) will go a long way towards making you a much more effective fighter.

!
This is something I’m aware of for some time now, though I never found anything about it in literature.
Do you know some sources you could share?

Lyoto Machida is a master in exploiting that, while the Klitschkos had such a long “set phase” for the most time of their career, that I considered it Vlad’s greatest weakness.

I must add, however, that this is a very advanced technique. I’m not sure if a beginner could make good use of it.[/quote]

I can’t offer any written sources unfortunately. But Joe Lewis has a whole DVD on it. It’s not an exhaustive resource by any means, but he does explain the strategy fairly well and gives some decent drills to help develop it.

Honestly I agree though, it’s gonna take a while before you are proficient enough at it to make it work against a trained opponent (and even then, no strategy works 100% of the time).

Like I said earlier, unless you were ungodly athletic (unbelievable reflexes, speed, power, timing, etc…) or under the watchful eye of a master instructor and trained 24/7, you’re probably gonna get your ass handed to you (and even then it’s likely).

Really I think the most you could hope to get from this experience is just that, experience. You’ll know what it’s like to get beat (hopefully the guy you’re fighting is nice enough to end it quickly), what it’s like to actually get in the ring and fight, and hopefully you’ll have started on your way to learning how to actually fight.

Your only hope is the ancient art of Fetal Fighting, now ruled by Grand Master Fred Ettish.

This is a subtle and mysterious art, but the basics are as follows:

  1. Cover your head, especially the face area. This is where you are most vulnerable.

  2. Go quickly to the ground. If you can get there before your opponent gets to you, so much the better.

  3. Assume the fetal position. This pose is the essence of life, and from it flows guaranteed victory.

  4. Allow your opponent to tire himself by repeatedly throwing useless kicks and punches at your well-protected form. If all goes well, he will over-tax himself, resulting in a unconsciousness, or even a heart attack.

  5. Await the referee’s whistle. That sound, my friend, is the sound of a champion being crowned.

[quote]Sentoguy wrote:
I agree, stupid question. Unless the person is ungodly athletic, or has some solid background in a different combat art/sport, they’re dead meat.

As far as what I’d consider to be the most “bang for your buck” things to teach someone:

I’d focus on

  1. Conditioning- I don’t care how “in shape” someone is, if they aren’t used to grappling/striking all out for extended periods of time, then they’re gonna burn out fast and be easy prey

  2. Positioning (both striking and grappling)- if you can consistently get a good position on someone, then your chances of successfully scoring with your techniques is greatly enhanced, and their success will be greatly decreased

  3. Set Point control- not something that I see a lot of people talking about, but a very effective and beneficial concept to understand. In a nutshell, before someone can attack you (whether it be striking or grappling), they must get “set”. Learning how to prevent this and get off first (since the one attacking always has the timing advantage) will go a long way towards making you a much more effective fighter.

  4. Controlling distance (striking)- another very important and effective strategy. If you can consistently control the distance, you will find that you become much harder to hit, and much more effective at hitting your target.

I think technique training is important as well, especially if you want to reach your potential and I’m not saying that I wouldn’t teach them technique. But, techniques aren’t nearly as effective without the strategy and the endurance to use them. That’s why I would focus on the above areas.[/quote]

I agree. Conditioning!Conditioning!Conditioning! Is KEY. When I had my first wrestling match I thought I was in great shape and I was. But practice and the real thing are 2 different beast. It was the longest 6 min of my life. I though I was going to passout when it was over. I have also done a lot of ju-jitsu.

Work on the basics, get them down cold to where you do them befor you think about doing them. Drill them over and over and over. Get them down cold

I would teach him to pants his opponent within seconds. He (she?) must be nimble, quick, and dexterous. I would teach him the ‘chestnuts-roasting-on-an-open-fire’ technique shamelessly stolen from the Ranma School of ass-kicking as well as actual focus on his pantsing technique and general conditioning for his dexterity.

Oh, I’d also have him run 6 miles every morning after eating a shake blended from a dozen raw eggs. In Philadelphia.