T Nation

Feet Turned Out While Walking

As I strengthen my legs, my feet are more comfortable with the toes turned out when I walk. I feel like a duck.

Am I missing a form?

[quote]TDetroit wrote:
As I strengthen my legs, my feet are more comfortable with the toes turned out when I walk. I feel like a duck.

Am I missing a form?

[/quote]

Get a band and do some hip adductions throughout the day.

I’m not sure if you’re missing a form or not, but I’d make a conscious effort to walk with your feet pointed straight ahead.

[quote]TDetroit wrote:
As I strengthen my legs, my feet are more comfortable with the toes turned out when I walk. I feel like a duck.

Am I missing a form?

[/quote]

My feet have always pointed out as I walk. I have found that as I have lost fat weight and gained muscle and flexibility it isn’t as bad anymore. I try to make a conscious effort to keep my toes pointed forward, but have to watch, as if I do it to much, it makes my knees hurt.

One of my old friends had a problem with this when he was young. He went to the doctor and the doctor told him to stand for one hour with his feet pointed in to a comfortable position with a couple of books on his head. Fixed him right up. Not sure if this would work for somebody who is developed.

If it is truly an adaptation to training, you are very likely developing increased stiffness in your glutes and the lateral rotators of your hips. Some flexibility drills for these muscle groups coupled with a concious effort to keep your toes pointed more forward while you walk or stand should loosen you up.

However, as one post above mentioned, you have to be careful not to actually cause joint problems when trying to correct something that may or may not really be a true problem. For instance, the femur (thigh bone) typically has a slight inward twist from top to bottom called antetorsion. But, it is very common for individuals to have what is referred to as retrotorsion, which is an outward twisting of the femur from top to bottom. This makes an individual appear to stand and walk with their toes turned out. I’ve seen people try to correct this toed-out position in instances where they have significant femoral retrotorsion with very bad results - knee pain, hip pain, and/or low back pain.

Since you probably don’t know what direction or degree of femoral torsion you actually have, just be careful not to force the issue if you try to correct for your toed-out position.

All the best.

[quote]Charles Staley wrote:
I’m not sure if you’re missing a form or not, but I’d make a conscious effort to walk with your feet pointed straight ahead.
[/quote]

Everyone comes out with high and mighty explanations of what exact muscle is deficient (Imo it’s your tibialis anterior, totally screwing you over dude) and the most experienced guy here states the only useful info you need. Stop walking like that.

It’s really that easy. It will take months at least, but with concentrated effort you can get to something better.

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[quote]Sxio wrote:
Charles Staley wrote:
I’m not sure if you’re missing a form or not, but I’d make a conscious effort to walk with your feet pointed straight ahead.

Everyone comes out with high and mighty explanations of what exact muscle is deficient (Imo it’s your tibialis anterior, totally screwing you over dude) and the most experienced guy here states the only useful info you need. Stop walking like that.

It’s really that easy. It will take months at least, but with concentrated effort you can get to something better.
[/quote]

Agreed.

That’s why CS, DJ and PT are growing on me.

To me, they are at a point where training knowledge and experience has translated into training wisdom.

same problem. i then actively tried to walk ‘normal’ and it lead to more problems