T Nation

FarmerBrett is About to Include Skiing in His Workout

It seems that the Brecons area of Wales is about to be covered in surprisingly large amounts of snow (according to the Met Office and the BBC).

As such, its reasonable to expect our resident farmer to include skiing into his workouts for a while.

Well, actually, he’s not going have a lot of choice in the matter. And if he gets snowed in for a long time, at least he has some animals to eat in his farm (and probably horseburgers in his freezer)

Good luck FarmerBrett, hope the thaw comes soon

Hey blubrasil, how’s it going? Where have you been?

I think we’re well prepared here. We’ve got plenty of heating oil and extra food in and we left our car down the road in the village in case we have to get anywhere.

Our old house had a gas cooker and open fires which was great. This place is all electric. If there’s powercuts we’re totally screwed. No heating, no cooking, nothing. I’m pretty sure it won’t be as bad as they say, they always exaggerate. ‘Snowmaggedon’ they’re calling it. Ridiculous!

LOL at the horseburgers. I don’t get it, all these people up in arms about a little bit of horsemeat in their burgers. I’ll eat a dead cow and I’ll eat a dead pig, but there’s NO WAY I’m putting dead horse in my mouth, that’s disgusting.

Most importantly, I’ll still be able to lift, but I don’t think I’ll be doing any running tonight.

[quote]FarmerBrett wrote:
Hey blubrasil, how’s it going? Where have you been?

I think we’re well prepared here. We’ve got plenty of heating oil and extra food in and we left our car down the road in the village in case we have to get anywhere.

Our old house had a gas cooker and open fires which was great. This place is all electric. If there’s powercuts we’re totally screwed. No heating, no cooking, nothing. I’m pretty sure it won’t be as bad as they say, they always exaggerate. ‘Snowmaggedon’ they’re calling it. Ridiculous!

LOL at the horseburgers. I don’t get it, all these people up in arms about a little bit of horsemeat in their burgers. I’ll eat a dead cow and I’ll eat a dead pig, but there’s NO WAY I’m putting dead horse in my mouth, that’s disgusting.

Most importantly, I’ll still be able to lift, but I don’t think I’ll be doing any running tonight.
[/quote]

Doing fine thanks. I took the huff after being censored in another thread, but I got over it and now limit my comments to things like the weather!

I dont know about the exaggeration though, 2 years ago we had 18 inches of snow here, it was hellish, hopefully yours isnt as bad

totally agree, I dont see whats so bad about horsemeat, its got to be better than what goes into normal sausages/pies/bridies etc (or haggis)

good luck, enjoy the whiteout

What about a generator or two for your electricity issues?

[quote]FISCHER613 wrote:
What about a generator or two for your electricity issues?

[/quote]

its too late for that I guess. FarmerBrett will be snowed in for a week now, no way to go to town to buy a generator. He’ll be an emaciated shadow of his former self when he finally digs his way out of the house and then crawls 20 miles to the local Spar for some lavabread. It’ll be like “Touching the Void” all over again.

[quote]bluebrasil wrote:
2 years ago we had 18 inches of snow here, it was hellish [/quote]
Since I live in the Colorado mountains, this cracked me up. 18 inches would be nothing here. But I understand that in some areas, it’s crippling. My brother lives in South Carolina. If there are flurries (even if no accumulation or planned accumulation), EVERYTHING shuts down.

[quote]kpsnap wrote:

[quote]bluebrasil wrote:
2 years ago we had 18 inches of snow here, it was hellish [/quote]
Since I live in the Colorado mountains, this cracked me up. 18 inches would be nothing here. But I understand that in some areas, it’s crippling. My brother lives in South Carolina. If there are flurries (even if no accumulation or planned accumulation), EVERYTHING shuts down.[/quote]

ha ha, yes I see your point. I live at 300 feet above sea level (or so my car sat nav tells me)and that is by far the most snow ive ever seen. mind you, we dont use 4x4’s or winter tyres, or know how to drive in the snow, or have well insulated houses or anything else.

in South England its worse. They get almost no snow, so when they do get an inch or so, its carmageddon

Brett, however lives in Wales, where they are a bit hardier (theyre not all as tough as Brett, but more tough than in South England

…and still no word from the Farmer…he’s cut off from the world I tell you, and considering eating his own shoe leather as we speak.

I have a great picture somewhere where I’m trying to shovel out a car after 60-or-so inches of snow. We had no electricity for six days during that storm. I’m going to look for it tonight.

Stay warm!

[quote]kpsnap wrote:
I have a great picture somewhere where I’m trying to shovel out a car after 60-or-so inches of snow. We had no electricity for six days during that storm. I’m going to look for it tonight.

Stay warm![/quote]

60 inches!!! 5 feet!!! thats not snow, thats a very large collection of snowmen all standing really close to each other.

like the Chinese terra cotta army, but in snow. (with all the gaps between the snow soldiers filled in with more snow)

i know what i mean, even if it makes no sense

[quote]bluebrasil wrote:

[quote]kpsnap wrote:

[quote]bluebrasil wrote:
2 years ago we had 18 inches of snow here, it was hellish [/quote]
Since I live in the Colorado mountains, this cracked me up. 18 inches would be nothing here. But I understand that in some areas, it’s crippling. My brother lives in South Carolina. If there are flurries (even if no accumulation or planned accumulation), EVERYTHING shuts down.[/quote]

ha ha, yes I see your point. I live at 300 feet above sea level (or so my car sat nav tells me)and that is by far the most snow ive ever seen. mind you, we dont use 4x4’s or winter tyres, or know how to drive in the snow, or have well insulated houses or anything else.

in South England its worse. They get almost no snow, so when they do get an inch or so, its carmageddon

Brett, however lives in Wales, where they are a bit hardier (theyre not all as tough as Brett, but more tough than in South England [/quote]

Easy on fella! We had to deal with 1 inch of snow in December (a whole inch). I toughed it out and managed to get to work, it took 4 hours instead of 2 as everything stopped. We just have more condensed snow in the south east (quality over quantity).

I’m going to get my slippers and have nice room temperature shandy.

[quote]bluebrasil wrote:

[quote]kpsnap wrote:

[quote]bluebrasil wrote:
2 years ago we had 18 inches of snow here, it was hellish [/quote]
Since I live in the Colorado mountains, this cracked me up. 18 inches would be nothing here. But I understand that in some areas, it’s crippling. My brother lives in South Carolina. If there are flurries (even if no accumulation or planned accumulation), EVERYTHING shuts down.[/quote]

ha ha, yes I see your point. I live at 300 feet above sea level (or so my car sat nav tells me)and that is by far the most snow ive ever seen. mind you, we dont use 4x4’s or winter tyres, or know how to drive in the snow, or have well insulated houses or anything else.

in South England its worse. They get almost no snow, so when they do get an inch or so, its carmageddon

Brett, however lives in Wales, where they are a bit hardier (theyre not all as tough as Brett, but more tough than in South England [/quote]

Easy on fella! We had to deal with 1 inch of snow in December (a whole inch). I toughed it out and managed to get to work, it took 4 hours instead of 2 as everything stopped. We just have more condensed snow in the south east (quality over quantity).

I’m going to get my slippers and have nice room temperature shandy.

[quote]dinkysatan wrote:

[quote]bluebrasil wrote:

[quote]kpsnap wrote:

[quote]bluebrasil wrote:
2 years ago we had 18 inches of snow here, it was hellish [/quote]
Since I live in the Colorado mountains, this cracked me up. 18 inches would be nothing here. But I understand that in some areas, it’s crippling. My brother lives in South Carolina. If there are flurries (even if no accumulation or planned accumulation), EVERYTHING shuts down.[/quote]

ha ha, yes I see your point. I live at 300 feet above sea level (or so my car sat nav tells me)and that is by far the most snow ive ever seen. mind you, we dont use 4x4’s or winter tyres, or know how to drive in the snow, or have well insulated houses or anything else.

in South England its worse. They get almost no snow, so when they do get an inch or so, its carmageddon

Brett, however lives in Wales, where they are a bit hardier (theyre not all as tough as Brett, but more tough than in South England [/quote]

Easy on fella! We had to deal with 1 inch of snow in December (a whole inch). I toughed it out and managed to get to work, it took 4 hours instead of 2 as everything stopped. We just have more condensed snow in the south east (quality over quantity).

I’m going to get my slippers and have nice room temperature shandy. [/quote]

ha ha, no need to worry, we are nearly as bad in the snow here, but FarmerBrett is an Englishman in Wales, and he (sort of) appreciates a very small amount (very small indeed) of unneccessary nationalism between us Brits.

right, must go and kill a haggis while its still light outside.

[quote]kpsnap wrote:

[quote]bluebrasil wrote:
2 years ago we had 18 inches of snow here, it was hellish [/quote]
Since I live in the Colorado mountains, this cracked me up. 18 inches would be nothing here. But I understand that in some areas, it’s crippling. My brother lives in South Carolina. If there are flurries (even if no accumulation or planned accumulation), EVERYTHING shuts down.[/quote]

Because it’s such a rare occurrence here (yes I started a sentence with because…take that Mr Bell (my school English teacher)) we don’t have the infra structure to cope with it and we always get caught out. An inch of snow and our airports grind to a halt, all our schools shut and all the milk and bread disappears from the supermarket shelves.

I’m sure it must look ridiculous to people who cope with far worse to see us struggling. I read somewhere this week that it has to be below -25 for the schools to shut in Sweden. How boringly organised and efficient are they? I prefer our incompetency, it’s charming. I like that in this day and age a few leaves on the track can still close a rail network.

Also we have some of the most inaccurate weather forecasting imaginable, which coupled with the scaremongering press causes most of us to ignore the weather warnings because half the time they’re wrong. Anyway in the end we had about 10 inches of snow, hardly ‘snowmageddon’.

We managed to get the car out today and do some shopping, but it looks like the temperature is going to stay below freezing so the snow will be around for a while longer.

One thing I did learn today is when you clear the snow off your car don’t just do the windows and bonnet, do the roof as well. I found this out to my cost on the way home when I slowed to give way to an oncoming vehicle and the entire roofs worth of snow dumped itself on the windscreen! Fortunately I was going slowly and could pull over safely and clear it off but, if it had happened on a busier road at speed it could have been quite dangerous.

BB - I thought the haggis hunting season was over. You’ve got to give them a chance to breed to know.

[quote]FarmerBrett wrote:

[quote]kpsnap wrote:

[quote]bluebrasil wrote:
2 years ago we had 18 inches of snow here, it was hellish [/quote]
Since I live in the Colorado mountains, this cracked me up. 18 inches would be nothing here. But I understand that in some areas, it’s crippling. My brother lives in South Carolina. If there are flurries (even if no accumulation or planned accumulation), EVERYTHING shuts down.[/quote]

Because it’s such a rare occurrence here (yes I started a sentence with because…take that Mr Bell (my school English teacher)) we don’t have the infra structure to cope with it and we always get caught out. An inch of snow and our airports grind to a halt, all our schools shut and all the milk and bread disappears from the supermarket shelves.

I’m sure it must look ridiculous to people who cope with far worse to see us struggling. I read somewhere this week that it has to be below -25 for the schools to shut in Sweden. How boringly organised and efficient are they? I prefer our incompetency, it’s charming. I like that in this day and age a few leaves on the track can still close a rail network.

Also we have some of the most inaccurate weather forecasting imaginable, which coupled with the scaremongering press causes most of us to ignore the weather warnings because half the time they’re wrong. Anyway in the end we had about 10 inches of snow, hardly ‘snowmageddon’.

We managed to get the car out today and do some shopping, but it looks like the temperature is going to stay below freezing so the snow will be around for a while longer.

One thing I did learn today is when you clear the snow off your car don’t just do the windows and bonnet, do the roof as well. I found this out to my cost on the way home when I slowed to give way to an oncoming vehicle and the entire roofs worth of snow dumped itself on the windscreen! Fortunately I was going slowly and could pull over safely and clear it off but, if it had happened on a busier road at speed it could have been quite dangerous.

BB - I thought the haggis hunting season was over. You’ve got to give them a chance to breed to know.[/quote]

the hunting season for the Lesser Haggis is over but the season for the Black-footed Haggis is open until the end of February. Which is why we can have Haggis as part of Burn’s night

glad your snow was “only” 10 inches!!!

[quote]bluebrasil wrote:

the hunting season for the Lesser Haggis is over but the season for the Black-footed Haggis is open until the end of February.[/quote]

There’s few sights in nature quite as impressive as the male Black footed haggis in his full winter plumage.

I should explain to those who don’t know that Burns night is probably the most important event in the Scottish calendar where everyone gathers together on the 25th of January to celebrate the life and works of the regional news anchor and presenter of the Krypton factor, Gordon Burns.

It usually involves a supper which starts with Scotch broth, a main course of freshly killed haggis served with teeps and natties (not quite sure what they are tbh) and then it’s all washed down with a wee dram of the Scottish national drink…IRN-BRU.

Then a toast is made to Lassie (Rightfully so, she was a ruddy brave dog) and then the evening finishes off with a linking of arms and a rousing rendition of Auld Lang Syne. It’s quite the celebration.

[quote]FarmerBrett wrote:

[quote]bluebrasil wrote:

the hunting season for the Lesser Haggis is over but the season for the Black-footed Haggis is open until the end of February.[/quote]

There’s few sights in nature quite as impressive as the male Black footed haggis in his full winter plumage.

I should explain to those who don’t know that Burns night is probably the most important event in the Scottish calendar where everyone gathers together on the 25th of January to celebrate the life and works of the regional news anchor and presenter of the Krypton factor, Gordon Burns.

It usually involves a supper which starts with Scotch broth, a main course of freshly killed haggis served with teeps and natties (not quite sure what they are tbh) and then it’s all washed down with a wee dram of the Scottish national drink…IRN-BRU.

Then a toast is made to Lassie (Rightfully so, she was a ruddy brave dog) and then the evening finishes off with a linking of arms and a rousing rendition of Auld Lang Syne. It’s quite the celebration.
[/quote]

now now,FarmerBrett. No need to mislead the non-Brits on this site.

as you well know, Burns night is in reference to Rabbie Burns- Gordon Burns’ Great great great great great great great great great Grandfather. Admittedly, most of (all) of Burns work is what us modern Scots call “a pile of pish” but that is mainly down to the fact that said pish is written in Scots- a language no one understands anymore- except for people who learn it whilst trying to prove how Scottish they are.

anyway, moving on…actually, the menu you describe is spot on, as is the toasting of a Lassie. The Lassie in question is not the dog!!! Seriously. That dog was American! but is in fact a reference to the Laissez-faire attitude which Burns had to life. He was a well known work shy drinker and womaniser

but yes, it is quite a night.

I have thoroughly enjoyed this thread.

Hiya brett.

You back to terrorising the sheepsies again…

The Nurse is back!!!