T Nation

Extreme Beginner

Hello everyone,

I am a total beginner to weight training so I know very little compared to many of the people here.

I am a soccer goalkeeper at 6 ft 0 in, and 155 lb. Before next fall, I’d like to get stronger without gaining too much muscle. Obviously muscle is a byproduct of weightlifting, but my job relies more on my flexibility and quickness than strength.

I have heard talk regarding fast–twitch muscle fibers, apparently I should be concentrating on these. What are they and how can I maximize my workouts in order to benefit my anaerobic strength?

Any help is very truly appreciated.
Pat

Fast twitch fibers three ways

speed work out FAST lift explosive

Lift HEAVY damn heavy 1-3 RM max

Repetition work taxing more and more fibers with each consecutive rep and set

so pretty much work out hard lift, do sprints etc.

Id also suggest reading the beginner thread above all the links and educate your self a bit theres a ton to learn available with a bit of work come back with direct ?

Phill

I’d buy the Ultimate Offseason Manual by Eric Cressey. It’s a little spendy, but it will save you from hours of research and years of crappy lifting.

http://www.T-Nation.com/readTopic.do?id=1139080&pageNo=0

[quote]HoratioSandoval wrote:
I’d buy the Ultimate Offseason Manual by Eric Cressey. It’s a little spendy, but it will save you from hours of research and years of crappy lifting.

http://www.T-Nation.com/readTopic.do?id=1139080&pageNo=0[/quote]

I would go even more basic than that since he’s a complete beginner in all aspects of training and nutrition.

Pick up a copy of Alwyn Cosgrove’s book, “The New Rules of Lifting” on Amazon.com for about $17. It will teach you all you need to know and give you some awesome workouts too!

First: I think Cosgrove’s book is a good idea, also check out some of Waterbury’s programs for the most part they are simple and to the point.

Second: FORGET ABOUT BUILDING TOO MUCH MUSCLE. You arent going to build a ton of extra mass unless that is exactly what you are trying to do. Also you can afford to gain alot of mass without interfering with your performance. I don’t know why lots of people think muscle is going to slow you down.

If your seriously worried about added mass hindering your performance, test your verticle jump/broad jump/pullup reps. All these are effected by strength AND weight

[quote]JNeves wrote:
Second: FORGET ABOUT BUILDING TOO MUCH MUSCLE. You arent going to build a ton of extra mass unless that is exactly what you are trying to do. Also you can afford to gain alot of mass without interfering with your performance. I don’t know why lots of people think muscle is going to slow you down.

If your seriously worried about added mass hindering your performance, test your verticle jump/broad jump/pullup reps. All these are effected by strength AND weight[/quote]

Think about it this way: if you doubled the strength of all the muscles that contribute to your jumping ability, that would probably only add 20-25% to your total weight. That means you can jump at least 60% higher.

[quote]sharetrader wrote:
JNeves wrote:
Second: FORGET ABOUT BUILDING TOO MUCH MUSCLE. You arent going to build a ton of extra mass unless that is exactly what you are trying to do. Also you can afford to gain alot of mass without interfering with your performance. I don’t know why lots of people think muscle is going to slow you down.

If your seriously worried about added mass hindering your performance, test your verticle jump/broad jump/pullup reps. All these are effected by strength AND weight

Think about it this way: if you doubled the strength of all the muscles that contribute to your jumping ability, that would probably only add 20-25% to your total weight. That means you can jump at least 60% higher.
[/quote]

Megaditto all the above posts. You’re not going to get slow and inflexible unless you train slow and neglect your flexibility. Big Ron Coleman (yes, that Ronnie Coleman) can do the splits at age 40+. Ernie Taylor is another pro bodybuilder that is 36+ and still does martial arts and can get the splits.

Besides, the quickness you’re talking about as a goalie is largely “first step” quickness, or quickness over short distances. Way back in the day, the Russkies took elite olympic weightlifters and test them in the sprints and some other track tests. They found that the lifters were just as fast as elite sprinters out to about 15 meters. They just didn’t have the muscular endurance or technique to keep getting faster in the sprint. If you’re still worried about getting all slow, think of NFL wide receivers, and cornerbacks, and linebackers. All bigger and muslced up, all fast, all powerful.

Train equal parts muscle growth, strength, and speed, and do dynamic flexibility training after weights and at other times in the week. Problem solved.

You’d do well to add 25-35 lb of muscle. 6 foot 150lb pounds is a string bean.

Oh yeah, forgot about Travis Mash–powerlifter at 270 lbs he did a 48 inch box jump. How’s that for ups?