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Explosive Power

I training soccer and i search more explosive power.I will make one program for 1 month for power (squats and other exercises in the gym…) then i want to training my explosive power in home.Can i make this at home ? Jump squats,jump lunges,burpees ?
Excuse me for bad english.

Plyometrics - sprinting down stairs, frog jumps, depth jumps. You can do those at home or at the outside. Just sprinting will give you good power, especially considering what you need in your sport.

Just a personal comment of mine, though: Since you’re a soccer player, you should strike a balance between your power training (general training) and your soccer training (specific training). If you were to do heavy squats twice a week and plyo twice a week and jump squats twice a week… it would most likely screw up your nervous system and put all training benefits to a halt.

Limit your CNS-intense training to twice a week (I think there was an article about it here on Tmuscle as well, look it up) and use the rest of the time for sport-specific drills. If you don’t believe me, go ahead, do plyo and max effort training everyday, but don’t complain afterwards.

Also, a 1 month period is too short for any serious specialization training. A single month gives you - assuming 2 CNS intense workouts a week - something between 8 and 10 workouts. Go figure. Make it 8 or 9 weeks if you want to see results.

OK,and I think this.I know,1 month is too short period,but i havent more time.I have 5 trainings with my team and 1 match for the week,but we have rest from 5th December to 18th January and i will make one cycle of Smolov
(short version) for this month,after this (after 18th January,when I start training with the team)i will make maybe one burpees,leg squats,jump lunges,squad jumps and depth jumps X 1-2 set one or two days in the week in the evening for balance and explosive,will i achieve this effect?I cant overtrain + these exercises.What do you think ?

considering your sport requires kicking and sprinting, I would do alot of hamstring training. I am judging by your post that you are probably new to strength training and thus would be best served by increasing general strenght of the involved muscles before beginning plyometrics.

With your soccer schedule I would say 2 days a week of lifting is fine, make sure you do higher rep stuff such as back extensions, glute ham raises and good mornings to work your hamstrings more. Do lower rep squats and deadlifts for your fast twitch fibers. After a few months of progress with these add jump squats, depth jumps, jump lunges…etc. Im sure there are soccer training books. But thats a general idea

OK,666Rich,FirestormWarrior,thank you.666Rich,your idea is to accumulate power for a few months and next I add these exercises (burpees,jump lunges,depth jumps,jump squat…)But I will train hard (squad specially,3 times per week) this one month,next I will make squads 2 times per week (3x5 or 5x3),becouse after this month i have matches (one for every week)and i will overtrain.2 times per week I will train 30-40 days,generally 2 months squads.After this i will make only squat jumps,depth jumps,burpees,jump lunges and reverse crunches,russian twist,plank,side plank,evilwheel, and paloff press for ab and waist 2 time per week.

This is my plan:
From 07.12.2009 to 13.01.2010: 3 trainings per week + possibly one-two matches with friends
squad (6x5,8x3)
Bench press/pull ups with dumbbell/Dumbbell row (one of these 3 exercises)
Good Morning
back extensions
2-3 exercises for waist and ab
From 13.01.2010 to 18.01.2010 rest before start of season
From 18.01.2010 to approximately 18-20.02.2010:
5 trainins with my team per week
and two times per week:
squad (3x5,5x3)
Bench press/pull ups with dumbbell/Dumbbell row (one of these 3 exercises)
Good morning
back extension
1-2-3 exercises for waist and ab

After 18-20.02.2010 I will train only with my team for one,two or three weeks
and after this i will make in home two times per week squad jumps,burpees,jump lunges,depth jumps,single leg squad and 2-3 exercises for waist and ab + 5 trainins with my team and one match per week
OK,this is my plan but i will accept your opinions.
Regards from Bulgaria

[quote]FirestormWarrior wrote:
Plyometrics - sprinting down stairs…[/quote]

What? Running DOWN stairs is probably a bad idea. The risks and cons easily outweigh the pros and benefits. I would never let any of my CPOs or soldiers do it in training… ever and especially under a load.

Running and/or sprinting UP stairs or a hill, now that is a sound recommendation.

Why? When a trainee runs up stairs his/her knees come to a 90 degrees and the foot is in dorsiflexion, which is perfect for developing muscle memory for ideal sprinting form. On the other hand, running/sprinting down stairs the knee is limited to a snapping 45 degrees and the foot is in plantarflexionâ?¦ all of which is not developing the ideal muscle memory, not increasing power or ROM, and thus is not going to carry over well to soccer.

When running downhill or down stairs you are increasing, exponentially, the “braking effect” on the knees, hips, lower, back, and neck (your posterior chain) that is already naturally occurring when running on a flat plane. Simply put, coming down from a stair/hill in a run or sprint greatly increases the chance of injury from the compression of body weight on the joints. This is why it is wiser to walk slowly and even zigzagging or side-stepping, if possible, your way down from a set of stairs or hill that you have just sprinted up.

Nothing builds explosive power like hill sprints or stair runs (of course pushing and/or pulling a heavy power sled is ranked up there as well).

No “zing” intended.

Some Excellent Burpee Alternatives:

Heart Attack - a jumping, push-up burpee but instead of jumping straight up you jump forward for distance, land with feet apart, then drop into the squat, thrust the legs out for the push-up, repeat. Usually, it is best to leap (jump) from the bottom squat position just after completing the push-up and tucking the legs back underneath you, however it may be easier in the beginning to stand up and then jump.

Suicide Burpees: burpees performed will standing underneath a high bar; after completing the push-up, jump up, grab the bar and perform a pull-up (all in one motion), drop down immediately into the squat leg thrust, perform the push-up, repeat.

Body Busters: aka body blasters or body breakers

Here found a link for you regarding the body busters:
www.powerathletesmag.com/pages/bodyblaster.htm

Note: unlike in the picture shown I would highly recommend bringing the legs and feet all the way back, touching your toes on the ground just behind/above your head.

Don’t know how he can claim to be the inventor of this exercise as I have been doing it for over twenty years now and the military has been doing the movement with rifles and pugle sticks for decades if not for centuries.

Hell, I have the feeling that the Romans were performing the very same movement with their Gladius and Scutum in hand over two-thousand years ago and hating it just the same!

[quote]Ricochet wrote:
FirestormWarrior wrote:
Plyometrics - sprinting down stairs…

What? Running DOWN stairs is probably a bad idea. The risks and cons easily outweigh the pros and benefits.[/quote]

Not quite. I’ll come to that in a second.

Under load? Nope. Neither would I.

Right, most of it. Some points against it, though.

  1. In most sports, you just don’t bend your knees to a 90 degree angle. Exception here are strength-sports, of course, but you seldom do in track & field sports. Even in martial arts (my field of work), 90 degree (under load) are rather a rare find.

  2. When we’re talking about explosive power here, it needs to be set to a context. The context here is soccer. So basically, we’re not exactly talking about “muscle memory” but one step further, we’re looking at the cns. While it is true that downhill sprints are hard on your joints, they also make you run faster than you could on your own. It’s simple physics, really. Running in that fashion will reduce the time your foot touches the ground - an essential skill of any sprinter. Instead of actually building power (i.e. increasing your fasttwitch threshold), you’re tweaking your time program. Similar thing can be done by supporting an athlete with rubber bands attached to the ceiling that work against gravity and take away about 10% of his bodyweight. Being lighter, you can work techniques faster (in a soccer context, “technique” most likely is sprinting), reprogramming your cns.

  3. See (2), uphill sprinting does the opposite ;). So while uphill sprinting will make you stronger, muscle-wise, it might make you slower, nervous-wise.

No native speaker… what’s a “zing”?

zing: A good verbal shot or insult, or retort to a stupid remark

As in I didn’t intend my response to be disrespectful or argumentative towards you.

I just wanted to make a point that sprinting down stairs and or hills is probably not a good idea or at least not on a frequent basis. The chance for injury is so high how could someone really justify the benefits?

Hill Sprinting or running up stairs will not make you slower and it definitely improves one’s running technique and mechanics. It demands stronger knee and arm drive while teaching the trainee to lean more forward and stay on the balls of the feet for quicker speed and turning agility. It will especially develop a very explosive start.

You can limit foot touch just as easily and more safely while hill sprinting and/or running up stairs. In fact, using your physics and argument, running down stairs or hills you are actually amplifying the braking process of the leg (foot and knee) with more of your body weight plus gravity and thus are really in a sense slowing yourself down. If not then you are out of control and falling down which is not good.

Too many professional athletes have benefited from hill sprinting and stair run training to argue that. In fact the NFL is now using a stair slide system in which their wide receivers and running backs run up a flight of stairs and then when at the top use a slide to come back down quickly and safely.

I sincerely would be very interested in any articles or publications you might have or know of that state differently and/or endorse what you are saying.

[quote]Ricochet wrote:
zing: A good verbal shot or insult, or retort to a stupid remark

As in I didn’t intend my response to be disrespectful or argumentative towards you.
[/quote]

Oh ok.

Well, you can see that from two sides. I guess, “falling down”, as you put it, is in fact what I’m talking about. Under full control, you’re limited to your time program. In a “controlled fall”, if you will, you’re not.

As I said: Hill sprinting will definately strengthen your muscles. It might, however, impair your time program. See above.

[quote]
I sincerely would be very interested in any articles or publications you might have or know of that state differently and/or endorse what you are saying.[/quote]

Ok, I’ll try to get my hands on them and come back to you. Might take some time, as I have to look them up at the uni library, if this thread’s dead by then I’ll PM you, if that’s ok.

Ok, so I did a quick google search and found a couple of things.

First, there’s Weineck, “optimales Training” (optimal training). This is a standard in the education of sport sciene students over here (ISBN10 3-938509-15-5, 14th or 15th edition). This guy’s talking about what seems to be called “neuromuscular innervation patterns” in english.

There’s a guy at the sports uni in Tuebingen (Germany), who did a diploma thesis on that very topic, there’s an english abstract. You can find that here: http://tobias-lib.ub.uni-tuebingen.de/frontdoor.php?source_opus=1805&la=de

Note especially the last passage: “The influence of maximum strength and fast strength with their fractions start- and explosive strength during very rapid movements needs to be rethought. The obtained results do not suggest that an improvement of these strength abilities also triggers an improvement of the fast neuromuscular innervation patterns. This could have two reasons. First, the time interval seems to be too short to develop the strength abilities during the movement, second, it is possible that co-ordination plays an important role, in the sense that the athlete has to be able to effectively deploy his crude strength abilities in the movement.
The findings about the fast neuromuscular innervation pattern become all the more important as the study results of this dissertation show that under normal conditions a static and developed fast neuromuscular innervation pattern is relatively stable and shows a certain resistance against fatigue.”

So what he’s implying is that through developing your “nervous innervation patterns”, you can build a fatigue-resistant form of “natural speed” - more or less regardless of your strength levels. Now, while I believe that (proper) strength training will make you faster, I’ve also done the nervous reprogramming prior to a world championships and actually got faster. Downside is, the effects don’t last forever, at some point you’ll fall back into your old patterns.

Then, there’s a book called “Neue Wege im Schnelligkeitstraining” (“New ways in speed training”, ISBN10 3-922067-92-1, actually the base of this guys thesis), that deals with the topic of neuromuscular innervation.

Right now, I don’t have those books on me, but as I said, soon as I’m in the uni again, I’ll look the studies up for you.

I think one of the issues may be that when sprinting down hill at steep inclines, like stairs, your foot strikes in front of your center of mass (over striding) which creates the braking forces mentioned earlier. On top of these forces, via motor learning you are also teaching your body to run improperly/over stride. This is very detrimental to sprint speed because it increases your ground contact time and increases risk of injury.

In order for downhill sprints to be effective and not disrupt proper sprint technique they must be on VERY low declines.

Hill sprinting exposes the body to lower forces and, as a result, allows for sprinters who are not strong enough to handle flat land forces to actually perfect their sprinting form. The reduced force allow for full hip extension when running.

Hope this helps

Alex

[quote]FirestormWarrior wrote:
Ok, so I did a quick google search and found a couple of things.

First, there’s Weineck, “optimales Training” (optimal training). This is a standard in the education of sport sciene students over here (ISBN10 3-938509-15-5, 14th or 15th edition). This guy’s talking about what seems to be called “neuromuscular innervation patterns” in english.

There’s a guy at the sports uni in Tuebingen (Germany), who did a diploma thesis on that very topic, there’s an english abstract. You can find that here: http://tobias-lib.ub.uni-tuebingen.de/frontdoor.php?source_opus=1805&la=de

Note especially the last passage: “The influence of maximum strength and fast strength with their fractions start- and explosive strength during very rapid movements needs to be rethought. The obtained results do not suggest that an improvement of these strength abilities also triggers an improvement of the fast neuromuscular innervation patterns. This could have two reasons. First, the time interval seems to be too short to develop the strength abilities during the movement, second, it is possible that co-ordination plays an important role, in the sense that the athlete has to be able to effectively deploy his crude strength abilities in the movement.
The findings about the fast neuromuscular innervation pattern become all the more important as the study results of this dissertation show that under normal conditions a static and developed fast neuromuscular innervation pattern is relatively stable and shows a certain resistance against fatigue.”

So what he’s implying is that through developing your “nervous innervation patterns”, you can build a fatigue-resistant form of “natural speed” - more or less regardless of your strength levels. Now, while I believe that (proper) strength training will make you faster, I’ve also done the nervous reprogramming prior to a world championships and actually got faster. Downside is, the effects don’t last forever, at some point you’ll fall back into your old patterns.

Then, there’s a book called “Neue Wege im Schnelligkeitstraining” (“New ways in speed training”, ISBN10 3-922067-92-1, actually the base of this guys thesis), that deals with the topic of neuromuscular innervation.

Right now, I don’t have those books on me, but as I said, soon as I’m in the uni again, I’ll look the studies up for you.[/quote]

What???

I don’t quite see how a neuromuscular innervations patterns study utilizing fast Judo pulling movements relates to plyometrics, decline running, and/or hill sprinting.

My apologies, I guess I didn’t make myself clear before.

I am interested in documentation/studies that specifically endorse decline sprinting and/or stair running as a safe and beneficial plyometric movement. Also, I would be very much interested in such said documentation that states that hill sprinting and/or stair running may or does impair timing, sprint speed, and/or explosive starting power.

Respects.

Overstriding! Thanks Alex, that was the “word” I was looking for… the ole gray couldn’t conjure it up.

Exactly. Low decline running is indeed beneficial if timed correctly and if used at the end of a running workout.

If more trainees/athletes initially utilized hill sprint traiing they would see far less inferior form induced injuries, joint impact and overuse soreness, and poor running mechanics (physiological impairments). Hill sprinting is starting to catch on in professional sports camps which is good to see.

Thanks for the input and putting it much clearer than I did. Plus you saved my sanity as I just couldn’t remember “overstriding”!!!

[quote]Ricochet wrote:

What???

I don’t quite see how a neuromuscular innervations patterns study utilizing fast Judo pulling movements relates to plyometrics, decline running, and/or hill sprinting.

My apologies, I guess I didn’t make myself clear before.

I am interested in documentation/studies that specifically endorse decline sprinting and/or stair running as a safe and beneficial plyometric movement. Also, I would be very much interested in such said documentation that states that hill sprinting and/or stair running may or does impair timing, sprint speed, and/or explosive starting power.

Respects.[/quote]

Comes down to the same thing. You’re overloading an existing pattern in order to tweak neuromuscular processes.

Today’s sunday, so give me some time to go to uni next week, I’ll look up the axact studied for you.

I see how downhill sprinting overloads the movement pattern (neuromuscular process)and forces more rapid contractions BUT these faster movements are counteracted by ingraining an improper and in efficient over striding movement pattern and thus will not carry over properly.

Hence the recommendation for shallow slopes plus such training should be done concurrently with flat land sprinting to allow for a better transfer to regular sprinting. Also steep inclines- like the stairs recommendation are very dangerous due to the high impacts. Even downhill sprinting on low degree slopes should only be embarked upon in a well trained individual. Otherwise the joints may not be prepared for the increased impact. This is an advanced training method.

Considering most sprinters not at the elite level are not even capable of fully extending their hips at toe off, one would see better improvements starting with the basics, proper hip extension strength and power.

Alex

[quote]squattin600 wrote:
Considering most sprinters not at the elite level are not even capable of fully extending their hips at toe off, one would see better improvements starting with the basics, proper hip extension strength and power.

Alex[/quote]

Basics always rule. I’m fully behind that concept. There’s just nothing like basics.
But then since we’re on TMuscle, I considered that obvious, so I was offering a different - if very advanced - perspective.

Just on a side note, I’ve actually been doing this stuff and it works. Then on the other hand, my sport is fighting, not running.

[quote]FirestormWarrior wrote:
Basics always rule. I’m fully behind that concept. There’s just nothing like basics.
But then since we’re on TMuscle, I considered that obvious, so I was offering a different - if very advanced - perspective.

Just on a side note, I’ve actually been doing this stuff and it works. Then on the other hand, my sport is fighting, not running.[/quote]

Two quick points,

First, by the nature of the question I am confident that this particular athlete can benefit from the basics and is not ready for over speed work. Usually when one is ready for advanced methods they don;t ask simple questions like this.

Second, over speed can be beneficial but it must be implemented carefully by an experienced coach. This has not been a point of contention. The recommendation of using stairs is the problem. The grade of the slope must be small because it is very easy to ruin a sprinting stride.

Alex