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Experience With Vinegar

Hey all -

The following is info I’ve found on vinegar. I also found a reference to this research in one of John Berardi’s articles, but he didn’t say too much about it.

Anybody tried supplementing with vinegar? How do you take it?


2 tablespoons of vinegar before a meal even as part of a vinaigrette salad dressing?will dramatically reduce the spike in blood concentrations of insulin and glucose that come after a meal.

A Spoonful of Vinegar Helps the Sugar Go Down
Carol Johnston is a professor of nutrition at Arizona State University?s East campus. When she started developing menus to help prevent and control diabetes, she began with a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. The diet worked amazingly well, but it involved major changes from the way people usually eat. Johnston feared they would give up and start downing Twinkies in no time. She wondered if there was an alternative.

Johnston struck gold while reading through some older studies on diabetes. Actually, she struck vinegar.

Her studies indicate that 2 tablespoons of vinegar before a meal?perhaps, as part of a vinaigrette salad dressing?will dramatically reduce the spike in blood concentrations of insulin and glucose that come after a meal. In people with type 2 diabetes, these spikes can be excessive and can foster complications, including heart disease

In Johnston’s initial study, about one-third of the 29 volunteers had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, another third had signs that they could become diabetic, and the rest were healthy. The scientists gave each participant the vinegar dose or a placebo to drink immediately before they ate a high-carbohydrate breakfast consisting of orange juice, a bagel, and butter. A week later, each volunteer came back for the opposite premeal treatment and then the same breakfast. After both meals, the researchers sampled blood from the participants.

Although all three groups in the study had better blood readings after meals begun with vinegar cocktails, the people with signs of future diabetes?prediabetic symptoms?reaped the biggest gains. For instance, vinegar cut their blood-glucose rise in the first hour after a meal by about half, compared with readings after a placebo premeal drink.

A few tablespoons of vinegar prior to a meal?such as part of an oil-and-vinegar salad dressing?could benefit people with diabetes or at high risk of developing the disease.PhotoDisc
In contrast, blood-glucose concentrations were only about 25 percent better after people with diabetes drank vinegar. In addition, people with prediabetic symptoms ended up with lower blood glucose than even healthy volunteers, after both groups drank vinegar.

In these tests, vinegar had an effect on volunteers’ blood comparable to what might be expected from antidiabetes drugs, such as metformin, the researchers reported January in Diabetes Care. A follow-up study has now turned up an added?and totally unexpected?benefit from vinegar: moderate weight loss.

Both findings should come as welcome news during this season when sweet and caloric treats taunt diabetics, who face true health risks from indulging in too many carbs.

Johnston was looking for possible diet modifications that would make meals less risky for people with diabetes. While reviewing research published earlier by others, she ran across reports from about 2 decades ago that suggesting that vinegar limits glucose and insulin spikes in a person’s blood after a meal.

A few research groups had conducted limited follow-up trials. For instance, Johnston points to a 2001 paper in which researchers at Lund University in Sweden evaluated pickles?cucumbers preserved in vinegar?as a dietary supplement to lower the blood-sugar rise in healthy people after a meal. The Swedish team, led by Elin M. ?stman, reported that pickles dramatically blunted the blood-sugar spike after a high-carb breakfast. Fresh cukes didn’t.

“I became really intrigued,” Johnston says, because adding vinegar to the diet would be simple “and wouldn’t require counting how many carbs you ate.” At first, she attempted to replicate findings by others, focusing specifically on people with diabetes or prediabetic symptoms.

When these individuals showed clear benefits from vinegar after a single meal, Johnston’ group initiated a trial to evaluate longer-term effects. It also explored vinegar’ effect on cholesterol concentrations in blood. The Arizona State scientists had hypothesized that by preventing digestion of carbs in the stomach, vinegar might cause carbohydrate molecules to instead ferment in the colon, a process that signals the liver to synthesize less cholesterol.

So, in one trial, Johnston had half of the volunteers take a 2-tablespoon dose of vinegar prior to each of two meals daily for 4 weeks. The others were told to avoid vinegar. All were weighed before and after the trial.

As it turns out, cholesterol values didn’t change in either group. To Johnston’ surprise, however, “here was actually about a 2-pound weight loss, on average, over the 4 weeks in the vinegar group.” In fact, unlike the control group, none in the vinegar cohort gained any weight, and a few people lost up to 4 pounds. Average weight remained constant in the group not drinking vinegar.

Johnston would now like to repeat the trial in a larger group of individuals to confirm the finding, but that study is currently on hold.

Why? To no one’s astonishment, the study volunteers didn’t like drinking vinegar straight?even flavored, apple-cider vinegar. Indeed, Johnston says, “I would prefer eating pickled foods or getting . . . vinegar in a salad dressing.”

Now, the scientists are developing a less objectionable, encapsulated form of vinegar and testing its efficacy. Although there are commercially available vinegar dietary supplements, Johnston notes that they “don’t appear to contain acetic acid,” and based on studies by others, she suspects that’s the antidiabetic ingredient in the vinegar.

Nice. I hope this pans out, because it is certainly cheap and widely available…

Time for an experiment!

Took it for a bit pre carb meals. Never really noticed a thing good or bad.

I have heard of people using it during Hypocaloric times and saying it blunts hunger. Allowing them to eat less in meals.

Either way It’s cheap and if you start a meal with a salad with vinegar it can be a plus in atleast one way for sure. Getting some veggies in.

Just my experience,
Phill

You will find that health nuts use cider vinegar. It may be organic cider venegar - not sure if that makes a difference. I believe Weston Price promotes this.

I think this is definately worth trying. I’ve been drinking some before carb meals when I can, but it is too early to notice the difference.

I think I heard of a study that showed it reduced the GI of white bread by 30 points. How can you argue with that?

Thx Interesting article - I usually use a couple of caps of white wine vinegar mixed into my daily tuna rations. My folks drink this cider vinegar & honey mix from a healthshop - dads addicted to it!

I’ve used this method after having a momentary lapse in willpower. If I break down and consume a bag of Newman’s Own chocolate chip cookies I will usually follow it with a tbsp of apple cider vinegar. I also read about it in a Berardi article.

first i want to say that i think red wine vinegar might have the best health benefits because we know that red grapes have some other good chemicals in them. I don’t know what these concentrations are in the red wine vinegar.

also similar to the r-ala debate, i don’t know if vinegar should be used before you take Surge because of the mentioned decrease in blood sugar and insulin in the bloodstream.

the researchers need to state whether insulin secretion is decreased or if it just gets moved a long with the sugars into the muscles faster. If these products help you lose fat is it because of this mechanism of moving the sugars into mucles better or simply because the sugars enter the bloodstream at a slower rate thus allowing natural energy expediture to burn off the calories. we all know that high fat meals slow down digestion as does fiber. what we don’t know is how these other products work, just what their affects are on blood sugar and not necessarily muscle glycogen levels. laters pk

I think that is just bunk. My background is in biochemistry. Drinking vinegar is a waste. Just gets turned to acetaldehye (same stuff that hurts your liver from drinking alcohol) then acetate and then urea. It has no effective use in the body besides possibly giving you an upset stomach and/or diarrhea.

Actually, that may just be what it is doing… making it flow through your system faster. Ever eaten a lot of sugary stuff when out drinking? Exactly.

Can anyone post some more studies, evidence, etc.

[quote]DiogenestheCynic wrote:
I think that is just bunk. Drinking vinegar is a waste. It has no effective use in the body besides possibly giving you an upset stomach and/or diarrhea[/quote]

Of course you would say this… you are a self proclaimed cynic :slight_smile:

I am glad someone here is living up to their name

[quote]DiogenestheCynic wrote:
I think that is just bunk. My background is in biochemistry. Drinking vinegar is a waste. Just gets turned to acetaldehye (same stuff that hurts your liver from drinking alcohol) then acetate and then urea. It has no effective use in the body besides possibly giving you an upset stomach and/or diarrhea.[/quote]

I thought acetic acid or ethanoic acid (vinegar) was a product of acetaldehyde. I’ve not heard of that reaction happening in reverse.