T Nation

Exercise Every Day for More Testosterone?

I was just curious if exercising every day would cause a rise in testosterone, and a potential rise in base testosterone levels. I do realize that exercise causes spikes in hormone levels, but if the spikes are constantly taking place, in the long term would hormones stabilize at a much higher level and release more?

Also, by exercise I refer to any level of physical strain. Everything from powerlifting to sprints to bodybuilding to long slow cardio, ciruits, everything

if it did cause any rise it would likely be completely negligible…

like the hormone fluctuation that big compound lifts cause… doesn’t make any difference at all

95% of TNation posts…focusing on 5% of what’s important.

[quote]Mr. Walkway wrote:
if it did cause any rise it would likely be completely negligible…

like the hormone fluctuation that big compound lifts cause… doesn’t make any difference at all[/quote]

THATS NOT WHAT INSERT A RANDOM FUCKING COACH SAID!

It’s actually my understanding that strenuous exercise decreases testosterone in the long term. Squatting can increase it for a short period, but then they can supposedly stay suppressed for up to 48 hours afterward.

Exercising in general raises testosterone just because your most likely going to be healthier if your diet matches up. But Definitly not because you exercise 5 days compared to 7 days a weeks or whatever

[quote]ToxicGinger wrote:
I was just curious if exercising every day would cause a rise in testosterone, and a potential rise in base testosterone levels. I do realize that exercise causes spikes in hormone levels, but if the spikes are constantly taking place, in the long term would hormones stabilize at a much higher level and release more?

Also, by exercise I refer to any level of physical strain. Everything from powerlifting to sprints to bodybuilding to long slow cardio, ciruits, everything[/quote]
Don’t know for sure if everyday exercise actually increases T levels, but there are a lot of benefits to it anyway. I imagine if T levels are in the low range, that a combination of rest, better nutrition and appropriate levels of intense exercise may bring things back to normal.