Estimating Max Reps From 1RM

I was wondering if anyone knows if there is a way to calculate for example your 6 rep max based on your 1 rep max.

this estimate is only an approximation due to fiber type ratios (slow:fast), the specific lift, the specific muscles, etc. however, i am sure that was not the answer you were looking for. for the average person, a 6RM is approximately 83% of a 1RM.

personally, i could never come close to performing 83% of my 1RM squat but this estimate is accurate for my bench. over time you will get to know your body and lifts better and be able to make fairly accurate estimation on your own without an “equation.” additionally, there are all sorts of calculators on the internet for the big 3 lifts. i hope this helps.

[quote]Gorichen wrote:
this estimate is only an approximation due to fiber type ratios (slow:fast), the specific lift, the specific muscles, etc. however, i am sure that was not the answer you were looking for. for the average person, a 6RM is approximately 83% of a 1RM.

personally, i could never come close to performing 83% of my 1RM squat but this estimate is accurate for my bench. over time you will get to know your body and lifts better and be able to make fairly accurate estimation on your own without an “equation.” additionally, there are all sorts of calculators on the internet for the big 3 lifts. i hope this helps. [/quote]

That’s because when you squat, you are also lifting your body. Poliquin says to consider you are squatting ~75% of your bodyweight as well, so to apply 83% to your squat max, it would be (1RM Squat + 0.75*BW)0.83 - 0.75BW. Which simplifies to 1RM * 0.83 - BW * 0.17.

1RM = 100%
2RM = 95%
4RM = 90%
6RM = 85%
8RM = 80%
10RM = 75%
12RM = 70%

These are approximations. The NSCA textbook has an entire matrix of max rep percentages in it.

http://www.nsca-lift.org/fly%20solo%20program/onearm.asp

There’s a link on that page to download a 6 page PDF showing RM%.