T Nation

Erectors Exercises - What Can I Do?


#1

First of all, can a muscle become hyooge and incredibly strong by only doing isometrics? And always in the exact same part of the ROM?
I noticed that bridging is already building something on my back...all the deads I did didn't do to much (well, at least not with strict form- super-arched back). How am I supposed to build a strong back then? I don't have access to a reverse hyper. And I don't know if weighted bridging is that useful...Altough I guess it is an option(my back gets sore, and my neck is now thicker).

btw, how did everyone build their backs? :frowning: I just can't find anything, and I think I'll develop an imbalance between erectors and abs (I work on the L-sit(well, time, because I can only hold it for a few seconds). I should get the lever in a few months...

Now, I see people doing deads with full ROM on a x ing box. This involves rounding of the back. What am I supposed to understand? Please help me here.


#2

Fact: anyone who works their way up to a heavy deadlift 500lbs+ will have large spinal erectors.


#3

Forgot: checked the training of Saxon, Hack, Hoffman, Sandow, etc... ALL THESE GUYS ROUNDED THEIR BACKS when picking something up. The idea is that they didn't arch, and spinal flexion occured when picking up something. WTF!?!?!?!???!?!?!!!!


#4

I couldnt agree more. My back has a ravine running down it from deads...mmm....deads....

e


#5

Where'd you pull that number out of?

To the poster - do you have access to a back extension bench, like the 45 degree hyper or something similar? Those work very well.

I wouldn't do heavy rounded back work - you're opening yourself up for injury. We don't really have good records of what the old timers' chiropractic health looked like. Deads and squats will deliver if you work up to heavy weights; it may just take a little bit for your leg strength to catch up to your lower back strength so that the loads you use are heavy enough to cause adaptation in your erectors.

-Dan