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Ephedrine and Insulin Sensitivity

I thought I might throw this out there for your consideration.

I’m a type2 diabetic who has his glucose levels under control. Several weeks back when paying for gas I decided to grab some of the cheap 12.5mg ephedrine tabs they had there and see what would happen at low doses. I used to eat this stuff like m&m’s years ago and was curious how it would affect me now.

I started taking 1 and a half twice a day several hours apart with some coffee/green tea. First, anybody who still doubts if this stuff works just must have never tried it. Energy galore for both cardio and weight training even at intake this low.

However there is no denying the fact that my blood sugar immediately began to rise and peaked on average 40-60 points higher than before. Sometimes a little more. This isn’t disastrous, but it is quite significant. I quit taking it and in a couple days it was back down to normal.

Just something to think about. It’s well documented that ephedrine causes blood glucose increases even in normal individuals with no regulation issues at all. Insulin sensitivity is one of the most anabolically significant considerations for people into serious training. The cons may outweigh the pros in this case.

If there’s already postage here somewhere about this I apologize, but I couldn’t find any.

[quote]Tiribulus wrote:
I thought I might throw this out there for your consideration.

I’m a type2 diabetic who has his glucose levels under control. Several weeks back when paying for gas I decided to grab some of the cheap 12.5mg ephedrine tabs they had there and see what would happen at low doses. I used to eat this stuff like m&m’s years ago and was curious how it would affect me now.

I started taking 1 and a half twice a day several hours apart with some coffee/green tea. First, anybody who still doubts if this stuff works just must have never tried it. Energy galore for both cardio and weight training even at intake this low.

However there is no denying the fact that my blood sugar immediately began to rise and peaked on average 40-60 points higher than before. Sometimes a little more. This isn’t disastrous, but it is quite significant. I quit taking it and in a couple days it was back down to normal.

Just something to think about. It’s well documented that ephedrine causes blood glucose increases even in normal individuals with no regulation issues at all. Insulin sensitivity is one of the most anabolically significant considerations for people into serious training. The cons may outweigh the pros in this case.

If there’s already postage here somewhere about this I apologize, but I couldn’t find any.[/quote]

Not sure about Ephedrine but without a doubt AAS caused my blood sugars to spike. It only took me about a day to find out what was going on but I had to almost double my insulin dose at various parts of the day to compensate. Bottom line if you are a diabetic and taking Ephedrine or AAS I would recommend checking your blood sugar VERY often. There doesn’t appear to be a lot of research in this area or I couldn’t find it anyway. I was checking my blood sugars about 6 times a day but more like about 15 times a day during a cycle. High blood sugars are also not good for fat storage which I’m sure you know. If you find anything regarding the Ephedrine and sugar levels please post! Just thought I would share my similar experiences.

[quote]goatherder wrote:
If you find anything regarding the Ephedrine and sugar levels please post! Just thought I would share my similar experiences.
[/quote]

Here’s one quick example from Pubmed emphasis mine:

Enhanced stimulant and metabolic effects of combined ephedrine and caffeine.

    * Haller CA,
    * Jacob P 3rd,
    * Benowitz NL.

Department of Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. dchaller@worldnet.att.net

OBJECTIVE: Herbal weight loss and athletic performance-enhancing supplements that contain ephedrine and caffeine have been associated with serious adverse health events. We sought to determine whether ephedrine and caffeine have clinically significant pharmacologic interactions that explain these toxicities. METHODS: Sixteen healthy adults ingested 25 mg ephedrine, 200 mg caffeine, or both drugs in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. Plasma and urine samples were collected over a 24-hour period and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for ephedrine and caffeine concentrations. Heart rate, blood pressure, and subjective responses were recorded. Serum hormonal and metabolic markers were serially measured during a 3-hour fasting period. RESULTS: Ephedrine plus caffeine increased systolic blood pressure (peak difference, 11.7 +/- 9.4 mm Hg; compared with placebo, P =.0005) and heart rate (peak difference, 5.9 +/- 8.8 beats/min; compared with placebo, P =.001) [b]and raised fasting glucose, insulin,[/b] free fatty acid, and lactate concentrations. [b]Ephedrine alone increased heart rate and glucose and insulin[/b] concentrations but did not affect systolic blood pressure. Caffeine increased systolic blood pressure and plasma free fatty acid and urinary epinephrine concentrations but did not increase heart rate. Compared with ephedrine, caffeine produced more subjective stimulant effects. Clinically significant pharmacokinetic interactions between ephedrine and caffeine were not observed. Women taking oral contraceptives had prolonged caffeine elimination (mean elimination half-life, 9.7 hours versus 5.0 hours in men; P =.05), but sex differences in pharmacodynamic responses were not seen. CONCLUSIONS: The individual effects of ephedrine and caffeine were modest, but the drugs in combination produced significant cardiovascular, metabolic, and hormonal responses. These enhanced effects appear to be a result of pharmacodynamic rather than pharmacokinetic interactions.

PMID: 15060505 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]