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Eggs & Cholesterol

Eggs lower cholesterol absorption in body
For all the nutrition newbies on here who think eggs are bad for you.

NUTRITION RESEARCHERS at Kansas State University have published the first evidence that the absorption of cholesterol is reduced by another compound in the egg, a lecithin.

The research was done by Sung I. Koo, Yonghzhi Jiang and Sang K. Noh. A peer-reviewed research paper by the three researchers, “Egg phosphatidylcholine decreases the lymphatic absorption of cholesterol in rats,” appears in the Journal of Nutrition.

Many people believe that dietary cholesterol directly raises blood cholesterol. Because eggs provide about half the dietary cholesterol in a typical western diet, the public has been advised to limit its egg consumption.

Under experimental conditions using an animal model that closely mimics human physiology, Koo and his associates found that a particular egg phospholipid interferes with the absorption of egg cholesterol and markedly lowers its uptake by the intestine. When the phospholipid is saturated, its inhibitory effect is further enhanced.

The researchers controlled experimental conditions to specifically look at egg phospholipid and its effect on cholesterol absorption.

Even though a good amount of cholesterol is consumed when an egg is eaten, much of it becomes “unavailable for absorption” in the presence of the phospholipid, Koo said.

“This may be a reason why many studies found no association between egg intake and cholesterol,” he said. The phospholipid, or lecithin, found in egg inhibits cholesterol absorption. The inhibition is not 100 percent, he said. Some cholesterol is absorbed but amount is reduced in the presence of this phospholipid.

“Less absorption means less cholesterol introduced into the blood,” Koo said. “We were able to determine experimentally that a substantial amount of the egg cholesterol is not going into the blood stream.”

The compounds are naturally occurring or derived from their natural precursors which could lead directly to development of new compounds for lowering cholesterol. Koo anticipates that regulatory barriers to such development will be low.

Koo says people with normal cholesterol and no family history of cardiovascular disease should not worry about eating 1-2 eggs a day. There’s overall nutritional benefit than harm gained from eating “nutrient-dense” eggs _ in moderation, he said. Egg contains a high quality protein than protein found in meat, milk or fish.

Furthermore, egg is a significant source of vitamins A and E, and B vitamins, B-6, B-12 and folate, which are known to lower blood levels of homocyst(e)ine, an independent risk factor for heart disease.

http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/seta/2001/11/08/stories/2001110800170400.htm

I always figured that every new that dietary cholesterol has very little effect on blood cholesterol, at least for most foods. It’s funny that people just have a hard time separating the two.

Good post Cthulhu…

And yet my doc or friends can’t believe it when I tell them I eat upwards of 6-8 WHOLE eggs per day, and my cholesterol levels, and all other things for that matter, are near perfect. :sunglasses:

[quote]eengrms76 wrote:
I always figured that every new that dietary cholesterol has very little effect on blood cholesterol, at least for most foods. It’s funny that people just have a hard time separating the two.

Good post Cthulhu…[/quote]

Yeah,it’s as ignorant as when they said fat made you fat.

Very fascinating. Does this study include carton eggs?

I was wondering if the sisco carton eggs have the same protein content as regular eggs. It says that each servering of egg beater has 6g of protein which I thought wasn’t that much. Any clue on what 1 servering of regular egg has in protein?

[quote]PpDdAiDdDdYy wrote:
Very fascinating. Does this study include carton eggs?

I was wondering if the sisco carton eggs have the same protein content as regular eggs. It says that each servering of egg beater has 6g of protein which I thought wasn’t that much. Any clue on what 1 servering of regular egg has in protein?[/quote]

6 grams. Jumbo eggs have 8 grams.

[quote]alownage wrote:
PpDdAiDdDdYy wrote:
Very fascinating. Does this study include carton eggs?

I was wondering if the sisco carton eggs have the same protein content as regular eggs. It says that each servering of egg beater has 6g of protein which I thought wasn’t that much. Any clue on what 1 servering of regular egg has in protein?

6 grams. Jumbo eggs have 8 grams.[/quote]

So 6 grams of protein is not that much at all. You have to eat a ton of eggs to get one meals worth.

[quote]PpDdAiDdDdYy wrote:
alownage wrote:
PpDdAiDdDdYy wrote:
Very fascinating. Does this study include carton eggs?

I was wondering if the sisco carton eggs have the same protein content as regular eggs. It says that each servering of egg beater has 6g of protein which I thought wasn’t that much. Any clue on what 1 servering of regular egg has in protein?

6 grams. Jumbo eggs have 8 grams.

So 6 grams of protein is not that much at all. You have to eat a ton of eggs to get one meals worth.

[/quote]

If you buy extra large eggs it’s enough protein.One extra large egg has 7-8 grams of protein.
I usually use 5-6 eggs when I eat them,so thats more than enough.
I usually add other foods with my eggs too,so it’s more than enough.

[quote]Cthulhu wrote:
eengrms76 wrote:
I always figured that every new that dietary cholesterol has very little effect on blood cholesterol, at least for most foods. It’s funny that people just have a hard time separating the two.

Good post Cthulhu…

Yeah,it’s as ignorant as when they said fat made you fat.[/quote]

Wait- it doesn’t? Shit.