T Nation

EDT+Cardio Post-Workout

For those of you who are doing or did EDT…how long is your cardio session immediately after the workout if the goal is Fat-loss? Some people told me that 20 mins is enough with EDT but the general principles with fat loss is at least 30 mins…

What do you guys think?

I think if you are doing EDT as intended that you will not have gas in the tank to even step on a f*cking treadmill.

Before you “but this … but that” … squat EDT style for 15 minutes … then get back to me.

Bastard

I did and trust me i’m still able to do cardio after that. Even if my heart pumped up as hell during 2 PR’S of 20 mins.

(That includes front squat, leg press, and so on…)

Cardio doesn’t contribute THAT much to fat loss anyway.

If you’re doing EDT hard, dieting well, the difference between doing 20mins of cardio and 30 mins is really so minsicule that it’s not worth debating.

You’re talking about at most 100 extra calories burned.

AC

I’m fairly new to EDT but I’ve trained this way a long time . . . I just didn’t know I was doing EDT.

First, I think there’s a real misconception out there that EDT has to equal PAIN and FATIGUE. Here is Coach Staley quoted from an interrview on this site:

Q: You talk a lot about thinking outside of the box and doing things just opposite to what are considered laws or dogmas. So, what’s the most mistaken notion in bodybuilding and strength training? Blije

A: Easily the most mistaken notion in bodybuilding and strength training is the idea that training, in order to be effective, must result in high levels of pain, fatigue and soreness. I’ve written a lot about this, but essentially you want to seek performance, which is best accomplished my managing fatigue. In other words, the intensity and volume of work determines the training effect. That work does create some level of fatigue of course, but the residual after-effects of training shouldn’t be the focus. Your level or soreness does not predict the effectiveness of a training program!

Second, if I’ve learned anything from the EDT articles it is that most of the old rules don’t apply. So, for example, I think weightlifting and “aerobic training” can be thought of as antagonistic. So, there’s no reason why they can’t go together. It’s all about the energy.

Third, and finally, I would recommend that you look into some of the material written on cardio workouts. Here’s another quote taken from an article on this site:

In my opinion, long sprints, 200-400m (even 800m) with short rest intervals are best when it comes to losing fat while minimizing the potential for muscle loss. Most people wanting a great physique should engage in this type of activity. Furthermore, a recent study concluded that 400m running actually involves the aerobic energy system and lead to improvement in max VO2 similar to long, slow-pace aerobic work.

I do sprints up hills (50-60 meters) and I can tell you that it has improved my overall fitness and goes along well with EDT. In fact, I sprint and swing a kettlebell at the top of the hill which is using antagonistic muscles.

Hope that helps.

[quote]grimskunk wrote:
I did and trust me i’m still able to do cardio after that. Even if my heart pumped up as hell during 2 PR’S of 20 mins.

(That includes front squat, leg press, and so on…)[/quote]

if you are still bright eyed and bushy tailed after an EDT workout, i would hazard a guess that you are holding back or doing it wrong. I didnt even have the energy to wash my hair after a good edt w/o…

[quote]grimskunk wrote:
I did and trust me i’m still able to do cardio after that. Even if my heart pumped up as hell during 2 PR’S of 20 mins.

(That includes front squat, leg press, and so on…)[/quote]

I think if you replaced the leg press with back squats you may be feeling a little more pumped…

I think what we’re really getting into here is the aerobic fitness of bodybuilders/weightlifters.

Is the fact that you are “wiped out” after a 45 minute EDT workout an indication that you gave it 110 per cent . . . or an indication that your cadio fitness is not on par with your strength?

I can only address this from personal experience. I’m not a coach or CPT.

What I’ve found is that jogging and even running are bullshit when it comes to reaching a high level of cardio fitness. Call it “power cardio.”

I wasn’t “cardio fit” until I started swinging a kettlebell (for as many reps as possible in 15 min) and doing The Bear. (Not Pavel’s Bear but the one where you Clean and Press a barbell, drop it to the shoulders, Squat and Press . . . then bring it back down and repeat the whole thing. Do as many as you can in 15 min)

So now, even if I lose a lung after an EDT workout, I recover a lot more quickly and have something left for the rower, heavy bag or whatever.