T Nation

EC: PT 7/5+7/7: Glass is Half FULL

After a great holiday with my family, July 5th went directly down the crapper. In addition to waking up with the worst sunburn of my life, my car tweaked out on the ride back to CT. I tried to salvage the day with a bench session this afternoon (which was incredibly painful in light using my bench shirt with the sunburn), but I was nearly decapitated because I made the mistake of allowing a short undergraduate intern spot/handoff for me.

There is, however, good news (and it has nothing to do with saving a bunch of money on my car insurance). In light of today’s events, absolutely nothing you can ask me will be perceived as challenging. In fact, I’m coining the phrase “psychological post-activation potentiation” in light of my day. Ask me your sore shoulder, geometry homework, mysterious rash, or whatever else comes to mind.

Hi there Eric glad everything is going well for you. My questions are hugely challenging well thats not entirely true because for me they are but most likely not for you.

I have lifted on and off for about two years now with no real set programs i was late in finding this site. My bodyfat is at 19% so i really want to get that down asap but i would like to correct some imbalance and posture issues also your neanderthal articles were fascinating. Should one goal supercede the other.

I also wanted to ask you what you felt was the best way to implement your right from the start article principles into a routine. Should I start with a total body routine or a split upper body lower body routine first. From what i have read a total body program seems best for fat loss since all the exercises will be compound and therefore more metabollically demanding, although if i am on a lower caloire diet that might not be that great but I would like some of your insite into that.

I am not asking for a training routine just an idea or two to point me in the right direction.

Two final questions does overhead pressing and vertical pulling count as internal rotation and at what point should olympic lifts or there variations be introduced into a training routine on average.

One more thing since i have so many questions do you offer any online or phone consultations

Eric,

In your D-Tap interview, you talked about balancing Benching with Rowing. Now, I usually superset Bench with Pull Ups; and this has done alot to help my back development, but my question is: Are Pull Ups an adequate row for maintaining balance?

[quote]brotzfrog10 wrote:
I have lifted on and off for about two years now with no real set programs i was late in finding this site. My bodyfat is at 19% so i really want to get that down asap but i would like to correct some imbalance and posture issues also your neanderthal articles were fascinating. Should one goal supercede the other.[/quote]

They can be achieved simultaneously. We’ve had a lot of people lean out, improve their posture, and wallop some serious meat on their backs and posterior chains while on these programs. Remember, you’re essentially training muscles that you’ve never trained; that’s some serious untapped potential! Also, with all the GPP we recommend, energy expenditure is through the roof, so leaning out should be a natural consequence if your diet is in order.

I think you ought to go with the NNM program, although you might be wise to lower the volume a bit in the beginning and do a few more reps with the maintenance work for benching (I don’t want you hitting singles until your joints are more prepared; six reps would be more appropriate for 2-3 sets).

Don’t sweat it; let me know if you need clarification on anything.

Yes, both the anterior delts and lats are internal rotators.

When these individuals have attained the dynamic mobility and structural integrity (joint health) to perform the lifts properly. They should also be instructed by an experienced coach.

Yes; you can email me at ericcressey@hotmail.com.

Unfortunately, no. The lats are actually internal rotators of the humerus, so they’ll contribute to the rounded shoulders look. Pullups will help someone who just has elevated scapulae, but they’ll aggravate the rounded shoulders appearance. Horizontal pulling is a beautiful thing; I use some form of seated row in almost every program I write.

[quote]ipjunkie wrote:
Eric,

In your D-Tap interview, you talked about balancing Benching with Rowing. Now, I usually superset Bench with Pull Ups; and this has done alot to help my back development, but my question is: Are Pull Ups an adequate row for maintaining balance?
[/quote]

Just your opinion on a couple of exercises:

Hack Squats and Snatch-grip Deadlifts.

[quote]KJ Bridgewater wrote:
Just your opinion on a couple of exercises:

Hack Squats[/quote]

Machine, bad. Barbell, better (although most people are very quad dominant in the first place and this is about as quad dominant as you can get except for knee extensions).

Awesome movement - one of my all-time favorites.

what are some of the qualities that you feel a baseball player should possess. I hope to get back into the sport asap and would like to know what are some of the most important things i should work on especially as it pretains to weight training and energy system work. In the previous post you used to answer my question you mentioned gpp training for your athletes while trying to achieve fat loss would they be some of the things you outlined in your cardio confusion or do you have some other ideas you might be able share

Eric,

Quick question regarding inflammation in my AC joint (painful when benching, lat pulldowns, etc.) I was curious the proper amount of time for applying Ice. I have been told to ice as long as tolerable to a maximum of 15 mins.

Also any recommendations to rehab this injury. Obviously, stay away from heavy incline pressing.

EC –
In your D-tap interview, you mentioned about the tweeners 6’3 - 6’ 7". I am 6’6", but not sure if I am long torsoed or long limbed. Or maybe just short torso, short legged, and big fucking headed.

What criteria do you use for this? Or is it kind of a sliding scale, ie the longer the limbs, the more of the supporting exercises you must do.

Interested in your thoughts.

Great interview, packed with sweet info.

Also, what is the name of that basement gym you werer talking about in downtown Hartford?

Tim

sorry for all the question Eric but one more thing is on my mind. my gym does not have a power rack or anything of the like, just a smith machine. should i avoid this machine like the plaque.

I also remember in another post you said that single leg variations of leg exercises would be adequate for strength and balance but you felt that spinal loading or the lack of might be a problem. should i everyonce and a while do a set of squats on the machine or maybe just load up the bar with as much as possible and hold it for a certain amount of time.

sorry Eric another question. this one relates to adjusting ones training based on limb lengths. i only stand 6’2 but my inseam is only 29inches. this makes my torso much longer should i adjust in any way

how come barbell rows seem to rarely be recommended by wsb, strength coaches, and you?

Eric,

squatting irritates my IT bands. Have you have any experience treating powerlifters that get IT band irritation with squatting?

beef

The stuff I outlined in my “Cardio Confusion” article would definitely be of value for baseball players. You’ll often hear about starting pitchers going for prolonged, low-intensity runs on the day or two after their starts in order to facilitate recovery. You can also use the low-intensity resistance training work to bring up weaknesses and address prehab needs (think rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers, especially).

There’s also something to be said about training baseball guys much like sprinters; you can learn a lot from Charlie Francis in this regard. A ton of baseball is purely linear in nature following an initial transition movement.

I can’t say that I look for specific qualities based on the sport; being athletic can be displayed in a variety of ways. Granted, different athletes will be stronger in certain movements (football guys will be better benchers, and baseball guys will be stronger with chin-ups, etc.), so training will have a definite biomechanical specificity (e.g. rotational power, lat strength, hip and knee extension in bilateral and unilateral positions) to it.

I get the feeling that I was all over the place in this response. Am I right? :slight_smile:

[quote]brotzfrog10 wrote:
what are some of the qualities that you feel a baseball player should possess. I hope to get back into the sport asap and would like to know what are some of the most important things i should work on especially as it pretains to weight training and energy system work. In the previous post you used to answer my question you mentioned gpp training for your athletes while trying to achieve fat loss would they be some of the things you outlined in your cardio confusion or do you have some other ideas you might be able share[/quote]

Hey guys,

I need to bounce for the night, but I’ll get to these ASAP. I’m back on for Thursday night, but hopefully I’ll get to them sooner.

Thanks!

I emailed you awhile back about my rotating sacrum.I told you I was doing trap bar deads off twenty five pound plates.Do you think that this is too quad dominant?I figure it is a lot of quads but it should give some good glute stimulation because of the upright position.But I am not quite parallel ,so not deep enough for max glute stimulation.

I believe I know what you think about unstable surface training for athletic training.Is it safe.For example doing squats on either side of the bosu.I work as a trainer and people just love that crap.I could see where it could be quite stressful to the ankle area.

[quote]Eric Cressey wrote:
Unfortunately, no. The lats are actually internal rotators of the humerus, so they’ll contribute to the rounded shoulders look. Pullups will help someone who just has elevated scapulae, but they’ll aggravate the rounded shoulders appearance. Horizontal pulling is a beautiful thing; I use some form of seated row in almost every program I write.
[/quote]

Hi Eric,
Does the internal rotation apply to pullups to the sternum (and variations: on rings, knee tuck, etc) the movement looks like it occurs in the same plane as a horizontal row…
Cheers

Hey Eric, in the D-tap you said something about bracing your core musculature properly, rather than “sucking it in”, as in popular literature. Can you explain this in further detail, or direct me to some place I can read more about it?

Thanks

Go Sox!

[quote]smallnomore wrote:
Hey Eric, in the D-tap you said something about bracing your core musculature properly, rather than “sucking it in”, as in popular literature. Can you explain this in further detail, or direct me to some place I can read more about it?

Thanks

Go Sox![/quote]

Yes I was just about to ask this as well. At the faclity I work at, about every other traininer yells “abs tight” when there clients do such hard exercises as machine leg curls and the pec deck