Easy College Degree?

[quote]Stronghold wrote:
Nahh, I spend all my time doing supply chain management lately.
[/quote]

What’s that like? There is a good supply chain management program at my school, I hear it is a great paying job and that the demand will rapidly increase in the next 10 years.

I am not sure about the easiest degree (classes are easier when you already have a handle on the material or when it is interesting and so studying does not feel hard), but here are some suggestions:

–See what degrees require the least amount of additional coursework.

–See which degrees have the most electives, that way you can apply more of what you have already taken and be able to choose more broadly from different disciplines. Might keep you interested, help you learn and such.

–Pick a degree that is readily recognizable by employers. If they have heard of it, more likely assume it is useful.

–I keep hearing from my students that business degrees are easy, boring as hell, but easy.

–Also, keep your eyes out for easy minors (degrees) and dual degrees. Try to maximize all the classes you have or are going to take.

I would go talk to the student services/employment center. Rather than, I hate my program, maybe start with a desire to maximize your employment possibilities by expanding your base of certified knowledge.

Good luck

Oh, and GIS is not necessarily easy - if you are good at learning computer programs, that helps - but it is highly marketable and well paid.

College sucks and most degrees probably are bullshit. I have a BS in Computer Science. After a couple years I got really frustrated with all the stupid crap and ended up failing a year because I just didn’t care anymore. But I got my shit together and ended up finishing my degree out of spite because I was almost done.

And when I got a real job I learned more in under 6 months than I did my last 2 years at school. Hopefully it’ll actually be worth it one day. You are going to have to jump through the stupid hoops no matter what you do in college so might as well pick something related to what you want to do.

[quote]skaz05 wrote:
Stronghold wrote:
Nahh, I spend all my time doing supply chain management lately.

What’s that like? There is a good supply chain management program at my school, I hear it is a great paying job and that the demand will rapidly increase in the next 10 years.[/quote]

Its tough, but I dont think it is nearly as difficult as a lot of people make it out to be. I know a lot of people who are having a hell of a hard time with it but it just kind of makes sense to me, so I guess Im lucky, ha.

It is frustrating to read what appears to be so many people confusing developing ways of learning and applicable knowledge -the goal of universities - with job training. Of course you will probably learn more about a specific job once you get it but college is not responsible for preparing you for that specific job. Cause guess what, there are more jobs out there than that one. But your ability to read technical/scientific/and non-technical material, follow presentations, assimilate new and old knowledge, apply said knowledge, deal with different types of people, how to work independently and with groups, how to develop and carry out projects, and express your results in ways that readily communicate the results to your audience are all things you learned in college studying and writing your ‘worthless’ papers.

College is to teach you ways of learning, encourage you to think is new ways, adjust to new knowledge environments, and to give you grounding in a variety of disciplines so that you can adjust and succeed when you leave/lose the job that you learn so much in 6 months at. Plus, an educated electorate that can understand economic policy, geopolitics (foreign policy), social-economic and cultural relations (i.e. domestic policy), and some history of the US and the world is far better prepared to vote in a good political candidate than a bad one–as well as being better prepared to access the results. This is something that we all should benefit from.

[quote]
CrewPierce wrote:
Soooo you’re going to college to get the easiest degree possible?

Or is it when things get hard you give up?

To answer your question I would say PRTM if your college has it or food science.

By the way failing only 10% of the class is pretty low for college. If it were a true weed out course it would be more like 40%.

Sounds like that 10% thought college was only about drinking and getting laid to me.

Chickenmcnug wrote:
I completely understand what education is about. It is about learning something. Expand your mind, etc.

In real life, anything you want to know can be looked up. College on the other hand is complete bullshit. You are tested on what kind of information you can recall off hand. Which is not how life works 90% of the time.

And you have me pegged wrong. For the last few years i have been working 8-12hour days and going to class after, then to the gym. I might be up for 16hours a day or more. I have to cram my essays and assignments in while working and hope to god nobody finds out.

I just don’t want to study science anymore. And I do not hold a passion for any subject in particular.[/quote]

What education is about:

[quote]Tex Ag wrote:
I am not sure about the easiest degree (classes are easier when you already have a handle on the material or when it is interesting and so studying does not feel hard), but here are some suggestions:

–See what degrees require the least amount of additional coursework.

–See which degrees have the most electives, that way you can apply more of what you have already taken and be able to choose more broadly from different disciplines. Might keep you interested, help you learn and such.

–Pick a degree that is readily recognizable by employers. If they have heard of it, more likely assume it is useful.

–I keep hearing from my students that business degrees are easy, boring as hell, but easy.

–Also, keep your eyes out for easy minors (degrees) and dual degrees. Try to maximize all the classes you have or are going to take.

I would go talk to the student services/employment center. Rather than, I hate my program, maybe start with a desire to maximize your employment possibilities by expanding your base of certified knowledge.

Good luck[/quote]

Now thats some great advice! thanks.

I really wish I would have known to check into my major and find out that it is worthless without all the extras like the Diatetic internship and RD.

I thought about it some more, and realized that i almost have the required courses for a nutrition minor. So not all of my upper division thus far is wasted. And if i choose a major with a lot of electoral units i might not be putting myself off that much.

I am not really too concerned with the money. Right now I have everything in life that I need and most of what I want. This all might change when I am ready to purchase a house. But for now, my aim is to get the monkey off my back.

[quote]Chickenmcnug wrote:
Tex Ag wrote:
I am not sure about the easiest degree (classes are easier when you already have a handle on the material or when it is interesting and so studying does not feel hard), but here are some suggestions:

–See what degrees require the least amount of additional coursework.

–See which degrees have the most electives, that way you can apply more of what you have already taken and be able to choose more broadly from different disciplines. Might keep you interested, help you learn and such.

–Pick a degree that is readily recognizable by employers. If they have heard of it, more likely assume it is useful.

–I keep hearing from my students that business degrees are easy, boring as hell, but easy.

–Also, keep your eyes out for easy minors (degrees) and dual degrees. Try to maximize all the classes you have or are going to take.

I would go talk to the student services/employment center. Rather than, I hate my program, maybe start with a desire to maximize your employment possibilities by expanding your base of certified knowledge.

Good luck

Now thats some great advice! thanks.

I really wish I would have known to check into my major and find out that it is worthless without all the extras like the Diatetic internship and RD.

I thought about it some more, and realized that i almost have the required courses for a nutrition minor. So not all of my upper division thus far is wasted. And if i choose a major with a lot of electoral units i might not be putting myself off that much.

I am not really too concerned with the money. Right now I have everything in life that I need and most of what I want. This all might change when I am ready to purchase a house. But for now, my aim is to get the monkey off my back.[/quote]

Glad this helps.