T Nation

Eastern Block Reps Per Set

I was reviewing some data on the training of East European olympic lifters. It is interesting to note that:

Around 57.4 - 59.4% of the sets are done for 2 reps
19.3 - 19.4% of the sets are done for 1 rep
17.9 - 19.4% of the sets are done for 3 reps

So roughly 95% is done for 1-3 reps!!!

It is interesting to note that, even if it would be logical to assume that sets of 1 rep would be the mode, because of the specificity to the athletic event, sets of 2 are the most popular.

To me that shows that they might have indirectly found out what we found: that the second rep is always more powerful.

The preceding was data from the competitive lifts, which are more technical.

Here is the data for basic lifts like the squat:

26% of the sets are for 4 reps
24% of the sets are for 3 reps
17% of the sets are for 5 reps
12% of the sets are for 2 reps
10% of the sets are for 6 reps
4% of the sets are for 7 reps
3.7% of the sets are for 1 rep
0.5% for 9 reps
0.5% for 10 reps

So 89% of the sets are of 6 reps or less and 79% between 1 and 5 reps.

It is interesting to note the small number of sets of 1 rep. Once again illustrating that you need at least 2 reps for a maximal training effect.

The moral of the story, is that it is my belief that if you want to maximize the recruitment and stimulation of the high threshold motor units a rep range of 2 to 5 reps, using max force (trying to lift the weight as hard as humanly possible) is idea. And for those number of reps a load of around 80-88% is best as it is the heaviest load where you can dominate all the reps.

Interesting. Am I correct in that you’ve also said HTMU’s have the greatest potential for growth, or no? Assuming you did say that, where do the the sets of 8-12 fall, as far as importance for hypertrophy, as compared to 2-5 max force reps?

Very interesting.

What do you mean by “80-88% is best” - should you not ramp to max weight of the day for the prescribed reps ?

Are you saying it might be better to ramp to say around 88% (still fast weight) for 2 reps and stay there for multiple sets until the speed slows down ?

[quote]Thy. wrote:
Very interesting.

What do you mean by “80-88% is best” - should you not ramp to max weight of the day for the prescribed reps ?

Are you saying it might be better to ramp to say around 88% (still fast weight) for 2 reps and stay there for multiple sets until the speed slows down ?[/quote]

80-88% of max allows you to dominate 2-5 reps. This would vary from person to person. But let’s say you ramp to 95%, could you DOMINATE 2 reps of that? Ideally, wouldn’t 80-88% be the max weight of the day depending on prescribed reps?

nice data.from which books you find this data?

[quote]Thy. wrote:
Very interesting.

What do you mean by “80-88% is best” - should you not ramp to max weight of the day for the prescribed reps ?

Are you saying it might be better to ramp to say around 88% (still fast weight) for 2 reps and stay there for multiple sets until the speed slows down ?[/quote]

That is one approach to it.

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

It is interesting to note that, even if it would be logical to assume that sets of 1 rep would be the mode, because of the specificity to the athletic event, sets of 2 are the most popular.

To me that shows that they might have indirectly found out what we found: that the second rep is always more powerful.
[/quote]

I have noticed this in my own training. Doubles on the Olympic lifts “feel” better. And yes, the second rep usually tends to be better. This makes sense since the lifts are so neurologically oriented - the first rep establishes the correct groove and the second rep takes advantage of that groove. I’ve also found similar results in accessory lifts such as squats and, in my case, especially front squats. The first rep sucks, but the reps after that are much better.

[quote]MikeTheBear wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

It is interesting to note that, even if it would be logical to assume that sets of 1 rep would be the mode, because of the specificity to the athletic event, sets of 2 are the most popular.

To me that shows that they might have indirectly found out what we found: that the second rep is always more powerful.
[/quote]

I have noticed this in my own training. Doubles on the Olympic lifts “feel” better. And yes, the second rep usually tends to be better. This makes sense since the lifts are so neurologically oriented - the first rep establishes the correct groove and the second rep takes advantage of that groove. I’ve also found similar results in accessory lifts such as squats and, in my case, especially front squats. The first rep sucks, but the reps after that are much better.[/quote]

Bingo!

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Thy. wrote:
Very interesting.

What do you mean by “80-88% is best” - should you not ramp to max weight of the day for the prescribed reps ?

Are you saying it might be better to ramp to say around 88% (still fast weight) for 2 reps and stay there for multiple sets until the speed slows down ?[/quote]

That is one approach to it.[/quote]

Which method - ramp to max weight OR ramp to max force weight (80-88%) should be used most of the time in training ? Should they be used equally or it might be more reasonable to spare yourself of neural fatigue from max weigts too often and use lesser weight more explosively and for more sets most of the time?

CT what do you think about the variation in their exercises? I hear that they would rotate out excercises VERY often, Ala the conjugate method. Do you think that this is effective compared to those that stick to doing one exercise for long periods of time? I got interested in this after readin Louie Simmons book of Methods where he talks about how they rotate the max effort exercise out every week at Westside. All the while I had been sticking to squats for weeks on end. Progressing the first couple of weeks and stalling afterward (like Louie mentioned would happen in his book).

Example lifter A
Back Squats Weeks 1-12

Lifter B
Back Squats Weeks 1-2
Front Squats Weeks 3-4
Deadlifts Weeks 5-6
Box Squats Weeks 7-8
Repeats cycle with Back Squats Weeks 9-10 and onward.

Thanks for reading.

[quote]Thy. wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Thy. wrote:
Very interesting.

What do you mean by “80-88% is best” - should you not ramp to max weight of the day for the prescribed reps ?

Are you saying it might be better to ramp to say around 88% (still fast weight) for 2 reps and stay there for multiple sets until the speed slows down ?[/quote]

That is one approach to it.[/quote]

Which method - ramp to max weight OR ramp to max force weight (80-88%) should be used most of the time in training ? Should they be used equally or it might be more reasonable to spare yourself of neural fatigue from max weigts too often and use lesser weight more explosively and for more sets most of the time?
[/quote]

Ramp to max force weight. You can then add more sets as long as they remain max force sets (all reps are powerful).

Unless you compete in either powerlifting or olympic lifting there is actually no reason to work up to a true maximum. But if you choose to do so, only do it once a month and only if you feel 100% certain that you will beat a record.

[quote]LilDaDDyDreW wrote:
CT what do you think about the variation in their exercises? I hear that they would rotate out excercises VERY often, Ala the conjugate method. Do you think that this is effective compared to those that stick to doing one exercise for long periods of time? I got interested in this after readin Louie Simmons book of Methods where he talks about how they rotate the max effort exercise out every week at Westside. All the while I had been sticking to squats for weeks on end. Progressing the first couple of weeks and stalling afterward (like Louie mentioned would happen in his book).

Example lifter A
Back Squats Weeks 1-12

Lifter B
Back Squats Weeks 1-2
Front Squats Weeks 3-4
Deadlifts Weeks 5-6
Box Squats Weeks 7-8
Repeats cycle with Back Squats Weeks 9-10 and onward.

Thanks for reading.[/quote]

Understand that the conjugate system IS based on some of the training of Soviet athletes. HOWEVER also understand that just like us in North America, there were different schools of thought among Soviet coaches. Some used a lot of exercise variations (up to 100 different exercises rotated in and out) while others (much like the Bulgarians) stayed with the basic lifts and didn’t vary that their selection that much.

So we can’t really say that there was a ‘Soviet lifting approach’.

FROM PERSONAL EXPERIENCE, better gains as made when the basic lifts are always kept in and assistance movements rotated in and out, but always depending on the strength and weaknesses of the athlete. The core movements are trained year round, but at varying degree of importance; during the early portion of the year they might be kept in but play a secondary role whereas during the later portion of the year they constitute the bulk of the training volume.

Thibs-

First of all, sorry for the length. Now, I’m not sure how familiar you are with block periodization (BP), and I’m only just beginning to understand it myself, but I have noticed that the transmutation block of a â??powerlifting BP modelâ?? is very, very similar to some of the principles of HTH that you’ve been espousing here. I know in other posts you’ve stated that powerlifters do certain things instinctively that HTH is based on (i.e. ramping, auto-regulation, the “perfect” rep), and this lead to some deeper thinking.

With the BP model, the transmutation block is preceded by an accumulation block to build a foundation of work capacity to draw from during the more intense and stressing transmutation block; itâ??s followed by a realization block to peak absolute strength.

Condensed Explanation:
Accumulation: work capacity, more metabolic, less neural, aerobic capacity, condition muscles and tendons, lower intensity
Transmutation: intentional accumulation of fatigue, increasing intensity throughout block, decreasing volume throughout block, more compound and partial movements (sport-specific for PL -floor press, board press, etc)
Realization: complete recovery between sessions, lower volume, highest intensity, very neurally intensive

Obviously this is all with powerlifting as the goal. I know Jeremy Frey, of EliteFTS, said that the non-competitive athlete, or recreational lifter, could simply alternate between accumulation and realization blocks. After reading material from Frey, as well as Landon Evans among others at EliteFTS, I have come to the conclusion that, of all the different types of training programs and philosophies Iâ??ve come across, BP may be the only one that looks at the human body as an organism, and programs the training accordingly. Our physiology is taken into account on a molecular level; with quantitative results such as the ones you posted supporting some of the principles of BP.

I am constantly re-learning that thereâ??s never a right answer and Iâ??m just trying to figure it all out myself, but Iâ??d love to hear any and all of your thoughts on any of my above ramblings.

As a closing thought, I am curious as to what different Biotest supplement you would stack to amplify the desired training effects of each block. It seems to me like Surge Workout Fuel would be great for accumulation, the ANACONDA Protocol for transmutation, and Power Drive for realization. Given the breadth of your product lines, Iâ??m sure you could make many more recommendations. Thanks and once again, sorry for the length.

GFH,
X1822

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Thy. wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Thy. wrote:
Very interesting.

What do you mean by “80-88% is best” - should you not ramp to max weight of the day for the prescribed reps ?

Are you saying it might be better to ramp to say around 88% (still fast weight) for 2 reps and stay there for multiple sets until the speed slows down ?[/quote]

That is one approach to it.[/quote]

Which method - ramp to max weight OR ramp to max force weight (80-88%) should be used most of the time in training ? Should they be used equally or it might be more reasonable to spare yourself of neural fatigue from max weigts too often and use lesser weight more explosively and for more sets most of the time?
[/quote]

Ramp to max force weight. You can then add more sets as long as they remain max force sets (all reps are powerful).

Unless you compete in either powerlifting or olympic lifting there is actually no reason to work up to a true maximum. But if you choose to do so, only do it once a month and only if you feel 100% certain that you will beat a record.[/quote]

I don’t understand… How do I make progress if I don’t challenge myself for new records ?

For example, I ramp to a weight of around 88% for 2 reps, that means I should do 2 reps althoguh I could do at least 3, maybe 4-5 with some staggering at the sticking point.

Is it actually effective stopping short of any challenge ?

It’s also tough mentally because I’d think that I’m not pushing myself to become stronger!

[quote]X1822 wrote:
Thibs-

First of all, sorry for the length. Now, I’m not sure how familiar you are with block periodization (BP), and I’m only just beginning to understand it myself, but I have noticed that the transmutation block of a â??powerlifting BP modelâ?? is very, very similar to some of the principles of HTH that you’ve been espousing here. I know in other posts you’ve stated that powerlifters do certain things instinctively that HTH is based on (i.e. ramping, auto-regulation, the “perfect” rep), and this lead to some deeper thinking.

With the BP model, the transmutation block is preceded by an accumulation block to build a foundation of work capacity to draw from during the more intense and stressing transmutation block; itâ??s followed by a realization block to peak absolute strength.

Condensed Explanation:
Accumulation: work capacity, more metabolic, less neural, aerobic capacity, condition muscles and tendons, lower intensity
Transmutation: intentional accumulation of fatigue, increasing intensity throughout block, decreasing volume throughout block, more compound and partial movements (sport-specific for PL -floor press, board press, etc)
Realization: complete recovery between sessions, lower volume, highest intensity, very neurally intensive

Obviously this is all with powerlifting as the goal. I know Jeremy Frey, of EliteFTS, said that the non-competitive athlete, or recreational lifter, could simply alternate between accumulation and realization blocks. After reading material from Frey, as well as Landon Evans among others at EliteFTS, I have come to the conclusion that, of all the different types of training programs and philosophies Iâ??ve come across, BP may be the only one that looks at the human body as an organism, and programs the training accordingly. Our physiology is taken into account on a molecular level; with quantitative results such as the ones you posted supporting some of the principles of BP.

I am constantly re-learning that thereâ??s never a right answer and Iâ??m just trying to figure it all out myself, but Iâ??d love to hear any and all of your thoughts on any of my above ramblings.

As a closing thought, I am curious as to what different Biotest supplement you would stack to amplify the desired training effects of each block. It seems to me like Surge Workout Fuel would be great for accumulation, the ANACONDA Protocol for transmutation, and Power Drive for realization. Given the breadth of your product lines, Iâ??m sure you could make many more recommendations. Thanks and once again, sorry for the length.

GFH,
X1822
[/quote]

Block periodization is nothing new. When I was competing in Olympic lifting, our coach used a block approach of three different phases:

ACCUMULATION: Sets of 6 reps were performed
INTENSIFICATION: sets of 3 reps were performed
REALIZATION-PEAKING: 3-2-1 waves were performed

The accumulation phase was actually called ‘specific bodybuilding’ and the goal was to increase the size and work capacity of the muscles involved in the competitive lifts.

The accumulation phase normally lasted 4 weeks, the intensification phase 4 weeks and the realization phase 2-3 weeks then there was either a competition or a transition phase (easy training).

The number of exercises per session was always 4, regardless of the phase. We didn’t have a specific number of sets to do, rather we used a principle not unlike Charles Staley’s EDT: he gave us a time frame for each exercises and we performed as many quality sets as we could (Staley did not invent the method… the Egyptian Olympic lifters were using that method in the 50s and so was Ladislav Pataki in the 70s and 80s).

In the accumulation phase we used more lifts than resembled the competitive lifts but different (e.g. power snatch, full snatch from hang, power snatch from blocks, etc.) whereas in the intensification and peaking phases we relied more on the competitive lifts themselves (snatch, clean & jerk).

It worked well, but we tended to suffer a lot of joint pain and systemic fatigue during the accumulation phases.

[quote]Thy. wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Thy. wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Thy. wrote:
Very interesting.

What do you mean by “80-88% is best” - should you not ramp to max weight of the day for the prescribed reps ?

Are you saying it might be better to ramp to say around 88% (still fast weight) for 2 reps and stay there for multiple sets until the speed slows down ?[/quote]

That is one approach to it.[/quote]

Which method - ramp to max weight OR ramp to max force weight (80-88%) should be used most of the time in training ? Should they be used equally or it might be more reasonable to spare yourself of neural fatigue from max weigts too often and use lesser weight more explosively and for more sets most of the time?
[/quote]

Ramp to max force weight. You can then add more sets as long as they remain max force sets (all reps are powerful).

Unless you compete in either powerlifting or olympic lifting there is actually no reason to work up to a true maximum. But if you choose to do so, only do it once a month and only if you feel 100% certain that you will beat a record.[/quote]

I don’t understand… How do I make progress if I don’t challenge myself for new records ?

For example, I ramp to a weight of around 88% for 2 reps, that means I should do 2 reps althoguh I could do at least 3, maybe 4-5 with some staggering at the sticking point.

Is it actually effective stopping short of any challenge ?

It’s also tough mentally because I’d think that I’m not pushing myself to become stronger!

[/quote]

Are you getting stronger now? In 8 weeks of training like this my bench improved from 167.5kg to 200kg… how much did you gain in the past 8 weeks?

You seem to make several mistakes:

  1. You shoot for a certain percentage… don’t try to hit 80, 85 or 88%… I just gave you these to give you an idea of what type of weight you should shoot for. In reality you work up to the maximum weight you can still dominate for the prescribed number of reps.

  2. In all my years as an olympic lifter I never maxed out more than once a month. Most elite lifters (except for Bulgarians) generally stick to sets of 2-3 reps with 80-85% of their max. Rarely do they go to the max, yet they steadily increase strength.

  3. YES you should strive to lift more weight every time you hit the gym. But if last week you lifted 90kg for 3 reps and dominated those 3 reps, and this week you lifted 95kg for 3 reps, still dominating the weight, YOU ARE STRONGER even though you didn’t have to work up to your max.

  4. IT IS NOT ABOUT HOW MUCH WEIGHT THERE IS ON THE BAR. But rather about HOW MUCH FORCE YOU PRODUCE ON EACH REP. Force = mass x acceleration. The most force is produced by accelerating (dominating) loads of 80-88% of your max, NOT by lifting maximum weights slowly.

  5. A 100kg bench press (what you are lifting I believe) is very weak. I train a 52kg, 48 years old woman who lifts close to that. If your way of doing things was so good, you’d be a lot stronger by now. YES challenge yourself… YES try to lift more weight… but only use a weight that you can dominate. Try to INCREASE THE AMOUNT OF WEIGHT THAT YOU CAN DOMINATE. Letting your ego dictate how you train is the best way of getting zero results.

[quote]sam21 wrote:
nice data.from which books you find this data?[/quote]

Science and Practice of Strength Training by Zatsiorsky

Although you can find similar stuff in the books by Roman and Medvedyev.

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Thy. wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Thy. wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Thy. wrote:
Very interesting.

What do you mean by “80-88% is best” - should you not ramp to max weight of the day for the prescribed reps ?

Are you saying it might be better to ramp to say around 88% (still fast weight) for 2 reps and stay there for multiple sets until the speed slows down ?[/quote]

That is one approach to it.[/quote]

Which method - ramp to max weight OR ramp to max force weight (80-88%) should be used most of the time in training ? Should they be used equally or it might be more reasonable to spare yourself of neural fatigue from max weigts too often and use lesser weight more explosively and for more sets most of the time?
[/quote]

Ramp to max force weight. You can then add more sets as long as they remain max force sets (all reps are powerful).

Unless you compete in either powerlifting or olympic lifting there is actually no reason to work up to a true maximum. But if you choose to do so, only do it once a month and only if you feel 100% certain that you will beat a record.[/quote]

I don’t understand… How do I make progress if I don’t challenge myself for new records ?

For example, I ramp to a weight of around 88% for 2 reps, that means I should do 2 reps althoguh I could do at least 3, maybe 4-5 with some staggering at the sticking point.

Is it actually effective stopping short of any challenge ?

It’s also tough mentally because I’d think that I’m not pushing myself to become stronger!

[/quote]

Are you getting stronger now? In 8 weeks of training like this my bench improved from 167.5kg to 200kg… how much did you gain in the past 8 weeks?

You seem to make several mistakes:

  1. You shoot for a certain percentage… don’t try to hit 80, 85 or 88%… I just gave you these to give you an idea of what type of weight you should shoot for. In reality you work up to the maximum weight you can still dominate for the prescribed number of reps.

  2. In all my years as an olympic lifter I never maxed out more than once a month. Most elite lifters (except for Bulgarians) generally stick to sets of 2-3 reps with 80-85% of their max. Rarely do they go to the max, yet they steadily increase strength.

  3. YES you should strive to lift more weight every time you hit the gym. But if last week you lifted 90kg for 3 reps and dominated those 3 reps, and this week you lifted 95kg for 3 reps, still dominating the weight, YOU ARE STRONGER even though you didn’t have to work up to your max.

  4. IT IS NOT ABOUT HOW MUCH WEIGHT THERE IS ON THE BAR. But rather about HOW MUCH FORCE YOU PRODUCE ON EACH REP. Force = mass x acceleration. The most force is produced by accelerating (dominating) loads of 80-88% of your max, NOT by lifting maximum weights slowly.

  5. A 100kg bench press (what you are lifting I believe) is very weak. I train a 52kg, 48 years old woman who lifts close to that. If your way of doing things was so good, you’d be a lot stronger by now. YES challenge yourself… YES try to lift more weight… but only use a weight that you can dominate. Try to INCREASE THE AMOUNT OF WEIGHT THAT YOU CAN DOMINATE. Letting your ego dictate how you train is the best way of getting zero results.[/quote]

Do I look like I think that my bench is not very weak ? It’s pointless to say this over the internet, but I acutally do try very hard… so what do I care if a 48 year old woman lifts the same? Should I quit lifting ? Yes, it’s embarassing, but I’m doing the best I can.

I know this : I try to lift the maximum amount of weight for the prescribed reps and this doesn’t work well. How can I possibly think that actually doing LESS will be better ?

That’s just hard for me to accept, that’s all.

[quote]Thy. wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Thy. wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Thy. wrote:

[quote]Christian Thibaudeau wrote:

[quote]Thy. wrote:
Very interesting.

What do you mean by “80-88% is best” - should you not ramp to max weight of the day for the prescribed reps ?

Are you saying it might be better to ramp to say around 88% (still fast weight) for 2 reps and stay there for multiple sets until the speed slows down ?[/quote]

That is one approach to it.[/quote]

Which method - ramp to max weight OR ramp to max force weight (80-88%) should be used most of the time in training ? Should they be used equally or it might be more reasonable to spare yourself of neural fatigue from max weigts too often and use lesser weight more explosively and for more sets most of the time?
[/quote]

Ramp to max force weight. You can then add more sets as long as they remain max force sets (all reps are powerful).

Unless you compete in either powerlifting or olympic lifting there is actually no reason to work up to a true maximum. But if you choose to do so, only do it once a month and only if you feel 100% certain that you will beat a record.[/quote]

I don’t understand… How do I make progress if I don’t challenge myself for new records ?

For example, I ramp to a weight of around 88% for 2 reps, that means I should do 2 reps althoguh I could do at least 3, maybe 4-5 with some staggering at the sticking point.

Is it actually effective stopping short of any challenge ?

It’s also tough mentally because I’d think that I’m not pushing myself to become stronger!

[/quote]

Are you getting stronger now? In 8 weeks of training like this my bench improved from 167.5kg to 200kg… how much did you gain in the past 8 weeks?

You seem to make several mistakes:

  1. You shoot for a certain percentage… don’t try to hit 80, 85 or 88%… I just gave you these to give you an idea of what type of weight you should shoot for. In reality you work up to the maximum weight you can still dominate for the prescribed number of reps.

  2. In all my years as an olympic lifter I never maxed out more than once a month. Most elite lifters (except for Bulgarians) generally stick to sets of 2-3 reps with 80-85% of their max. Rarely do they go to the max, yet they steadily increase strength.

  3. YES you should strive to lift more weight every time you hit the gym. But if last week you lifted 90kg for 3 reps and dominated those 3 reps, and this week you lifted 95kg for 3 reps, still dominating the weight, YOU ARE STRONGER even though you didn’t have to work up to your max.

  4. IT IS NOT ABOUT HOW MUCH WEIGHT THERE IS ON THE BAR. But rather about HOW MUCH FORCE YOU PRODUCE ON EACH REP. Force = mass x acceleration. The most force is produced by accelerating (dominating) loads of 80-88% of your max, NOT by lifting maximum weights slowly.

  5. A 100kg bench press (what you are lifting I believe) is very weak. I train a 52kg, 48 years old woman who lifts close to that. If your way of doing things was so good, you’d be a lot stronger by now. YES challenge yourself… YES try to lift more weight… but only use a weight that you can dominate. Try to INCREASE THE AMOUNT OF WEIGHT THAT YOU CAN DOMINATE. Letting your ego dictate how you train is the best way of getting zero results.[/quote]

Do I look like I think that my bench is not very weak ?

I know this : I try to lift the maximum amount of weight for the prescribed reps and this doesn’t work well. How can I possibly think that actually doing LESS will be better ?

That’s just hard for me to accept, that’s all.
[/quote]

The key is PRODUCING AS MUCH FORCE AS YOU CAN, not lifting as much weight as you can. Force = mass x acceleration. it is actually possible to produce more force per rep by lifting 85% for 3 reps than by lifting 92% for 3 reps. The weight doesn’t not entirely determines the amount of force produced. And the weight is JUST A TOOL TO HELP YOU PRODUCE AS MUCH FORCE AS YOU CAN. It is this force production that is key, not the actual amount of weight lifted.

BTW, if you are producing MORE force with less weight, you are not doing less… you are doing more. It is the amount of force produced that is key… produce more force and you’ll get stronger. Heck, at Westside Barbell they have dozens of guys who bench 600-700+ and half of their bench pressing is done with weights of 45-50% for sets of 3 super fast reps. Why would using 80-85% not work for you?

STUPIDITY IS DOING THE SAME THING OVER AND OVER AND EXPECTING DIFFERENT RESULTS.

Thib, you’re God in the fitness world.