During Exercise Nutrition

I am interested in seeing what everyone does for their nutrition while they train. I have heard people going with prtein plus carb drinks, just carbs, energy bars, and so on. I personally prefer just carbs, but I would just like to see what everyone else does. Also, how about supplementation during the workout…bcaa’s, creatine?

I’ve tried Surge during and after. I didn’t like that. I have used ICE (amino acid mix) during, but I usually drink water during and save the Surge for immediately after. Protein and carbs after is great.

I got great results with just 12g of powder gatorade mixed with 33g of whey in 1 L of water.

After training I consume another shake more concentrated. I have 36g of whey with 66g of gatorade mixed in about 1/2 L of water and 5g of creatine

                  Keep fighting

                          adonail

One scoop of Surge, half a serving mixed with water. Some like to double the liquid and really water it down. I’m fine with it either way.

Eating during exercising? I don’t have time for that. I eat about 1-2 hrs before going to the gym. Post-w/o is 50gm protein, creatine with simple carbs(one of those ‘4th gen’ ‘delivery systems’…;)…), 5 gm glutamine and 1g taurine.
I tend to subscribe to the notion that there is no need to ‘replenish’ during time at the gym. Lifting iron is time better spent than lifting food at the gym. I am not gonna get so depleted in 1 1/2 hrs of work (lifting + cardio)that I need it. Seems to me that the fat stores work quite well in ‘powering’ this machine for the lifting and cardio afterwards.
This is only my opinion, others might feel the need to eat, I simply don’t.

I usually have just water but on some occassions, I actually got a little hungry while working out. On such occassions, I had half of PWO drink. It definitely helps and I felt that I had more energy towards the end of my workouts. More importantly, it can help reduce muscle catabolism. Basically, do it if you can otherwise just get a PWO drink asap.

G

Half serving of 6% Surge during and another 6% Surge immediately after.

Well, I EAT, or drink actuallly, EVERY WORKOUT & PWO. That improved my body composition, as well as health (!) and endocrine system and of course, my performance. I gained LBM, lost some FAT and became an animal :slight_smile:

If you’re interested, I have lots of studies and researches supporting this.

I’ve never felt better as when I sip half my Surge during workout and drink half after. It’s a superior supplement. I also like not having to mess with mixing everything myself and worrying about the correct ratio of carbs, protein, BCAAs, etc.

John Berardi explained why supplementation can be beneficial both during and after your workout in his ‘Precision Nutrition’ article.

[quote]fast&furious wrote:
Well, I EAT, or drink actuallly, EVERY WORKOUT & PWO. That improved my body composition, as well as health (!) and endocrine system and of course, my performance. I gained LBM, lost some FAT and became an animal :slight_smile:

If you’re interested, I have lots of studies and researches supporting this.[/quote]

Thanks for the offer… But, I have read quite a bit on this site and have a ‘small’ amount of experience about how my body reacts to the stress of work outs and recovery.
I am about 190 lbs… 9 or 10% BF… 5’ 10"(178cm for us metric weinies)
I have yet to get any images from the shoot I was involved in during the summer, no big deal I am not expecting to make much of a splash as a model anyhow; just mentioned it so that ya can suspect that apparently I look pretty good.
My point is that if you need to eat, then it is your choice. But, just because it is suggested that you do doesn’t mean that it is a good or necessary part of your work out. Everyone is different. It is all about how YOU get better… and how you do that is different than the way I do.

Very interesting thread… I just wanted to reinforce that if you do your homework, you will find that you have plenty of glycogen stored (up to 400 cals worth in the liver) that will certainly get you through tough resistance workout. Your body releases glucagon when this stored glycogen is to be used to fuel exercise. So, you don’t necessarily need a mid-w/o shake.

Plus, remember that even if you take a “quick” sugar like dextrose, it is in your blood quickly, but your body has re-routed your blood supply to working muscles. Therefore, you could cramp or get nauseated if your w/o is rigous enough. I say this because sipping Surge during the w/o may work for some, but may not be needed by most.

You especially don’t necessarily need a during the w/o drink if you are focused on maximal strength. This is because your w/o should be designed such that the over-all volume isn’t that taxing. The individual reps should be hard, but you shouldn’t feel “out of it” after a strength focused w/o. If you are going for a GVT or some type of extreme hypertrophy or glycogen depleting w/o, then the mid-w/o shake might help. Otherwise, a light liquid snack 45-60 minutes prior and a PWO shake immediately after is plenty of nutrition to optimize recovery.

From personal experience, I’m mostly maximally strength concerned, but mix in some hypertrophy work. I get nauseated if I consume a shake to close to the w/o or mid-w/o. But, slowly sipping the PWO shake is fine.

Bottom line - you have plenty of stored glucose (glycogen) to w/o with. So, you can experiment with different timings, but I don’t see a physiological need for a mid-w/o shake.

TopSirloin

With all due respect to certain posters, physiological processes are remarkably consistent across populations. Nutritional requirements, tolerance for volume, frequency, intensity of exercise, etc., for example, have much greater variance.

However, the idea that “whatever you think works for you is just as valid as any other idea” is silly.

What John Berardi talks about in his article is basically physiological responses to feeding protocols. These are going to be VERY CONSISTENT among all persons, not withstanding some genetic abnormality or disease condition. For example, research indicates that consuming carbs during exercise actually INCREASES fat oxidation afterwards–this is going to happen no matter what your pet theory may be.

Furthermore, consuming calories and protein during exercise apparently increases protein turn-over rates. Now, this may sound bad but it actually can be very beneficial, because the higher the protein degradation rates during and immediately after exercise the greater the protein synthesis rates during the supercompensation phase later. This will be true no matter how much you don’t want it to be.

People really should read the Berardi article before they decide they “don’t need to do that”. He makes a very convincing case, and I have changed my long standing beliefs and practices in response. His article does challange many strongly held beliefs, and I suspect that is the real point of resistence.

Crowbar

[quote]crowbar524 wrote:
With all due respect to certain posters, physiological processes are remarkably consistent across populations. Nutritional requirements, tolerance for volume, frequency, intensity of exercise, etc., for example, have much greater variance.

However, the idea that “whatever you think works for you is just as valid as any other idea” is silly.

What John Berardi talks about in his article is basically physiological responses to feeding protocols. These are going to be VERY CONSISTENT among all persons, not withstanding some genetic abnormality or disease condition. For example, research indicates that consuming carbs during exercise actually INCREASES fat oxidation afterwards–this is going to happen no matter what your pet theory may be.

Furthermore, consuming calories and protein during exercise apparently increases protein turn-over rates. Now, this may sound bad but it actually can be very beneficial, because the higher the protein degradation rates during and immediately after exercise the greater the protein synthesis rates during the supercompensation phase later. This will be true no matter how much you don’t want it to be.

People really should read the Berardi article before they decide they “don’t need to do that”. He makes a very convincing case, and I have changed my long standing beliefs and practices in response. His article does challange many strongly held beliefs, and I suspect that is the real point of resistence.

Crowbar[/quote]

Actually…my idea is that what ever makes you ‘feel’ better… whatever makes you ‘feel’ that you have done a good work out, is what drives you to the gym. Can’t deny that what Mr Berardi says isn’t true, it is just that I don’t feel that I need to do it. I might be robbing myself of some small advantage regarding fat loss and/or muscle gain, but I don’t like to eat during a work out.
Just cause an ‘authority figure’ says that it would help somewhat doesn’t mean that I am going to blindly do it.
Thanks for the precis on the article crowbar, but the initial post was asking for opinions on nutrition during a work out. I merely gave mine…

[quote]mowgli1959 wrote:
but I don’t like to eat during a work out.
…[/quote]

Um, drinking Surge or any properly formulated training drink is just like drinking water. You’re not “eating”, you’re drinking. And the benefit is enourmous. No one is suggesting you chow down on chicken breasts and eat a steaming bowl of oatmeal between sets! :slight_smile:

I don’t know… I’m only in the gym for an hour… and I can’t drink very much during that time. I’m either still doing chins and don’t want more weight or I’m about to do more deads or squats and don’t want anything in my stomach.

So, I’m going to have to muddy the water and suggest that perhaps doing whatever lets you maximize your workout, even if it is somewhat psychological, will also have a benefit.

If I want nutrients entering my bloodstream during the workout I’ll choose to eat or drink something far enough in advance, unless I can somehow magically achieve stupendous progress.

Anyway, don’t get too preachy with the science, the science of today is always improved upon by the science of tomorrow.

CrowBarr where’d you get this?

Cheers

[quote]crowbar524 wrote:
Furthermore, consuming calories and protein during exercise apparently increases protein turn-over rates. Now, this may sound bad but it actually can be very beneficial, because the higher the protein degradation rates during and immediately after exercise the greater the protein synthesis rates during the supercompensation phase later. This will be true no matter how much you don’t want it to be.
Crowbar[/quote]

Another interesting point is that muscle protein breakdown actually stimulates protein synthesis, because it elevates serum amino acid levels (strange but true).

Also, during resistance exercise with normal liver/muscle glycogen, the benefit of a during workout carb drink will come from insulin suppression of protein breakdown, not additional energy supply.

Cheers

[quote]David Barr wrote:
Another interesting point is that muscle protein breakdown actually stimulates protein synthesis, because it elevates serum amino acid levels (strange but true).

Also, during resistance exercise with normal liver/muscle glycogen, the benefit of a during workout carb drink will come from insulin suppression of protein breakdown, not additional energy supply.

Cheers[/quote]

Ok,but is better with or without nutrition while they train?

All I know is that I eat a substantial P+C meal when I wake up, which is half an hour before I hit the gym. But if I don’t sip a small carbohydrate drink (32g carbs) during my workout which may last up to an hour, then I can feel pretty weak about halfway through my workout.

Crowbar and all-

I DID read John Berardi!!! I really, really like his work and I recommend him all the time!

Still, personally speaking, I have built a decent body from hitting just pre and post w/o meals. Not to mention, I’m sure I could find “science” to back me up saying that you don’t necessarily NEED a mid w/o meal. However, I don’t want to debate so much, but rather I want to share my (our) experiences and learn from each other.

As I see it, it takes 20-30 minutes for a liquid pre-shake to get into the blood. If I start my w/o about 30 minutes after that snack, I have aminos and glucose just entering the blood. They probably will be sustained release for another 30 minutes. As a previous poster correctly pointed out and I believe I have as well, the body will be using glycogen from the liver mostly to fuel exercise (not from the shake). So, the pre-shake is really just jump starting my recovery, since the body already has aminos being used as muscle catalysts and stored glucose for energy. The pre-shake will be basically haulting catabolism and kick-starting protein synthesis during, but mostly AFTER the w/o.

Now, a smart lifters w/o is done with his/her bout in well under an hour (if not, then you NEED a mid w/o shake!!!). Hopefully closer to 45 minutes. So, just as their pre-shake fuel has run out, they are done with the lift and consuming the PWO shake! They practically don’t have any laspses in nutrition by properly timing a pre-pre meal (3-4 hours before training), the pre-shake 30 min before, than ANOTHER liquid shake not even an hour later! Their body has PLENTY of protein and carbs, that a mid w/o shake is just not necessary.

Remember again, that blood is re-routed to working muscles during semi-intense/intense training. It still takes blood around the stomach to digest even a small meal, so this can depending on the person, interupt a w/o. As someone mentioned, if you are hitting an intense leg day you might even want to consume that pre-shake 45-60 minutes before lifting to keep from getting GI upset. Then, taking a few minutes afterward to relax befor the PWO. You body has energy reserves and short-term aminos reserves, so we don’t have to eat every 10 mintes, whether lifting or not!

What about fasting at night?!?! Shouldn’t we all be getting up after 4 hours of sleep to eat a big chicken salad?!?! NOPE! Constant deep sleep is more important than that meal. Plus, you body is VERY protein sensitive upon waking, so your breakfast will be a big anabolic kick!

So, ask questions, get educated, but I would still use some common sense as your guide at the end of the day.

TopSirloin