T Nation

Drugs Necessary For Pro Bodybuilding?


#21

You look great. Scratch that, you look phenomenal. So cut this shit out, dude. You posted about going to the doctor bleeding from your eyes from a cycle before. You’re going to kill yourself at a young age. Your parents are NOT 100% aware of anything, because if they were, they’d literally be killing their child. Words cannot explain how selfish, immature and ridiculous you’re being by laughing about shaving years off of your life, when you’ve barely even lived life, and when there are so many other people who are dealt shitty hands and have to fight to stay alive.


#22

I’m just the result of a 15 year old who looked up to Dallas McCarver and Rich Piana, just kidding bro :sweat_smile:

I definitely understand you man, I would honestly trade my life expectancy with a child who isn’t as fortunate to have the opportunity to live as long as me. I just have the mindset to where I’m living life at full blast (no pun intended) even if that means I’m going to die earlier. And hey, that very well may change in the future and I might regret it but that’s a part of life. All do respect, I agree with everything you say, but it’s just not my lifestyle


#23

It actually will change. It’s biology. Right now your brain isn’t formed enough to understand consequences the way you will be able to in six or seven years. It’s normal. Why do you think we put rifles in the hands of 19 year olds instead of 42 year olds? The 42 year old will ask too many questions. The 19 year old cannot understand the concept of his own mortality yet. I’m not judging you. You’ve obviously dedicated yourself to this and so far it’s working amazingly well. Just know that you won’t want this forever. So try to plan for at least a little bit of that future.


#24

Hey, that can’t be true because I was 19 when I joined Marine Corps infantry and I knew exactly what I was…oh wait. Shit.


#25

I disagree with this. I think many teenagers can certainly comprehend consequences and their own mortality, we just tend to not care as our biological makeup is hardwired for us to think similarly to that of our very distant ancestors, who as teenagers didn’t have the time to think of consequences when they were hunting for food or fighting over territory or whatever people did way back then.

I’ll give you an example of my thought process when making a stupid, irrational, teenage decision.

Slayer is showing for their final tour in Aus, should Unreal24278 go? (This was a week ago)

  • Its a licensed venue, people will be drinking, I will probably be drinking

My brains answer “slayeerrrrrrrrrrr”

  • I’m going by myself, never been to a concert before, there’s gonna be tons of very drunk and/or very high individuals looking for trouble… And I’ll be on my own

My brains answer “SLAYEEERRRRRRRR”

  • I have school the next day

My brains answer “FUCKING SLAYERRRRRRR”

Later on, at the concert (didn’t get to see Slayer unfortunately, different story though)

Should unreal24278 jump in the mosh pit

My thought process

  • I could get hurt

My brains answer
“Gogogogogogo yesyes YEET”

  • what if I sustain a serious injury, I’m by myself

My brains answer
“Wooooooot YEEEEEEET moshpiiiiiiitttt”

We comprehend the consequences (at least I do) and think about them in depth, we just make stupid, impulsive decisions.


#26

Comprehending consequences and comprehending one’s own mortality are two completely different things. You can’t “tend not to care” about your mortality if you properly comprehend it. It’s frustrating to hear that your brain isn’t done developing, but it isn’t, and unless you think brain development has no effect on thinking processes, then you can understand how things might change by the time you’re 25+.


#27

Agreed. and it’s hard to understand this as well when your young. When I Was 16 I was living on my own supporting myself etc much more “grown up” in a lot of ways then kids my age. Looking back from 16-25 was a huge change. Even now at 29 from 25-29 a lot has changed on how I think. I can imagine even now when I hit 35 il look back and be surprised at how I think now. It’s just part of the aging process and brain development. I don’t think there is any set age you hit where your done. Altho I do think when you get into your late 20s you start getting a better picture of exactly what your future is gonna hold and are better able to plan for it.

Which brings me back to this post. I can’t help but imagine when this young man is 30 and possibly has a family etc how sad it’s gonna be knowing that he might only have another 20 years on this earth to watch his kids grow up.


#28

I am fully aware my brain hasn’t finished developing, this concept doesn’t irritate me in the slightest. What I disagree with though is the notion that teenagers cannot comprehend consequences. I can certainly comprehend the consequences of my actions (before, during and after) they’ve been acted upon.

The same can be said about my mortality, I certainly don’t think I’m invincible. If someone put a gun in my hands and asked me to shoot, you’re damn right I’d ask questions…

What I do believe, is that my decision making processes will mature, as I can be hasty and impulsive when it comes to making decisions that should probably be more thought out and carefully considered.


#29

The brain development thing might scientifically be broadly correct, but I have known many young people that display more common sense and intelligence with their decisions than the majority of 30 year old adults.
When many people are young they seem to act wilfully ignorant of the reality around them. Is it down to brain maturity, or just not having learned the lessons of life the hard way yet? I can’t say for sure, but some people never seem to learn no matter how old they are.

I sometimes think the brain development argument is an excuse used by politicians and school mame types to infantilise all young adults, because of a minority of poorly behaved individuals. Driving licencing laws in Australia, drinking of alcohol.