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Dropped 225 On My Chest Today

Doing bench press today. 225 is well within my range (good for about 4-5 reps). I was in the middle of the 3rd rep when my right wrist “popped” or rolled and I dropped the weight on my chest. I caught it on the rebound and some guys came over and helped me get it racked. No injury or anything but I’m concerned about my wrist now.

Is this a technique issue or a wrist strength issue? This happend once before with 250lbs many years ago. When I say it popped, I don’t mean it made a sound as in an injury, it just suddenly rolled forward and the weight came out…

Get gloves with good wrist straps. I go heavy by myself at home and you just scared the crap out of me. I have had my wrist want to roll but the gloves with the wrist straps have saved me.

I can imagine your gonna be pretty nervous lifting that weight for awhile!!!

Thank god my bench has good spotters on it. 290 would be hard to get off of my chest by myself if I got stuck!

Which is why I do pretty much all my lifting in the power cage, especially if I’m by myself.

Were you using an open or closed grip. If it was open, switch to closed. You may not have the stability, proprioception, and strength to handle that weight with an open grip.

Also, refer back to the 5/11 Cool Tip. It may help you out with overall strength of your bench press and prevent this from occurring again:

Grip It and Press It!

Proper maximal bench press technique can be summarized in one word: control. The correct way to do the bench press is to lower the weight to the chest in a controlled motion. Note the motion is described as controlled, not slow. The bar can still descend at a rapid pace, but at a controlled rapid pace. One of the best cues to learn how to maintain control is in grip strength. The harder the bar is squeezed, the more control is gained over the bar. Bench numbers can be increased by up to 10% simply by improving grip strength!

-LH

[quote]PGJ wrote:
Doing bench press today. 225 is well within my range (good for about 4-5 reps). I was in the middle of the 3rd rep when my right wrist “popped” or rolled and I dropped the weight on my chest. I caught it on the rebound and some guys came over and helped me get it racked. No injury or anything but I’m concerned about my wrist now.

Is this a technique issue or a wrist strength issue? This happend once before with 250lbs many years ago. When I say it popped, I don’t mean it made a sound as in an injury, it just suddenly rolled forward and the weight came out… [/quote]

This is almost certainly a technique issue and I’m not sure I agree with the gloves with straps kinda deal. To that poster, I would say if you don’t always bench in a power rack while along at home (with weight you couldn’t get off your chest) then you are waiting to become a statistic - gloves or not. Most weightlifting related fatalities involve the bench press and asphyixiation…nuff said.

I believe your problem is just an issue of “staying tight” and proper wrist position. I too have felt this thing you experienced if I’m not paying attention or get out of the groove in that direction. I doubt its a wrist strength or injury kinda thing but then again, we’re just chatting over the internet so its hard to tell.

I know not much advice was given in this post but maybe some food for thought about benching w/o spotters. Personally, I work out at home - if I’m benching something I can only handle for those few reps, I’m in the power rack. If you can’t find a spotter, I suggest you do the same. And by the way, I’ve also seen people miss the lift the opposite direction.

You didn’t mention if you were using a thumbless grip? Anway, the best advice is to understand you never know what can occur when you’re under a heavy load. Better to be safe than sorry.

And one last cautionary tale; I know of a young guy, colleged degreed, on his way to becoming a laywer, some BB modeling type work, etc…world and future in his hands…anyway, he’s squatting IN THE SMITH MACHINE at Gold’s Gym in LA…Yes, THE Golds. His knee gives out under a load of about 315 and he either is using a smith that doesn’t have safety stops at the bottom or he didn’t set them - I forget…end result? The bar crushed him, came down on his neck and he’s a quad now. TRUE STORY.

Bottom line; use the rack or have a spotter!

Good luck to you.

Steve

Unfortunately, my gym does not have a rack of any sort. I’m military and use the cheesie base gym. The guy that runs the place is some crusty old retired dude who doesn’t think we need one (and believe me I’ve tried to convince him otherwise).

It happened so fast a spotter would not have prevented it. I was using a “thumbed” grip. My goal is to get up to 315. Major loss of “cool points” today. I think I just need to be more careful on my form. I remember hitting a bit of a sticking point half way up when my wrist gave way.

[quote]PGJ wrote:
Unfortunately, my gym does not have a rack of any sort. I’m military and use the cheesie base gym. The guy that runs the place is some crusty old retired dude who doesn’t think we need one (and believe me I’ve tried to convince him otherwise).

It happened so fast a spotter would not have prevented it. I was using a “thumbed” grip. My goal is to get up to 315. Major loss of “cool points” today. I think I just need to be more careful on my form. I remember hitting a bit of a sticking point half way up when my wrist gave way. [/quote]

At your sticking point you probably shifted forward out of the groove for some reason - gloves with straps would just ensure that your hands are still attached to the bar after it hit your chest LOL :).

In the future, I’d say get a spotter. And no, not much can happen too fast for a good spotter - now I can’t speak for most of those gym jack offs giving half assed spots - but someone that knows what their doing could have saved ya.

You can also try heavy floor presses in lieu of the heavy bench pressed if you don’t have a spotter but then again, these are usually performed in the rack - depending on your limb length, mine are long, the ROM is not that much different than a regular bench press and the 45’s will clear your neck and upper chest area if you fail.

Use a spotter! :slight_smile:

[quote]TheBodyGuard wrote:
PGJ wrote:
Unfortunately, my gym does not have a rack of any sort. I’m military and use the cheesie base gym. The guy that runs the place is some crusty old retired dude who doesn’t think we need one (and believe me I’ve tried to convince him otherwise).

It happened so fast a spotter would not have prevented it. I was using a “thumbed” grip. My goal is to get up to 315. Major loss of “cool points” today. I think I just need to be more careful on my form. I remember hitting a bit of a sticking point half way up when my wrist gave way.

At your sticking point you probably shifted forward out of the groove for some reason - gloves with straps would just ensure that your hands are still attached to the bar after it hit your chest LOL :).

In the future, I’d say get a spotter. And no, not much can happen too fast for a good spotter - now I can’t speak for most of those gym jack offs giving half assed spots - but someone that knows what their doing could have saved ya.

You can also try heavy floor presses in lieu of the heavy bench pressed if you don’t have a spotter but then again, these are usually performed in the rack - depending on your limb length, mine are long, the ROM is not that much different than a regular bench press and the 45’s will clear your neck and upper chest area if you fail.

Use a spotter! :slight_smile:
[/quote]

Heavy floor presses. I guessing that’s push-ups with weight on your back. Am I correct? That’s a good idea. Might give them a try. Some times when I go to the gym I’m the only one in there and the lady that works the desk is handicapped. I’m ready to go purchase my own rack and donate it to the gym. I still can’t convince them that a simple $500 investment will make a huge difference in safety. They are still of the mindset that “squats are bad”.

Spotter.

Make sure your spotter knows your history and is ready. There is no shame in having the spotter positioned with hands on the bar (or riding under) at all times. They must stand firm & ready for an accident at all times. You, my friend, have had a “near miss”. Next time, you may not be so lucky.

(Note: I’m not being naggy like a mother. Just a concerned friend.)

Floor press is a bench press performed on the ground instead of a bench. The ROM is a little shorter than normal benches. You usually pause at the bottom too. Weighted push ups are okay too though. When you’re benching try and focus on “ripping the bar apart” to keep your grip tight.

No, the floor press is a press, just like the bench, only from the floor.

Also, just a thought.

Are there any shoulder stability or scapular position issued that may have caused you to inadvertently round out the push?

You may want to examine this before you go for a new max.

[quote]FamilyMan wrote:
Spotter.

Make sure your spotter knows your history and is ready. There is no shame in having the spotter positioned with hands on the bar (or riding under) at all times. They must stand firm & ready for an accident at all times. You, my friend, have had a “near miss”. Next time, you may not be so lucky.

(Note: I’m not being naggy like a mother. Just a concerned friend.)[/quote]

There’s a guy in my gym that benches >300 that’s asked me to spot for him from time to time.

I do it, but I’m paranoid about it. I stagger my feet so I’ll have some balance if anything happens and keep my hands near the bar during the lift.

All I can think of is that video of the guy dropping massive weight onto himself and it just crushes him… yikes!

Without help, how the hell could one person put heavy weight on their back when doing pushups???

[quote]SkyzykS wrote:
Also, just a thought.

Are there any shoulder stability or scapular position issued that may have caused you to inadvertently round out the push?

You may want to examine this before you go for a new max.
[/quote]

I have had some pretty bad shoulder pain that has kept me from benching for about a year. No pain now and bench feels really good (I’ve been benching for about a month, but nothing over 185lbs just to test the shoulder). Maybe I was just out of practice. I did a single 245 this weekend just to see where I was at after the layoff. Felt strong.

[quote]vroom wrote:
FamilyMan wrote:
Spotter.

Make sure your spotter knows your history and is ready. There is no shame in having the spotter positioned with hands on the bar (or riding under) at all times. They must stand firm & ready for an accident at all times. You, my friend, have had a “near miss”. Next time, you may not be so lucky.

(Note: I’m not being naggy like a mother. Just a concerned friend.)

There’s a guy in my gym that benches >300 that’s asked me to spot for him from time to time.

I do it, but I’m paranoid about it. I stagger my feet so I’ll have some balance if anything happens and keep my hands near the bar during the lift.

All I can think of is that video of the guy dropping massive weight onto himself and it just crushes him… yikes![/quote]

A spotter isn’t going to be much use when a dumb-ass like myself drops 225lbs. It happened so fast that even if the spotter was completely under it, it would have just pulled him over on top of me or he would have let go. You’d have to seriously t-bag a guy and really squat down over the guys face to get proper leverage to catch 225lbs.

Like those big spotters on each end of the bar in competition are going to catch 800lbs in free-fall. Maybe slow it down a little or catch it on the rebound.

What really surprised me was even though I had 225lbs resting on my chest, I was easily able to quickly slide the bar down to my stomach and sit up.

[quote]blue9steel wrote:
Which is why I do pretty much all my lifting in the power cage, especially if I’m by myself.[/quote]

Damn good advice! You can’t lift if you’re hurt. Avoiding injuries is one of the most ‘anabolic’ things you can do.

HH

[quote]JimmyJamesMD wrote:
Without help, how the hell could one person put heavy weight on their back when doing pushups???[/quote]

Weighted vest (X-Vest) or just a backpack filled with weight.

[quote]PGJ wrote:
SkyzykS wrote:
Also, just a thought.

Are there any shoulder stability or scapular position issued that may have caused you to inadvertently round out the push?

You may want to examine this before you go for a new max.

I have had some pretty bad shoulder pain that has kept me from benching for about a year. No pain now and bench feels really good (I’ve been benching for about a month, but nothing over 185lbs just to test the shoulder). Maybe I was just out of practice. I did a single 245 this weekend just to see where I was at after the layoff. Felt strong.

[/quote]

That history doesn’t sound too good. The pain can go away due to healing of the accute injury, but if the root cause is along the lines of imbalance/instability, it could be an injury waiting to happen.

Can’t say that this is actualy the case, but I would definitely look further in to it. Try to find a good s&c coach, or maybe someone like Cressey or Robertson that could give some better pointers.

[quote]JimmyJamesMD wrote:
Without help, how the hell could one person put heavy weight on their back when doing pushups???[/quote]

Someone mentioned x-vest; yup! Load that baby up to 84 lbs and better yet? Do your push ups with some power rings and come talk to me! You’ll be pleasantly surprised and, humbled!