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Dr. Squat's 80Day PLing Cycle's

Hi, first time post here. I’m 34 years old and just started with weights about 10 months ago. I was a 200 pound weakling (bench 165, squat 185, dead 240) but am starting to make some progress (weight now 205, bench 210, squat 260, dead 305).

I’ve been eating up all of the info I can from many sources, and find myself trying to focus primarily on powerlifting. I found a great looking workout program but info on assistance work is severely lacking.

Has anyone here tried this program?

Looking at the intense volume, could anyone suggest some assistance work for me? I feel too much assistance on this could tip me into the ‘overtraining zone’.
Ideas with rep and set ranges would be helpful.

Thanks!!

[quote]rlawrence wrote:
Hi, first time post here. I’m 34 years old and just started with weights about 10 months ago. I was a 200 pound weakling (bench 165, squat 185, dead 240) but am starting to make some progress (weight now 205, bench 210, squat 260, dead 305).

I’ve been eating up all of the info I can from many sources, and find myself trying to focus primarily on powerlifting. I found a great looking workout program but info on assistance work is severely lacking.

Has anyone here tried this program?

Looking at the intense volume, could anyone suggest some assistance work for me? I feel too much assistance on this could tip me into the ‘overtraining zone’.
Ideas with rep and set ranges would be helpful.

Thanks!![/quote]

The program as written is designed for the drug user. Take that into consideration. I’d recommend stretching out the program by adding in some extra rest days. As far as assistance work…you are supposed to focus on the weak links (whatever they may be for you) for assistance work. Always work the lower back and hamstrings, though.

Probably need more info but if you want to train for strength (and some aesthetics) and are relatively new to weights (or even if you are not) I would take a look at Joe DeFranco’s training program called Westside For Skinny Bastards (Parts I and II). It doesn’t get much better than that.

http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=459321

http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=667308

Also search the forum for more info on this program and how to incorporate a secong lower body day.

Good luck.

"The program as written is designed for the drug user. Take that into consideration. I’d recommend stretching out the program by adding in some extra rest days. As far as assistance work…you are supposed to focus on the weak links (whatever they may be for you) for assistance work. Always work the lower back and hamstrings, though. "

This is made for the drug user? Why? I know plunty of people who have used it and made great gains with it, and they dont use drugs. I am not trying to call you out but I am curious why you think it is made for drug users.
Will42

Could we get a link to the program?

[quote]GDollars37 wrote:
Could we get a link to the program?[/quote]

… this page has a whole list of workouts in excel form. Look down the list and you’ll see the Dr. Squat 80 day cycle link for excel …

http://www.joeskopec.com/programs.html

google searches also bring up links to other sites with related articles about it.

It’s interesting that one poster feels this program is designed for a drug user, and another does not. This warrents some discussion, I think.

The main thing is, I’d still like specific answers to my questions about assistance work. To say ‘work your weak links’ doesn’t help me much. How MUCH should I work my weak links?

A close look at the program shows that on Bench/Squat day, it rotates from heavy squat/light bench to heavy bench/light squat on the next work out.

So on the heavier squat day, should I focus on Squat assistance? etc. etc. These are the kinds of answers I’m looking for. Thanks again all.

CONDITIONING TIPS FOR POWERLIFTERS
EXAMPLE OF A 12 WEEK PERIODIZED PEAKING CYCLE FOR POWERLIFTERS

Frederick C. Hatfield, Ph.D., MSS
The best way to train for competitive powerlifting is on a cycle training schedule. This type of training schedule combines workouts and exercises that will meet all your basic needs?limit strength and speed-strength.

The 80 day cycle described below allows five days recovery between all squat & bench workouts, and either four or six days between deadlift workouts?four following light squat workouts, or six following heavy squat workouts.

It?s best to schedule two short workouts per training day as opposed to one long one. Assistance work is allowable ONLY on scheduled workout days after the 4th week of training. Recovery becomes a critical factor by then. Following the 8th week, very relaxed and laid back off-days are vitally important.

						THERAPIES, STRATEGIES

DAY % MAX X REPS/SETS & ASSISTANCE EXERCISES


1 B 85% X 3/5 S 80% X 2/5 Virtually ALL of your
B 120% Overload x 3 assistance exercises for
the first 4 weeks of this
3 D 85% X 3/5 mesocycle MUST be geared
toward eliminating your
6 S 85% X 3/5 B 80% X 2/5 perceived weaknesses.
S 120% Overload x 3
Reduce percent bodyfat.
9 D 80% X 5/5 General foundation of
limit strength in all
11 B 85 X 4/5 S 80% X 2/5 synergistic and
B 120% Overload x 3 stabilizer muscles.
Modify your lifestyle
13 D 85% X 4/5 to include therapies
as directed, improved
16 S 85% X 4/5 B 80% X 2/5 dietary manipulation
S 120% Overload x 3 and sleep habits.
Technique errors must
19 D 80% X 5/5 be corrected.

21 B 85% X 5/5 S 80% X 2/5 Your supplements should
be chosen on the basis
B 120% Overload x 3 of immediate needs only
(e.g., fat loss, mental
23 D 85% X 5/5 focus, limit strength).

26 S 85% X 5/5 B 80% X 2/5 Acquire PASSION, for it
S 120% Overload x 3 will amplify MOTIVATION


29 D 80% X 5/5 From here on, virtually
ALL of your efforts MUST
31 B 85 X 6/5 S 80% X 2/5 be directed toward
B 120% Overload x 3 amplifying your STRENGTHS.
(too late to worry about
33 D 85% X 6/5 your weaknesses anymore)

36 S 85% X 6/5 B 80% X 2/5 Limit strength in all
S 120% Overload x 3 prime movers of lifts.
Continue following the
39 D 80% X 5/5 five rules of good
nutrition (important!)
41 B 90% X 2/3 S 80% X 2/5 Assistance exercises
B 120% Overload x 3 are now all done with
explosive concentric
43 D 90% X 2/3 movement, with the
eccentric movement
46 S 90% X 2/3 B 80% X 2/5 reduced or eliminated.
S 120% Overload x 3 Three lifts are all
performed with all-
49 D 80% X 5/5 out compensatory
acceleration (espec-
51 B 90% X 2/3 S 80% X 2/5 ially in 80% workouts).
B 120% Overload x 3 Supplements directed at
tissue repair, recovery
53 D 90% X 3/3 between workouts, and
recovery between sets.
56 S 90% X 3/3 B 80% X 2/5
S 120% Overload x 3

59 D 80% X 5/5


Eliminate all assistance exercises after this date. In other words,
ONLY the three lifts are performed from here on.


61 B 95% X 2/3 S 80% X 2/5 All three lifts are
B 120% Overload x 3 done at each session
D 95% X 2/3 (contest readiness).

66 S 95% X 2/3 B 80% X 2/5 Emphasis on perfect
S 120% Overload x 3 form and maximum
D 80% X 5/5 acceleration?do
NOT do singles or
71 B 100% X 2/3 S 80% X 2/5 attempt lifts you?re
B 120% Overload x 3 not absolutely sure
D 100 X 2/3 you?ll do for 2 reps
(Last Deadlift Workout) (save your mental
energy for the meet)…
76 (Should be Saturday)
S 100 X 2/3 B 80% X 2/5
S 120% Overload x 3


CONTEST WEEK: CONTEST DAY (SATURDAY):

80 Wednesday: 1st Attempts 2nd Attempts 3rd Attempts

overloads in S 100% S 105% 105% + 5 lb
S & B (120%) B 100% B 105% 105% + 5 lb
D 100% D 105% 105% + 5 lb

Notes: Each 5 day period should see approximately a 5 pound increase in your 80% level. It may just as easily be 2 pounds or 8 pounds. The precise increase in poundage will vary from athlete to athlete and from muscle group to muscle group. Also, since there is a 5 pound increase assumed for your 80% level, there will be a commensurate increase in your ongoing 85, 90, 95, 100 and 120 percent levels respectively (see %Max Chart below). This basic scheme of periodizing your training intensity relative to anticipated increases in strength is applicable to any other exercise or muscle group. You must begin by calculating training poundages based on percentages of your current maximum in each of the three lifts.

EXAMPLE:

Lifts at your last competition: 700 squat; 385 bench press; 585 deadlift.

	MAX		MAX 		MAX

WEEK SQUAT BENCH DEADLIFT

1 680 360 560
2 685 363 565
3 690 366 570
4 695 369 575
5 700 372 580
6 705 375 585
7 710 378 590
8 715 391 595
9 720 394 600
10 725 397 605
11 730 400 610
12 735 403 615

Each week, use the tabled amounts in computing training poundages at 80, 85, 90, 95, 100 and 120 percent. Adjust them if necessary, but not haphazardly. You may extend this training scheme to 24 weeks if you like.

Hmmm…the program didn’t come out quite right. Commentary was mixed in…

Basically, the author of this program is Dr. Fred Hatfield…who was a World Record Powerlifter. He’s worth reading up on if you have the time. He has some books out that you may still be able to find at Barnes & Noble, Books a Millions, etc.

Drug Use info is my opinion, and other notable “experts” who have used it, and used it to train other athletes.
A lot of Dr. Squats’ training is heavily USSR influenced. Its my understanding that Soviet programs call for any supplements necessary… to be able to handle the intensity and volume they call for. This 80 day program falls in line with that. The amount of rest just needs to be adjusted for the individual wether they are on drugs/supplements or not.

Only the 1st 4 weeks of program call for weaknesses to be focused on. I didn’t post that before. 2nd 4 weeks focus on strengths. There was a recent T-Nation article on sticking points and how to figure out what the weakness was causing that sticking point. Thats how I look at it.

I’ll quote Dr Squat on strengths…

"You have two different athletes, with two very, very different sets of attributes.
"Carl Lewis: not very good at starting strength; not very good at acceleration, but tremendous anaerobic strength endurance.

"Ben Johnson: no anaerobic strength endurance at all. He was slowing down very very fast. But he had tremendous starting strength; tremendous explosion out of those blocks and he reached top speed very very quickly.

"Now, if I were Ben Johnson’s coach, and I went to him – let’s say I was the coach for both of these gentlemen – and I went to Ben and I said “Ben, your starting strength is great; your explosiveness is great; your acceleration is great but you have a problem with anaerobic strength endurance. Let’s work that.”

"And similarly, I would say to Carl Lewis “Carl Lewis, your anaerobic strength endurance is great, you’re holding your speed very very well but you have a problem with your explosive strength and your starting strength. Let’s work that.”

“What would happen to both of these guys? I’d ruin their careers is what! Everybody is always talking about ‘work your weaknesses’ ‘work your weaknesses’. No, at that level of sport, you go with your strengths. You accentuate and magnify your strengths.”

But since your a beginner…I’d just do some general compound exercises that focus on everything.
Squat Day I’d add in some Glute Ham Raises or Leg Curls about 4 sets of 6-10; 3 sets of Calf Raises, and Back Extensions.
Deadlift Day I’d add in a few sets of Lunges or Split Squats 6-10 reps, and some Calf Raises.
Bench Day I’d add in some Wide Grip Pull Ups, Dips, and Bent Over Rows.

Another option is to mix in some of Fred Hatfields ABC training…also found in his books, etc…