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Double Progression vs Microloading

What do you think is the most effective?

I am on a diet of low volume training, big lifts, training in a “beat the logbook” fashion.

I’d sooner switch out lifts than engage in microloading.

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Yeah.

Double progression can work and allow you to make progress for awhile. You do more and more lifts within your capacity, to build yourself up.

With Microloading you skip right to end, with nearly un-doable workouts within a week or two and miss all the progress.

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Do you not think double progression would be better when training using RPE/ volume training? If he is doing low volume high intensity it will not work.

Every set i do Is ti failure anyway. Once i hit the top of my range (e.g. 6-10 reps, when i am able ti do at least 10 reps, i increase the weight on May next workout)

Depends a bit on the goal, but for all practical purposes, double progression will be the most useful overall.

Most people don’t have the patience to squat 225 one week, 227 the next week, 229 the week after, etc. for any extended period of time.

Or, like Jack Reape wrote: More Tips from the Weightroom Floor - T NATION
"In my humble opinion, those 1.25s are for World Records, not for gym use. In fact, for most serious lifters, 20 pound jumps are much better and the minimal acceptable standard.

To discourage whining and substandard, embarrassing decisions by anybody and everybody including myself, I have painted the 2.5s and 5-pound weights in my gym neon pink. Yep, if that 5 to 10 pound increment or PR is all you can handle, then slap that pink plate on and go for it I looks great in pictures too! Maybe when you’re done you can grab a wine spritzer and catch the Lilith Fair concert.

While some of this is bravado and a bit of self-induced pressure to step up, only seeking the minimal PR or smallest increment you can add to the bar is very self-defeating. You need to think bigger to get bigger or lift bigger. Bigger jumps between sets, bigger jumps between workouts, and always rounding up to the next higher 5 pound increment is much more productive in your workouts."

Dan John has also basically said similar and has often advocated only using 25 and 45-pound plates, so you’re adding reps until you know you’re ready for the next 50+ pounds.

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I like this. Thank you

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