T Nation

Dorian Yates Bodybuilding Wisdom


on bb.com

A LOT of very very good info for beginners and advanced also watch all of the videos there is some really great bodybuilding wisdom there the best bodybuilding related stuff I’ve seen in a very long time.

6 vid’s in total If I ever have a son and he wants to start bodybuilding I would just make him watch these vid’s and nothing else they are that good they are for people interested in pure bodybuilding not powerlifters,athletic training,crossfit

Very good tips on form,some interesting stuff about prehab…and how to do the bodybuilder deadlift…again some of the best bb info I have ever seen

ok sorry for posting the link I did not know it was not allowed you can find it on bb.com at ‘‘Dorian Yates’ Blood & Guts Trainer’’ just use google-fu it’s 6 episodes or something of dorian training his guys

Doesn’t this prove that low volume high intensity works? I’m sure, many will say, No, it doesn’t prove anything. Well, this is how Dorian trained for years and got to be one of the biggest bodybuilders ever. He now trains all his guys this same way.

Yes, high volume is superior. NOT.

RV just update your picture already

[quote]Achilles of war wrote:
RV just update your picture already[/quote]

What does my pic have to do with my post?

[quote]roguevampire wrote:
Doesn’t this prove that low volume high intensity works? I’m sure, many will say, No, it doesn’t prove anything. Well, this is how Dorian trained for years and got to be one of the biggest bodybuilders ever. He now trains all his guys this same way.

Yes, high volume is superior. NOT. [/quote]

-Both methods work
-Dorian chose what gave him results (low volume), Cutler chose what gave him results (high volume)
-No one values RV’s opinion because he acts like you’re an authority, yet no one has ever beheld any proof to validate this notion

With that said,… Dorian’s a damn bright guy. Like his physique, hate it, agree he shoulda won 6 or not, you can’t argue that he’s always been very analytical about his approach, and that certainly earns my respect (oh yeah, the Olympia wins count for something in my book too -lol).

S

Sadly, I think these are all on Youtube.

yepp, I also like to read / listen to what Yates say.

About those videos, take a look at this threads.


http://tnation.T-Nation.com/free_online_forum/blog_sports_training_performance_bodybuilding_alpha/my_thoughts_on_how_to_handle_yatesstyle_training_no_this_is_not_the_promised_powerbuilding_article_sorry

Works for me.

[quote]roguevampire wrote:
Doesn’t this prove that low volume high intensity works? I’m sure, many will say, No, it doesn’t prove anything. Well, this is how Dorian trained for years and got to be one of the biggest bodybuilders ever. He now trains all his guys this same way.

Yes, high volume is superior. NOT. [/quote]

Dorian didn’t use low volume for his entire lifting career. From 1983 to 1992 he trained with less volume than many of his peers, but it wasn’t so low to be considered very low volume. Six to nine sets per bodypart isn’t very low.

He employed his one-set-to-failure approach from '92 to '97. And this is a bit vague also because for some exercises he ramped up a bit with moderately heavy sets.

I agree with Stu in that Dorian is highly intelligent, methodical, and analytical. The one thing that doesn’t sit so well with me is that it seems he doesn’t tailor any of his training of others and puts them through the same workouts he used. Throughout all his columns in various mags, when questioned on how to design workouts for lagging bodyparts or a certain structure, he always gave the same information, regardless of what he was asked. If someone asked how to prioritize hamstrings, he gave his workout: lying leg curls, stiff-legged deadlifts, and standing leg curls. Shoulders? Overhead press, lateral raises, and cable or machine lateral raises. And so on and so on. Granted his advice wasn’t and isn’t bad, but it shows some narrow mindedness or lack of knowing how to apply training information to others situations. Like if someone is barrel chested with short arms, yeah, sure pound away at flat benches. But if he’s got a narrow torso and overpowering triceps and shoulders, you might have him do some pre-exaust with dumbbells or cables followed by dumbbell or incline barbell benches. Same goes for similar situations.

I’m also not a fan of constant employment of forced reps and training beyond failure and a total lack of acknowledging how higher volume can be used and its benefits.

Anyway, as some know, I’m a huge Dorian fan.

And like Stu said, people have used all sorts of methods to get to achieve their goals.

[quote]BrickHead wrote:

[quote]roguevampire wrote:
Doesn’t this prove that low volume high intensity works? I’m sure, many will say, No, it doesn’t prove anything. Well, this is how Dorian trained for years and got to be one of the biggest bodybuilders ever. He now trains all his guys this same way.

Yes, high volume is superior. NOT. [/quote]

Dorian didn’t use low volume for his entire lifting career. From 1983 to 1992 he trained with less volume than many of his peers, but it wasn’t so low to be considered very low volume. Six to nine sets per bodypart isn’t very low.

He employed his one-set-to-failure approach from '92 to '97. And this is a bit vague also because for some exercises he ramped up a bit with moderately heavy sets.

I agree with Stu in that Dorian is highly intelligent, methodical, and analytical. The one thing that doesn’t sit so well with me is that it seems he doesn’t tailor any of his training of others and puts them through the same workouts he used. Throughout all his columns in various mags, when questioned on how to design workouts for lagging bodyparts or a certain structure, he always gave the same information, regardless of what he was asked. If someone asked how to prioritize hamstrings, he gave his workout: lying leg curls, stiff-legged deadlifts, and standing leg curls. Shoulders? Overhead press, lateral raises, and cable or machine lateral raises. And so on and so on. Granted his advice wasn’t and isn’t bad, but it shows some narrow mindedness or lack of knowing how to apply training information to others situations. Like if someone is barrel chested with short arms, yeah, sure pound away at flat benches. But if he’s got a narrow torso and overpowering triceps and shoulders, you might have him do some pre-exaust with dumbbells or cables followed by dumbbell or incline barbell benches. Same goes for similar situations.

I’m also not a fan of constant employment of forced reps and training beyond failure and a total lack of acknowledging how higher volume can be used and its benefits.

Anyway, as some know, I’m a huge Dorian fan. [/quote]

Mentzer was the same way, and well, it’s probably not surprising that Yates picked up that attitude.

That could be. Or he might just be someone who doesn’t know how to apply a variety of things to different situations. People seem to think that because someone’s done great it automatically means they know how to help out everyone else.

[quote]BrickHead wrote:
That could be. Or he might just be someone who doesn’t know how to apply a variety of things to different situations. People seem to think that because someone’s done great it automatically means they know how to help out everyone else. [/quote]

i think its actually commonly stated on this site that the best athletes are not the best coaches. IE, dave tate, been through hell with injuries and puts up decent numbers. Knows a shit load more in helping me overcome shit than someone who has never had an injury or had to train around something etc…

[quote]bignate wrote:

[quote]BrickHead wrote:
That could be. Or he might just be someone who doesn’t know how to apply a variety of things to different situations. People seem to think that because someone’s done great it automatically means they know how to help out everyone else. [/quote]

i think its actually commonly stated on this site that the best athletes are not the best coaches. IE, dave tate, been through hell with injuries and puts up decent numbers. Knows a shit load more in helping me overcome shit than someone who has never had an injury or had to train around something etc… [/quote]

Definitely.

Dorian also is the same way with diet information.

Anyway, I think he’s one of the best IFBB pro ever. Should’ve came in second to Nasser (second favorite IFBB pro of mine) in his last Olympia though, in my opinion.

Dorians back was insane. (this adds nothing to the thread i know)

[quote]ryanbCXG wrote:
Dorians back was insane. (this adds nothing to the thread i know)[/quote]

haha i opened this wondering what someone else had to say… and it was this :slight_smile:

[quote]BrickHead wrote:

The one thing that doesn’t sit so well with me is that it seems he doesn’t tailor any of his training of others and puts them through the same workouts he used. Throughout all his columns in various mags, when questioned on how to design workouts for lagging bodyparts or a certain structure, he always gave the same information, regardless of what he was asked.

[/quote]

me too think the same way about Yates,His monothematic approach is very fascinating,very pure and worked very well for Him.
btw,Yates has always been my favorite Pro,before I was a big fan of Menzter either,heavy influenced by MM

[quote]BrickHead wrote:
That could be. Or he might just be someone who doesn’t know how to apply a variety of things to different situations. People seem to think that because someone’s done great it automatically means they know how to help out everyone else. [/quote]

Good point.

I think there’s another thread or article about this.

We generally take any advice, unquestioned, by big genetically gifted guys who would grow no matter what they did.

Conversely, we ignore more logical advice if it comes from a small guy.

Hmm. There’s a lessen here.

:wink:

[quote]Iron Dwarf wrote:

We generally take any advice, unquestioned, by big genetically gifted guys who would grow no matter what they did.

Conversely, we ignore more logical advice if it comes from a small guy.

;)[/quote]

“ubi maior minor cessat” or the BIG guy is right…because he is big LOL

[quote]buzza wrote:

[quote]BrickHead wrote:

The one thing that doesn’t sit so well with me is that it seems he doesn’t tailor any of his training of others and puts them through the same workouts he used. Throughout all his columns in various mags, when questioned on how to design workouts for lagging bodyparts or a certain structure, he always gave the same information, regardless of what he was asked.

[/quote]

me too think the same way about Yates,His monothematic approach is very fascinating,very pure and worked very well for Him.
btw,Yates has always been my favorite Pro,before I was a big fan of Menzter either,heavy influenced by MM[/quote]

In defence of Yates regarding how to design workouts for lagging bodyparts, he has on many occasions emphasized that to effectively tackle lagging bodyparts, one must hit that bodypart at the beginning of a workout, for example if its leg day and your calves are lagging behind your quads and glutes, train calves first, that way you can put fort maximum energy and focus into getting a more effective calve workout against training them last.

Other bodyparts that are stronger and respond better may not need to be trained with the same amount of intesity, perhaps a rep or two short of failure could suffice. (I havent directly trained biceps in 21 months) In terms of tailoring, obviously one must begin to think for themselves and what works for them instead of blindly following excersise routine from Dorian or anyone else, but when training others I think Dorians point was the priciples and reasoning in terms of the high intensity methods and protocols used as opposed to just the excersise selection.