T Nation

Donate Blood While On?

I am on 100mg of enanthate a week and would like to donate blood as my hematocrit is 50 or a tad above. I checked the web site for United Blood Services and it mentioned female HRT was ok but no mention of of male HRT. Is it acceptable to donate blood while on?

KEEP YOUR PRECIOUS BODILY FLUIDS.

Can I have it?

what a pint, but thats nearly an armfull

Sure. Donate all you want. In fact i’d say it’s a bargain for them. They’ll get up to 40% more red blood cells out of you. Not to mention they’ll all propably have really healthy hemoglobin also.

To my knowledge the only thing they really worry about aside from diseases is the donor being anemic. But you’re far from that. So go ahead and help another human out.

Peace.

While I am not on HRT, I did donate blood just yesterday, so this is some interesting timing. The myriad of questions they hit you with before donating have a lot of focus on anything relating to injections (concerns of blood-borne diseases, infections, etc.) but given the fact you are under a doctor’s supervision, I doubt it would be too much of an issue.

Hey show up and give it a whirl. If you get knocked out, you gave it a try and if they are OK with it, you just helped out a few different people. As someone with two people very close to me who have fought through leukemia, I cannot emphasize enough how important it is for people to donate if they can.

You can donate and then check the box afterwards to have them dump it - no questions asked.

Some little girl could get your blood and grow a beard.

You don’t want that.

CD

I was told by the Red Cross doc that you shouldn’t donate if you’ve got hemochromatosis. I think that what it’s called, anyway. Its condition where you’ve got too many RBCs.

That kind of donation could hurt some recipients, particularly those with kidney, liver, or heart conditions. I don’t know if this applies to what you’re on, but a previous poster mentions extra RBCs. They’ll likely screen you out if you do have hemo-whatever, for whatever reason. All you can do is go in and see.

Thanks for the responses. My hematocrit was at 45 before going on hrt and has gone up the longer I have been on. My last labs on 6/12 showed me at 49.5 which is at the ver high end of normal. I know that hematocrit can be elevated by dehydration and who in Las Vegas during the summer isn’t going to be a bit dehydrated but I made sure I was drinking a fair amount of water the days before my labs were drawn.

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

[quote]bushidobadboy wrote:
I went to donate once, but there was a box to tick if you had ever used any ‘bodybuilding type drugs’. So I left. I’m not sure that donating your blood if you have a high haematocrit is wise, after all, someone might get sick from it, not to mention the elevated test levels. Some old granny might start roid-raging at the supermarket and nobody wants that ;)[/quote]

Actually Whole blood is very rarely transfused.

When the blood is recieved by the donor, it is taken to the blood bank where it is spun. The different parts of the blood is separated into Packed red cells, Albumin, and Platelets.

I’m sure there are others but these are the ones I deal with.

We then transfuse patients with packed red cells if they are aneimic.

Albumin if they have liver failure and third spacing issues.

Platelets if they are low in clotting factors.

Tramas usually get a ton a fluid, then Packed red cells, and finally platelets to hold the blood in the body :).

The presence of AAS in the blood would be inconsequential for the most part, as most would be bound anyway.

Giving blood while on AAS can be an effective means of preventing Stroke, Blood clots, or heart attack. It can also lower your blood pressure and reduce the risk of Blood Iron toxicity.

[quote]Prisoner#22 wrote:

Actually Whole blood is very rarely transfused.

When the blood is recieved by the donor, it is taken to the blood bank where it is spun. The different parts of the blood is separated into Packed red cells, Albumin, and Platelets.

I’m sure there are others but these are the ones I deal with.

We then transfuse patients with packed red cells if they are aneimic.

Albumin if they have liver failure and third spacing issues.

Platelets if they are low in clotting factors.

Tramas usually get a ton a fluid, then Packed red cells, and finally platelets to hold the blood in the body :).

The presence of AAS in the blood would be inconsequential for the most part, as most would be bound anyway.

Giving blood while on AAS can be an effective means of preventing Stroke, Blood clots, or heart attack. It can also lower your blood pressure and reduce the risk of Blood Iron toxicity.[/quote]

Awesome post. Thanks it is what I was needing to hear.

[quote]bushidobadboy wrote:
I went to donate once, but there was a box to tick if you had ever used any ‘bodybuilding type drugs’. So I left. I’m not sure that donating your blood if you have a high haematocrit is wise, after all, someone might get sick from it, not to mention the elevated test levels. Some old granny might start roid-raging at the supermarket and nobody wants that ;)[/quote]

If giving doped up blood can speed up the thought process of these geezers while they’re in line at the grocerie store buying their fuckin’ lotto tickets and all, I’m all for it!

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

This post was flagged by the community and is temporarily hidden.

Donated a double red cells on Monday and everything went great. Before the donation I was getting tingling sensations in my feet and once or twice I got sharp shooting pains in my left foot but no problems since donating. Menatocrit at the time was 50. Could be a totally unrelated coincidence.

I ommited my exogenous t use when doing the questionare. We will see if anything shows on the sample they took for testing.

[quote]Crispyknight wrote:
I was told by the Red Cross doc that you shouldn’t donate if you’ve got hemochromatosis. I think that what it’s called, anyway. Its condition where you’ve got too many RBCs.

That kind of donation could hurt some recipients, particularly those with kidney, liver, or heart conditions. I don’t know if this applies to what you’re on, but a previous poster mentions extra RBCs. They’ll likely screen you out if you do have hemo-whatever, for whatever reason. All you can do is go in and see.[/quote]

hemochromatosis is not caused by too many RBC’s really. it’s a disorder with iron absorption hence the origin of the name chromatosis. you overload iron, so you start to actually get a bronze discoloration(chroma).

[quote]consumer wrote:
Crispyknight wrote:
I was told by the Red Cross doc that you shouldn’t donate if you’ve got hemochromatosis. I think that what it’s called, anyway. Its condition where you’ve got too many RBCs.

That kind of donation could hurt some recipients, particularly those with kidney, liver, or heart conditions. I don’t know if this applies to what you’re on, but a previous poster mentions extra RBCs. They’ll likely screen you out if you do have hemo-whatever, for whatever reason. All you can do is go in and see.

hemochromatosis is not caused by too many RBC’s really. it’s a disorder with iron absorption hence the origin of the name chromatosis. you overload iron, so you start to actually get a bronze discoloration(chroma).

[/quote]

I believe the condition he is refering to is more acurately described by it’s medical name: polycytemia.

[quote]Prisoner#22 wrote:
consumer wrote:
Crispyknight wrote:
I was told by the Red Cross doc that you shouldn’t donate if you’ve got hemochromatosis. I think that what it’s called, anyway. Its condition where you’ve got too many RBCs.

That kind of donation could hurt some recipients, particularly those with kidney, liver, or heart conditions. I don’t know if this applies to what you’re on, but a previous poster mentions extra RBCs. They’ll likely screen you out if you do have hemo-whatever, for whatever reason. All you can do is go in and see.

hemochromatosis is not caused by too many RBC’s really. it’s a disorder with iron absorption hence the origin of the name chromatosis. you overload iron, so you start to actually get a bronze discoloration(chroma).

I believe the condition he is refering to is more acurately described by it’s medical name: polycytemia.[/quote]

Thanks to both of you for clearing that up. Hemochromatosis didn’t sound quite right. I’m a chemist, not a doctor. :stuck_out_tongue:

[quote]Crispyknight wrote:
Prisoner#22 wrote:
consumer wrote:
Crispyknight wrote:
I was told by the Red Cross doc that you shouldn’t donate if you’ve got hemochromatosis. I think that what it’s called, anyway. Its condition where you’ve got too many RBCs.

That kind of donation could hurt some recipients, particularly those with kidney, liver, or heart conditions. I don’t know if this applies to what you’re on, but a previous poster mentions extra RBCs. They’ll likely screen you out if you do have hemo-whatever, for whatever reason. All you can do is go in and see.

hemochromatosis is not caused by too many RBC’s really. it’s a disorder with iron absorption hence the origin of the name chromatosis. you overload iron, so you start to actually get a bronze discoloration(chroma).

I believe the condition he is refering to is more acurately described by it’s medical name: polycytemia.

Thanks to both of you for clearing that up. Hemochromatosis didn’t sound quite right. I’m a chemist, not a doctor. :stuck_out_tongue:
[/quote]

hell yea for chemists, synthetic chemist? Hook up the chemical analogs.

i’ll take some nitric acid and toluene please.