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Does Starting Strength Work?


What are all of your thoughts on Mark Rippetoe's Starting Strength routine for building a lot of strength?

Workout A:
Back squat 3x5
Bench press 3x5
Deadlift 1x5

Workout B:
Back squat 3x5
Press 3x5
Power Clean 5x3

Does this routine work? Does it build muscle as well or just strength?


It is pretty good this is what I used when I first started and got really strong. After a while I increased the reps but I think that if you have not done any resistance training before perhaps you shouldn't be using so much weight in case of injuries.




See this thread:


it works


Asking if a training program "works" is like asking if a car drives. It's an overly-vague question (though I get what you mean). The plan does work, and so do many others.

If you're eating enough, you should be consistently gaining muscular size and strength throughout the program. If size is your goal and aren't seeing significant bodyweight gains even though strength is improving each workout, you're not eating properly.


Every beginners should started with a strength program, and hey man Rippetoe knows what he's talking


no, actually.

Each person is an individual. Blanket statements like this are dangerous.


I see a lot of young guys scrapping their work by doing unlimited set of curls or doing too much bench work without good form. I just need to go in my gym to see that.

I see a lot of young man succesfully doing powerlifting because they learn how to lift properly, and learn how to do it in a continuous curve. Just need to go in the high school gymnasium for after hour powerlifting.

For me learning how to lift big before doing some unlimited sets of bodybuilding program it's just sense.

Give your body a good foundation before trying fancy moves, for me it's more secure and less likely to be injured in the future.


For the first 8-10 weeks you'll see a strength gain before body mass as your central nervous system learns to fire more effectivly or in sequence. However, it really depends on your genetics and caloric intake.