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Does Splenda Create an Insulin Spike?

Does anyone have a clue if splenda causes an insulin spike?

It’s main ingredients are dextrose, maldexotrin, and sucralose.

In my experience, and based on what I’ve read, the answer is no.

[quote]espndude21 wrote:
It’s main ingredients are dextrose, maldexotrin, and sucralose.[/quote]

If that’s really the case, then the answer would be “yes”.

Read Cy wilsons article about sucralose.

I believe the answer is no, but the article has a ton of other information about splenda as well, and the studies that were used

If it has actual sugar mixed in, like above, then I imagine it would.

Fuck then what do we do

1 packet of splenda has .9g of carbs (maltodextrin and dextrose) = 3.6 calories. I would imagine this would spike insulin?

Only if you had about 12 packets, a small tomato has more than .9g of carbs in it! If you were on a strick cut, avoid it, if you’re bulking then .9g of carbs particularly around training isn’t going to hamper your goals!

Hey guys lets not forget that it takes like 50g of HI GI carbs to cause a significant insulin response right? True the ingredients of splenda are HI GI carbs, but look how much a serving is, 1tbs (.5g). So theoretically to cause a insulin spike would take alot of splenda. Im no expert tho.

I wondered about this myself? I use it all the time…but I would imagine its not that significant

Seems like that guys worrying about this are the last people who should be.

i checked my package of granulated splenda and it says it contains maltodextrin and sucralose.

for a 0.5g serving there are 0 calories; i would guess for the average amount a person uses there are a few calories. however, this would still be a small enough amount that changes in insulin levels should be negligible.

also, it is written on the package: “suitable for people with diabetes.” as i understand it, this is a health claim and therefore the fda would have had to approve this. if splenda caused any sort of “insulin spike” this would not be written on the package.

[quote]ktennies wrote:

also, it is written on the package: “suitable for people with diabetes.” as i understand it, this is a health claim and therefore the fda would have had to approve this. if splenda caused any sort of “insulin spike” this would not be written on the package.[/quote]

you have way too much faith in the competency of government organizations

Unless you are taking a ton of splenda in one sitting, there is not need to worry unless you are on a ketogenic diet or something like that.

[quote]rsg wrote:
Seems like that guys worrying about this are the last people who should be.[/quote]

Occupation: Student
Weight: 119
Height: 5 '6
Body fat %: 3-5%
Years Training: 1

No way. He’s only 3% bf. He NEEDS to take the insulin spike from 1 packet of Splenda into consideration if he wants to maintain that strict level of leanness!

Taken from PubMed:

"Acesulfame K is an artificial sweetener which has been used in the food industry for some years. As yet no metabolic effects have been reported. It was reported that the sweetener can induce a cephalic phase of insulin secretion. To analyse the mechanism of this phenomenon, we studied the effect of Acesulfame K on insulin secretion in vivo. Male Wistar rats, weighing 250-300 g were fasted overnight and anaesthetized with phenobarbital.

A silicon catheter was inserted into the right cervical vein for injection of test substances and for obtaining blood samples. In some experiments, another catheter was inserted into the left cervical vein for continuous infusion.

Blood samples were drawn at 0, 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 min after injection, and at -10, 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 60, 80, 100 and 120 min after the infusion started. Injection of Acesulfame K (150 mg/kg body weight) increased the plasma insulin concentration at 5 min from 27.3 +/- 3.0 microU/ml to 58.6 +/- 4.2 microU/ml without any significant change in the blood glucose.

Infusion of Acesulfame K (20 mg/kg body weight/min) for one hour maintained the insulin concentration at a high level (about 85-100 microU/ml) during this period, and at the same time blood glucose was gradually reduced from 103.0 +/- 7.3 to 72.0 +/- 7.2 mg/dl. When using different amounts of Acesulfame K, the insulin secretion was stimulated in a dose-dependent fashion.

The effect of Acesulfame K on insulin secretion was similar to that observed by injecting or infusing the same doses of glucose (150 mg/kg) body weight for injection and 20 mg/kg body weight/min for infusion), except that no hyperglycemia was observed with Acesulfame K.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)"

I would say yes… I have personally observed people becoming addicted to diet pop probably because it causes insulin secretion, lowers blood glucose, therefore causing sweet cravings and a yearning for another diet pop…

Splenda is Sucralose not Acesulfame Potassium