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Does Heart Rate Relate to Metabolism?

I was at Safeway the other day and I got bored and tried the machine that takes your blood pressure. I couldn’t help but notice that I have a fairly low resting heart rate. This got me wondering; what is the relation between a slow (or fast) heart rate and your metabolism? I’m by no means overweight because I’m 18, but I was curious as to what problems could this possibly lead to down the road.

There’s no relation as far as I know for heart rate and metabolism, but a low heart does mean that your heart can pump more blood per beat, which is generally a good thing.

The best method I know of to measure you metabolism at home is with your temperature. The higher it is the faster your metabolism.

[quote]Payaso wrote:
I was at Safeway the other day and I got bored and tried the machine that takes your blood pressure. I couldn’t help but notice that I have a fairly low resting heart rate.

This got me wondering; what is the relation between a slow (or fast) heart rate and your metabolism? I’m by no means overweight because I’m 18, but I was curious as to what problems could this possibly lead to down the road.[/quote]

I used to wonder about this too. My theory is the slower the heart beat the slower the metabolism. The reason I say this is because when the Minnesota study was conducted, the men (who were starved,) had lower resting heart rates and lower metabolisms; needless to say, you are probably not starving yourself but I do find that there is a relation between the two

[quote]Payaso wrote:
I was at Safeway the other day and I got bored and tried the machine that takes your blood pressure. I couldn’t help but notice that I have a fairly low resting heart rate.

This got me wondering; what is the relation between a slow (or fast) heart rate and your metabolism? I’m by no means overweight because I’m 18, but I was curious as to what problems could this possibly lead to down the road.[/quote]

There is no relationship between HR and metabolism.

Now if you factor stroke volume into the mix there might be something, but looking at HR alone is fairly meaningless.

Most athletes strive lower resting HR anyway.

Most well conditioned athletes (specifically endurance athletes) have resting rates of 60 BPM or less. I wouldn’t let this be of any concern to you. If anything, be grateful for it.

Your metabolism has no direct effect on heart rate, although there are many other indirect factors that come into play. Your blood pressure is less easily stimulated if your body is used to intense training, therefore you might maintain a more commonly relaxed heart rate. There are a variety of variables that can have a correlation to this.

Technically it could effect it slightly, since you need energy for your heart to beat.
Muscle mass is the primary determiner of metabolism.
Cyclist’s often have resting heart rates in the 30’s and 40’s.
The best way to determine resting heart rate is while you’re sleeping, or right after you wake up.

@OP: Having a low heart rate can only be good, unless you’re dead. In which case it would be 0.

What Bloobird said is correct.