T Nation

Doctor Won't Prescribe TRT


#1

Hi, my free test level is 211, and my Serum level is 10.2. My doctor said my free level means nothing, and that my serum level has to be 6 or lower otherwise government won’t let me have TRT? Sounds like bullshit and I could tell he didnt want to give me it from the very start. Then all he did was touch my balls and look at my penis and send me on my way, only after $200 bucks. Is any of this true? I have symptoms of low T and everyone should talking about free test levels being low and mines lower then anyone I’ve seen yet! Please help as I now feel stuck. I live in Melbourne, Australia. Thanks!


#2

Hi Aussie here as well, been battling for 2 years to get to bottom of my issues. TRT can only be prescribed through the PBS if its below 6, mine was at 6 for a while but leveled out about 8. You’ll need to pay full price like I did. I was able to get my Gp to prescribe testogel. But he doesn’t know what he’s doing neither did my endo or urologist. Absolute morons. I was stuck as well, but look up Dr Adrian Zentner. I’ll off to see him him in Syd in about 5 weeks. I live in country NSW. He definitely comes to Sydney and Brisbane so most like he does Melbourne too. Look him up on youtube he really knows where its at. Apparently he’ll prescribe injectables and Arimidex.


#3

The rules on TRT in Australia are that you can only get subsidised treatment if your total testosterone is below 6 nmol/L. Injections come in under the $38 cap, so it’s not a major problem.

There are a few people who will prescribe TRT. I’m seeing Dr Zentner, who does monthly clinics in Melbourne, and will next be over in mid April. There’s Dr Willcourt in South Yarra, and Recomp in the CBD too.


#4

Thanks a lot mate


#5

Thanks a lot mate. Are you saying I don’t need a prescription I can just pay full price?


#6

Sorry are you saying I don’t need a prescription and can pay full price somewhere? I’m confused


#7

Hi Jack, No you definitely need a prescription, its just it wont be discounted as you wont be going through the PBS. Only an Endo can prescribe T so you get it through the PBS, and you to be under 6.

I pay about $100 for 30 gels.


#8

As @flash74 said, you’ll need a prescription.

Testosterone is on the restricted medicines list in Victoria, and probably elsewhere in Australia, so the doctor has to hand write the details in, as well as print them, and can only issue you repeats to cover up to six months at a time.

You will pay full price for the items. Flash’s gels cost him $100, whilst the subsidised cost would be $38. I don’t know how much Nebido is.

Injectible testosterone is cheaper, something like $30, which falls under the PBS threshold, so if you’re a cheapskate who can cope with needles, there’d be no savings if prescribed by an endocrinologist.


#9

The stickies below will get you educated so you can see through the fog of ignorance in the medical community.

Please read the stickies found here: About the T Replacement Category

  • advice for new guys
  • things that damage your hormones
  • protocol for injections
  • finding a TRT doc

Evaluate your overall thyroid function by checking oral body temperatures as per the thyroid basics sticky. Thyroid hormone fT3 is what gets the job done and it regulates mitochondrial activity, the source of ATP which is the universal currency of cellular energy. This is part of the body’s temperature control loop. This can get messed up if you are iodine deficient. In many countries, you need to be using iodized salt. Other countries add iodine to dairy or bread.


#10

@KSman there’s an added problem in Australia that almost all doctors won’t prescribe TRT unless total testosterone is below 6 nmol/L, or 173 Ng/dL. That makes it near impossible to make progress, unless you find someone like Dr Zentner.

I think that this additional hurdle means that GPs are less inclined to study the subject. It’s not like the US, where slightly low levels are immediately flagged.


#11

That is a sad state of affairs as the mental, sexual and emotional damage is often severe. There are physical secondary issues of increased BP, arterial damage, insulin resistance and diabetes, prostate problems, depression, lost intimacy with sexual partner, skin aging, muscle wasting with falls and broken bones, personality changes, lost relationships, depression.