T Nation

Doctor Visit- Test Levels

I just got back from the doctor today. This was my first visit to him and I came away very impressed. He new everything their is to know about testosterone levels,LH, SFH, estradiol and so forth.

However he suggested that I quit the AndroGel right away because I have an appointment with an Endo in ten days. Reason being the AndroGel would alter my blood results, Estrogens levels and so forth. I had already started it once then quit and now back on it for a few days.

I’m pretty much dead in the water as it is. Would anyone else suggest the stoppage and wean myself off of it? Would taking clomid help restore my natural levels and or hurt the process.
Thanks for you help.

What is your goal? In theory, you want an accurate reading of your endogenous (natural) test level, and you wouldn’t want to take anything that would affect the result.

I say “in theory” because it’s not uncommon for men seeking TRT to lower their T intentionally before blood profiling. The lower the result, the greater the likelihood of getting a prescription.

To this end, some put a sudden halt to their supplementation, and the short-term effect is a hormonal free-fall. The normal processes have yet to re-engage, and in the interim, T levels can be at an artificially low point. Unwittingly, you may have put yourself in this situation when (and if) you stopped AndroGel.

(My own experience with AndroGel and that of many others here is that it achieved such unremarkable results, it probably will make no difference at all. But that’s my bias.)

My personal opinion is to get off everything, take an honest blood test, and proceed from there. It’s always the clinician’s hope to keep as much control as possible in a test. In this short-term context, I see Clomid as an unecessary variable.

[quote]Plowman wrote:
What is your goal? In theory, you want an accurate reading of your endogenous (natural) test level, and you wouldn’t want to take anything that would affect the result.

I say “in theory” because it’s not uncommon for men seeking TRT to lower their T intentionally before blood profiling. The lower the result, the greater the likelihood of getting a prescription.

To this end, some put a sudden halt to their supplementation, and the short-term effect is a hormonal free-fall. The normal processes have yet to re-engage, and in the interim, T levels can be at an artificially low point. Unwittingly, you may have put yourself in this situation when (and if) you stopped AndroGel.

(My own experience with AndroGel and that of many others here is that it achieved such unremarkable results, it probably will make no difference at all. But that’s my bias.)

My personal opinion is to get off everything, take an honest blood test, and proceed from there. It’s always the clinician’s hope to keep as much control as possible in a test. In this short-term context, I see Clomid as an unecessary variable. [/quote]

I agree 100%…great post.

[quote]Plowman wrote:
What is your goal? In theory, you want an accurate reading of your endogenous (natural) test level, and you wouldn’t want to take anything that would affect the result.

I say “in theory” because it’s not uncommon for men seeking TRT to lower their T intentionally before blood profiling. The lower the result, the greater the likelihood of getting a prescription.

To this end, some put a sudden halt to their supplementation, and the short-term effect is a hormonal free-fall. The normal processes have yet to re-engage, and in the interim, T levels can be at an artificially low point. Unwittingly, you may have put yourself in this situation when (and if) you stopped AndroGel.

(My own experience with AndroGel and that of many others here is that it achieved such unremarkable results, it probably will make no difference at all. But that’s my bias.)

My personal opinion is to get off everything, take an honest blood test, and proceed from there. It’s always the clinician’s hope to keep as much control as possible in a test. In this short-term context, I see Clomid as an unnecessary variable. [/quote]

This is a difficult situation. You want good numbers, but may end up with numbers that are only representative of one individual who stopped taking something a few weeks ago.

To the original OP, taking clomid before the BW is not representative of anything that you want to do or a condition to treat. When you get off of T, the T levels will be low, the more effected the old TRT had been and longer, the longer it would take to normalize. And as one can find on this site, some who have used gear and ignored PCT, then can be left with things severely messed up for a very long time, perhaps permanent. But guys on TRT should stay on TRT and we should have no concern with post TRT recovery… and post TRT levels cannot be expected to be of any level that one wants to live with.

Getting your TT and FT levels up is the first step. Then, you need to know what the E levels are and deal with that. That second step can be way more important than the first in terms of QOL benefits!!! The second step also depends on your having a doc who understands how to use AI and HCG. It is all about your symptoms, not your blood work.

So you need to be on TRT for a longer amount of time, 6-8 weeks, then get E levels checked and have all of your symptoms written down as talking points. If your doc will only deal with E levels out of normal range, you need to find another doctor. A doc can have a great understanding of the hormone mechanisms and still fail to treat the patient.

I suggest that you see the endo with your earlier BW as that is representative of your underlying problem. Always have and retain copies of all of your blood work… you need that as you may need to switch doctors at some point. Remember that this is a life long thing for 99+% of guys who need TRT.

Explain what you have been doing and that you feel that your current levels are probably not representative of anything. Be prepared to discuss how you applied Androgel and that it may not be useful for you. That may lead to a discussion of injected T, and then you may have to get injections in the doctor’s office with some docs. So sort out your feelings about injections and self injections before that appointment.

Don’t stop/start your TRT on your own. If you are jacking around with your TRT you can’t expect that a doctor will be able to address a problem with the therapy if you are messing that up. My self, I am very concerned about doing anything that will reduce the value of my next lab work. TRT often requires refinement, don’t make things impossible. And you may feel like crap until you get things worked out. Don’t do things that can make this process take any longer.

Keep reading.