T Nation

Difference In Oats


#1

Does anyone know of a difference between Quaker Instant whole raw oats ready in five minute versus the Quaker Instant oats ready in one? The nutrient profile is exactly the same but since I add them to protein powders in the blender, I'm wondering if there's a variation in bioavailability or the digestion time.

I do NOT microwave the oats by the way......

Peace be with all!


#2

"Quick" oats or "instant" oats have been steamed, before being rolled into flakes. This means that they're a bit pre-cooked and therefore would probably mix and digest better with cold shakes.

Myself - I prefer for breakfast cereal the regular rolled oats w/ boiling water, because there's more texture. The quick oats are definately soggier.


#3

So does that imply that the one minute Quaker Instant oats are more easily digested rather than the five when blended for a cold shake?

Peace be with you.


#4

That is pretty much what he said.


#5

Quick oats are also cut smaller so that they cook quicker. For a shake, quick oats will blend better if you are using an electric mixer.


#6

Wait, did I miss the memo? I thought that the reason old fashioned was recommended was because of a lower GI/II.


#7

i eat the old fashioned, but i dont mix in a shake

i do a weird thing but i love how it tastes

i buy those 10 packs of instant, put it in the microwave with skim milk for a minute

i then add .5 cup of the old fashined and mix it in

to me it tastes like oatmeal cookie dough(not as sweet but texture wise), it is great


#8

Aside from possibly whacking the great GI/II of them the instant have like said above been heated etc.. PROCESSED. These huge fast effecient PROCESSES are good at what they do but are alos good at destruction of various micronutrients that are naturally found in our food. Or were before all the processing.

Might think of that as well.


#9

Ok, after researching:
http://www.quakeroatmeal.com/Products/SQO/SQO-QuickOats.cfm

there appear to be three types of oats from Quaker; Old Fashioned, Quick, and Instant. I bought a few tubs of the 5-minute Old Fashioned Oats but they have the same nutritional profile as the 1-minute Quick. Is there any difference in bioavailability or digestion between the Old Fashioned and the Quick? My initial post was flawed in that I cited the sugar-laden, flavored Instant oats. My apologies folks.

Peace be with all.


#10

I had actually understood what you were asking, the difference between quick oats and regular rolled oats.

Because they are steamed before being rolled flat, quick oats would probably mix better, digest better and become more bioavailable in a cold shake than would regular oats.


#11

So their is no need to nuke them first?
I have been nuking 1.5 cups for 2 minutes then throwing in a blender with two scoops of Grow! and a banana for a quick Breakfast shake. I though you needed to cook them first? If not I just shaved 2 minutes of the morning rush. Nice!


#12

Oats will cook in your stomach, don't worry about it... eat the real deal.


#13

I actually think that the best way to eats oats are raw. I've always eaten them like that. When you cook them you take away some of their nutrients. Also is easier for the body to digest them raw than cooked...


#14

Yeah, I use the Old-fashioned Oats and put them in a food processor until they are almost powdered. Then they are great for thickening up a shake.

I guess the idea is that if you can avoid any kind of processing (even the slight processing done to the Quick Oats), you are better off. But, I doubt that the Quick Oats are drastically different.

I'm curious, is there a price difference?


#15

Amen.
I can't stand cooked oatmeal.

I have a cup+ of oats with a few dried cherries, soak them in a little skim milk for about 10 minutes.

Not sure about blending them up dry and making a powder.
You're basically making oat flour and nixing a lot of the fiber.
Suppose that might be good for post workout.


#16

BTW -

Oat bran is already smaller pieces, and higher protein. You shake guys might want to take that for a spin, unless there's another reason for using the whole grain.