T Nation

Difference in Aerobic & Anaerobic HIIT

Hi, I don’t know where to ask so I’ll do it here. I came across an article where they talked about attacking one’s energy systems one by one.

There are 5 ways of training:

  1. Metabolic Resistance Training
    -circuits 8-12 reps range

  2. High Intensity Anaerobic Interval Training
    Is this like Tabata protocol, circuit type lifting with short rests, e.g. complexes?? What is Metabolic Resistance TRaining than?

3.High Intensity Aerobic Interval Training
And this one is Interval Build up Running as per CT’s Running Man??

  1. Steady State High Intensity Aerobic Training
    -hard steady cardio

  2. Steady State Low Intensity Aerobic Training

  • going for a walk

[quote]JuicyLucy wrote:
Hi, I don’t know where to ask so I’ll do it here. I came across an article where they talked about attacking one’s energy systems one by one.
[/quote]

This question seems a bit confusing so here’s a shot in the dark. And perhaps it would be best -if you posted it to one of the coaches on-line. I would also recommend reading Alwyn Cosgroves previous articles -he covers much of what you have posted.

picture running in an aerobic pace/aerobic zone. Rather then an all out sprint. Inter spaced with lower intensity running. even walking.

Anaerobic is fast enough that your body goes into oxygen debt. This debt needs to be recovered later, whilst aerobic can have its oxygen needs met immediately.

So, you can measure this with pace, heart rate, etc. A light jog rather then all out.

[quote]Beatnik wrote:
picture running in an aerobic pace/aerobic zone. Rather then an all out sprint. Inter spaced with lower intensity running. even walking.

Anaerobic is fast enough that your body goes into oxygen debt. This debt needs to be recovered later, whilst aerobic can have its oxygen needs met immediately.

So, you can measure this with pace, heart rate, etc. A light jog rather then all out.
[/quote]

I think you’re confusing oxygen debt with oxygen deficit.

Oxygen deficit is the ‘lag’ in oxygen consumption where anaerobic energy systems have to supply ATP because your body doesn’t have the oxygen to rely on the oxidative phosphorylation energy system. Oxygen debt occurs at the beginning of exercise.

Oxygen debt occurs after exercise when you are consuming more oxygen than the activity you are participating in requires, but this increased oxygen consumption has other functions (providing oxygen to replenish ATP stores and eliminate metabolites from muscle tissue post exercise).

This is known as EPOC (excess post exercise oxygen consumption). Generally, the greater the intensity of exercise and the lower the rest intervals between exertions, the higher the EPOC.

Let me make a few generalizations:

The greater the relative speed you run at and the greater the rest interval you utilize, the more anaerobic the interval training you are using will be.

The lesser the relative speed you run at and the lesser the rest interval you utilize, the more aerobic the interval training you are using will be.

Whatever happened to Slow, Medium, and Fast?

For all this talk on Interval Training of Fat Loss over the last few years, I’ve yet to see ANYONE post something along the lines of

“Here’s my plan: I’m gonna do 5 100m Sprints on a 35 second interval.”

or

“I’m gonna do 10 Sled Sprints with 90 pounds and rest 1 minute after each sprint.”

What are you even ASKING here?

Are you worried about the subtle distinction between “High-Intensity” Anerobic Interval Training an “High-Intensity” Aerobic Interval Training?

Does the answer to this Question even MATTER to you? What difference will it make in your training Plans? Do you have ANY Plans?

What do you want to do? Do you want to lose fat? Do you want to get in better CV Shape?
Just pick SOMETHING and do it. Everything works and nothing works forever. Don’t worry, there are more than 5 ways to train.

[quote]FightingScott wrote:
Whatever happened to Slow, Medium, and Fast?

For all this talk on Interval Training of Fat Loss over the last few years, I’ve yet to see ANYONE post something along the lines of

“Here’s my plan: I’m gonna do 5 100m Sprints on a 35 second interval.”

or

“I’m gonna do 10 Sled Sprints with 90 pounds and rest 1 minute after each sprint.”

What are you even ASKING here?

Are you worried about the subtle distinction between “High-Intensity” Anerobic Interval Training an “High-Intensity” Aerobic Interval Training?

Does the answer to this Question even MATTER to you? What difference will it make in your training Plans? Do you have ANY Plans?

What do you want to do? Do you want to lose fat? Do you want to get in better CV Shape?
Just pick SOMETHING and do it. Everything works and nothing works forever. Don’t worry, there are more than 5 ways to train. [/quote]

Excellent answer. Thank you. I do want to lean out and know the difference between the two HIITs as I’d thought there was any.

You’re completely right everything works for some time.

Cheers

PS. I do have a training plans.

[quote]Flow wrote:
Beatnik wrote:
picture running in an aerobic pace/aerobic zone. Rather then an all out sprint. Inter spaced with lower intensity running. even walking.

Anaerobic is fast enough that your body goes into oxygen debt. This debt needs to be recovered later, whilst aerobic can have its oxygen needs met immediately.

So, you can measure this with pace, heart rate, etc. A light jog rather then all out.

I think you’re confusing oxygen debt with oxygen deficit.

Oxygen debt is the ‘lag’ in oxygen consumption where anaerobic energy systems have to supply ATP because your body doesn’t have the oxygen to rely on the oxidative phosphorylation energy system. Oxygen debt occurs at the beginning of exercise.

Oxygen deficit occurs after exercise when you are consuming more oxygen than the activity you are participating in requires, but this increased oxygen consumption has other functions (providing oxygen to replenish ATP stores and eliminate metabolites from muscle tissue post exercise). This is known as EPOC (excess post exercise oxygen consumption). Generally, the greater the intensity of exercise and the lower the rest intervals between exertions, the higher the EPOC.

Let me make a few generalizations:

The greater the relative speed you run at and the greater the rest interval you utilize, the more anaerobic the interval training you are using will be.

The lesser the relative speed you run at and the lesser the rest interval you utilize, the more aerobic the interval training you are using will be.
[/quote]

Great explanation. Thanks.