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Difference Between Sumo Deadlift & Regular?

Whats the difference between a Sumo deadlift and a regular deadlift regards what muscles are used ? I should imagine its similar however I would think that they must overload/stress the muscles differently.

Also which of the two do you think gives the most bang for buck ?

Sumo deadlift relies more heavily on the quads and hip flexors while the conventional deadlift relies more heavily on the posterior chain.

If the goal is to deadlift the most weight, use whichever one most benefits your levers. If it is general strength development, I would pick the conventional deadlift over the sumo. If it is muscular development, I would honestly pick different movements entirely instead of deadlifting.

sumo-deadlift is nice for leg days. I usually sumo after front-squatting. I officially replaced Leg Pressing with Sumo DLing.

but like T3hPwnisher stated: A lot of it has to do with your body’s levers.

  • short arms/long arms
  • short legs/long legs
  • short torso/long torso
    etc

I know Matt Ogus(popular, young, natural bodybuilder) almost exclusively sumo-deads. He just posted a sumo-deadlift of 550lbs for 4-5 reps.

Thanks for the replies,I think I read somewhere that the sumo version works your quads and traps more plus takes some of the strain off the lower back all of which appeals.
so far I have only ever done conventional deadlifts which I think suits my body type but was thinking of maybe throwing in a couple of sets of the sumo style to see how it feels hence my questions.

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
Sumo deadlift relies more heavily on the quads and hip flexors while the conventional deadlift relies more heavily on the posterior chain.

If the goal is to deadlift the most weight, use whichever one most benefits your levers. If it is general strength development, I would pick the conventional deadlift over the sumo. If it is muscular development, I would honestly pick different movements entirely instead of deadlifting.[/quote]

Would you recommend snatch grip deadlifts for muscular development?

[quote]Mina293 wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
Sumo deadlift relies more heavily on the quads and hip flexors while the conventional deadlift relies more heavily on the posterior chain.

If the goal is to deadlift the most weight, use whichever one most benefits your levers. If it is general strength development, I would pick the conventional deadlift over the sumo. If it is muscular development, I would honestly pick different movements entirely instead of deadlifting.[/quote]

Would you recommend snatch grip deadlifts for muscular development?[/quote]

snatch grip deads will improve your grip strength, and focus more of the attention in your upper neck area and to some extent your lats. If you are going to snatch-grip, why not “Snatch Grip Rack Pulls”. Those make more sense(To me at least) to do instead of actual deadlifts with a snatch grip.

Here, snatch grip rack pulls :

What you said makes sense if my main goal is upper back training. I do full ROM snatch grip deadlifts because they add mass overall (back, glutes, hams), or do they? Please correct me if I’m wrong, but I read that they stretch your hamstrings due to the lower pulling position which recruits them more.

[quote]Mina293 wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
Sumo deadlift relies more heavily on the quads and hip flexors while the conventional deadlift relies more heavily on the posterior chain.

If the goal is to deadlift the most weight, use whichever one most benefits your levers. If it is general strength development, I would pick the conventional deadlift over the sumo. If it is muscular development, I would honestly pick different movements entirely instead of deadlifting.[/quote]

Would you recommend snatch grip deadlifts for muscular development?[/quote]

I have never used them before. The majority if my heavy pulling is mat pulls.

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]Mina293 wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
Sumo deadlift relies more heavily on the quads and hip flexors while the conventional deadlift relies more heavily on the posterior chain.

If the goal is to deadlift the most weight, use whichever one most benefits your levers. If it is general strength development, I would pick the conventional deadlift over the sumo. If it is muscular development, I would honestly pick different movements entirely instead of deadlifting.[/quote]

Would you recommend snatch grip deadlifts for muscular development?[/quote]

I have never used them before. The majority if my heavy pulling is mat pulls.
[/quote]

Then what are the other movements you’d recommend instead of deadlifting?

[quote]Mina293 wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]Mina293 wrote:

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:
Sumo deadlift relies more heavily on the quads and hip flexors while the conventional deadlift relies more heavily on the posterior chain.

If the goal is to deadlift the most weight, use whichever one most benefits your levers. If it is general strength development, I would pick the conventional deadlift over the sumo. If it is muscular development, I would honestly pick different movements entirely instead of deadlifting.[/quote]

Would you recommend snatch grip deadlifts for muscular development?[/quote]

I have never used them before. The majority if my heavy pulling is mat pulls.
[/quote]

Then what are the other movements you’d recommend instead of deadlifting?
[/quote]

Which muscles are you trying to build? That will affect the answer.

Hamstring, glutes and upper back. Romanian and stiff legged deads make me feel like I’m tweaking something. Snatch grip deads make my hams feel great and get my upper back sore, yet my upper back is not the limiting factor, which is why I like it. Just a newb’s thoughts.

[quote]Mina293 wrote:
Hamstring, glutes and upper back. Romanian and stiff legged deads make me feel like I’m tweaking something. Snatch grip deads make my hams feel great and get my upper back sore, yet my upper back is not the limiting factor, which is why I like it. Just a newb’s thoughts.[/quote]

For the upperback, I think mat/block pulls are a far superior movement. They allow you to emphasize the part of the deadlift that overloads the upperback without having to deal with the full ROM.

For hamstrings and glutes, I feel squat variations do a better job than the deadlift. Glute ham raises are also a great pick.

In reality, I do very little deadlifting to build my deadlift. The majority of my time is spent with mat pulls and safety squat bar squats, with me only deadlifting once every 2 months. I think the deadlift is an excellent way to display strength, but to build a bigger deadlift, I train away from it.

Thanks for the feedback.