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Dietary Fat Necessarily Stored as Fat?

Hi all,

Just from reading various resources and opinions on tweaking diet, and looking at macronutrient intake, I have in the last couple of weeks come across the opinion from a few authors to avoid fat with large carbohydrate meals - the reason being carbohydrates when broken down in glucose in the body will drive up insulin.

While the insulin spike will drive glucose into the muscles which is desirable, the insulin spike will also promote the storage of dietary fat which will be stored as fat in adipose tissues. I read a somewhat differing opinion which also advises against dietary fat post workout but the reason offered is that taking fat post workout curbs the insulin response, thus preventing the desired insulin spike.

Also, as a damage limitation exercise when drinking alcohol, have you found any benefit in avoiding dietary fat the day of a planned drinking session? The reason supposedly being that alcohol curbs fat metabolism due to it’s detoxification being “prioritised” by the liver - therefore if you eat fat while drinking, it gets stored directly as fat rather than being metabolised or used as energy.

Just wondering if anyone has experiences on whether or not the intake of fat in these situations is significant. Thanks

I believe that many of the claims against post-workout fat have been repudiated; the insulin spike following training is apparently not as key as was once thought.

If training makes insulin more effective then why does one need more of it directly after training?

Storing fat is not an issue as long as the overall energy balance is either neutral (or negative) for one’s needs. A person who regularly trains intensely does not have anything to worry about.

My own personal belief is that is better to eat fat and protein together post training rather than carbohydrate and protein: fat slows down digestion and allows protein to gradually be released to the bloodstream where it can be more easily utilized. Insulin sensitivity or not, too much protein hitting the bloodstream all at once will mean a lot of it gets wasted in gluconeogenesis or fat storage once glycogen has been fully restored.

This is why protein powders tend to make people fat and not muscular - it’s too fast absorbing.

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:
If training makes insulin more effective then why does one need more of it directly after training?

Storing fat is not an issue as long as the overall energy balance is either neutral (or negative) for one’s needs. A person who regularly trains intensely does not have anything to worry about.

My own personal belief is that is better to eat fat and protein together post training rather than carbohydrate and protein: fat slows down digestion and allows protein to gradually be released to the bloodstream where it can be more easily utilized. Insulin sensitivity or not, too much protein hitting the bloodstream all at once will mean a lot of it gets wasted in gluconeogenesis or fat storage once glycogen has been fully restored.

This is why protein powders tend to make people fat and not muscular - it’s too fast absorbing.[/quote]

So, without going too far into GOMAD territory, would you say a pretty steady source of something like whole milk, half&half, or even cream, would be a good approach? Probably starting before the workout so there’s some time for the amino acids to break down before the workout?

[quote]LoRez wrote:

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:
If training makes insulin more effective then why does one need more of it directly after training?

Storing fat is not an issue as long as the overall energy balance is either neutral (or negative) for one’s needs. A person who regularly trains intensely does not have anything to worry about.

My own personal belief is that is better to eat fat and protein together post training rather than carbohydrate and protein: fat slows down digestion and allows protein to gradually be released to the bloodstream where it can be more easily utilized. Insulin sensitivity or not, too much protein hitting the bloodstream all at once will mean a lot of it gets wasted in gluconeogenesis or fat storage once glycogen has been fully restored.

This is why protein powders tend to make people fat and not muscular - it’s too fast absorbing.[/quote]

So, without going too far into GOMAD territory, would you say a pretty steady source of something like whole milk, half&half, or even cream, would be a good approach? Probably starting before the workout so there’s some time for the amino acids to break down before the workout?[/quote]

The honest answer is that I don’t know. I cannot handle whole milk but small amounts of half & half are no problem. I also train in a fasted state.

My belief, based only upon my own anecdotal evidence, is that anabolism happens at night when I sleep so I supply the majority of them before bed when they will be needed most.

[quote]Joey90 wrote:
I have in the last couple of weeks come across the opinion from a few authors to avoid fat with large carbohydrate meals -
[/quote]

Since I myself have bought into this sort of thinking, mainly reading Coach Thib’s nutrition rants, for me this approach has produced better overall body composition in the last 4 months. There will always be all 3 macros in every meal but I’ve had positive results avoiding carbs+fat meals like rat poison, sticking to fat+protien and carbs+protien with trace amounts of the third macro.

[quote]LIFTICVSMAXIMVS wrote:
If training makes insulin more effective then why does one need more of it directly after training?

[/quote]

What kinds of carbs do you use per-workout? I’m assuming since you don’t believe in the insulin spike, they certainly wouldn’t be fast carbs like dextrose/sucrose.

I’m just thinking of switching up my peri-workout carb routine which right now is Gatorade powder and rice milk because I too am starting to believe the insulin spike is not that necessary, at least for endo’s who are already on the shit end of the insulin release curve…

[quote]kgildner wrote:
I believe that many of the claims against post-workout fat have been repudiated; [/quote]

Yes, via research and anecdotally

Pls allow me to rephrase this - it was logical to think ‘immediate insulin spike’ + ‘immediate glycogen replenishment’ was ideal.

But it turns out this was short-sighted. (ie. not the first time we’ve lost sight of the big-picture, nor the last)