T Nation

Diet Soda Boosts Testosterone

DIET SODA BOOSTS TESTOSTERONE!

Let me explain.

Diet soda sweetened with Aspartame is good for boosting testosterone levels however you would need to drink 42-12oz cans per day.

One diet can of soda contains 180mg of aspartame
(72mg of aspartic acid & 90mg of phenylalanine).

Aspartame is made up of 2 amino acids:
L-aspartic acid 40% of the total volume of Aspartame by weight.
L-phenylalanine 50% of the total volume of Aspartame by weight.

  • Aspartic acid (abbreviated as Asp or D) is sold as:

D-aspartic acid powder

taken in 3gm doses to boost testosterone increases of up to 45%. There is 72mg of aspartic acid in each can of soda.

  • Phenylalanine is a precursor to the amino acid tyrosine. Tyrosine is necessary for the synthesis of proteins and the production of the neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine. phenylalanine plays a role in mood, appetite and mental alertness. It functions and acts as a building block for numerous proteins that are produced in the body phenylalanine is an extremely important nutrient that must be obtained through the diet or supplementation.

Dietary sources: beef, poultry, pork, fish, milk, yogurt, eggs, cheese, soy products and certain nuts, seeds, Bananas. The body requires phenylalanine to synthesize epinephrine, dopamine and norepinephrine, three neurotransmitters in the brain.

Other ingredients: Citric Acid, Caffeine,

Phosphoric Acid - is also an ingredient in over-the-counter anti-nausea medications and used in many teeth whiteners to eliminate plaque.

More Aspartame info:
Because aspartame breaks down into amino acids in the body, it behaves like a protein, providing an energy value of 4 kcal/g.

This energy value is the same as sugar, but since aspartame is used in very small quantities, food and beverage manufacturers can advertise their products as calorie-free.

Does Aspartame/Diet Soda raise blood glucose/sugar levels?

Question by XanderBuilt: Does Aspartame/Diet Soda raise blood glucose/sugar levels?

Answer: No

Med Pro,

Although you have posted some valid and valuable topics on this forum, this unfortunately is one I can not agree with.

First off, Aspartame contains methanol and two amino acids as you mentioned: aspartic acid and phenylalanine.

Aspartic acid is an excitotoxin that can overstimulate neurons in the brain, causing them to die. (For more information about excitotoxins, consult neurologist Russell L. Blaylock?s excellent book Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills). Going back to Biology 101, the primary function of neuron receptors is that they enable brain cells to communicate with each other. Excitotoxins, however, overstimulate neuron receptors to the point of exhaustion and death. The areas of the brain that are primarily affected are the temporal lobes and the hypothalamus, which have many important functions. For example, the hypothalamus helps regulate blood pressure and heart rate, and the temporal lobes are involved in immune functions, sleep cycles and long-term memory.

Aspartame has been associated with 92 different health side effects, including vision damage, depression, high blood pressure, insomnia and PMS. If these facts are not enough to convince you, consider that aspartame is often made with genetically modified organisms, which are associated with a laundry list of health problems.

And then there is methanol, more commonly known as wood alcohol. Although methanol works great for relieving the pain of cuts and for cleaning your windshield, it?s probably not a good idea to be putting it in your body.

Finally, while aspartame will not raise blood glucose levels, you have not mentioned the subsequent release of insulin that DOES follow. Consuming such an amount of diet soda is a great way to promote insulin resistance. It is well established that men with poorer insulin sensitivity or diabetes have low testosterone and this connection is associated with a greater percentage of body fat, less lean mass, poor general health, and lack of sexual health.

Unfortunately, while it looks good on paper, aspartame is very unlikely to live up to the hype you’ve created here.

What gets me is how Aspartame compared to other dietary sources of it’s constituent AA’s is inconsequential. Even the small amounts of Methanol that accompany Aspartame are dismissible. Which leads the question of how would trace amounts of Aspartic Acid/Phenylalanine be Neurotoxic?

[quote]hungryone wrote:
Med Pro,

Although you have posted some valid and valuable topics on this forum, this unfortunately is one I can not agree with.

First off, Aspartame contains methanol and two amino acids as you mentioned: aspartic acid and phenylalanine.

Aspartic acid is an excitotoxin that can overstimulate neurons in the brain, causing them to die. (For more information about excitotoxins, consult neurologist Russell L. Blaylock?s excellent book Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills). Going back to Biology 101, the primary function of neuron receptors is that they enable brain cells to communicate with each other. Excitotoxins, however, overstimulate neuron receptors to the point of exhaustion and death. The areas of the brain that are primarily affected are the temporal lobes and the hypothalamus, which have many important functions. For example, the hypothalamus helps regulate blood pressure and heart rate, and the temporal lobes are involved in immune functions, sleep cycles and long-term memory.

Aspartame has been associated with 92 different health side effects, including vision damage, depression, high blood pressure, insomnia and PMS. If these facts are not enough to convince you, consider that aspartame is often made with genetically modified organisms, which are associated with a laundry list of health problems.

And then there is methanol, more commonly known as wood alcohol. Although methanol works great for relieving the pain of cuts and for cleaning your windshield, it?s probably not a good idea to be putting it in your body.

Finally, while aspartame will not raise blood glucose levels, you have not mentioned the subsequent release of insulin that DOES follow. Consuming such an amount of diet soda is a great way to promote insulin resistance. It is well established that men with poorer insulin sensitivity or diabetes have low testosterone and this connection is associated with a greater percentage of body fat, less lean mass, poor general health, and lack of sexual health.

Unfortunately, while it looks good on paper, aspartame is very unlikely to live up to the hype you’ve created here.[/quote]

Flim-flam.

idk if it does or does not, but i think ill just stick too getting in my fats and lifting heavy…

hungryone… What do you disagree with?
That Aspartic Acid has no impact on testosterone?
Or are you simply stating your dislike for Aspartame based on you perceived beliefs?

This is Heavy,

GOOGLE the following article:

Health Effects of the Artificial Sweetener Aspartame Jeanne Wahlen

and OPEN YOUR EYES TO SCIENE!!!


hungryone wrote: Aspartame has been associated with 92 different health side effects
And then there is methanol, more commonly known as wood alcohol. Finally, while aspartame will not raise blood glucose levels, you have not mentioned the subsequent release of insulin that DOES follow.


hungryone… I dont follow what Some experts BELIEVE and write in articles.
People THINK that the title -MD- qualifies them as the word of god.
SHOW ME THE SCIENCE BABY!
I BELIEVE what experts and science can prove!

1st off,

Dr Russell L. Blaylock is the most widely CRITICIZED and DISPROVEN doctors of our modern age!

When ANYONE quotes BLAYLOCK, I know instantly they lack research.

See what Snopes.com
said about aspartame Dr Blaylock

Forgive me, I mean no ill will but you really need to research more about him and his theories. This guy is a total QUACK

Also Wiki the Aspartame_controversy

Also, Show Me ONE scientific ARTICAL that SHOWS INSULIN is affected by Aspartame in any way!

I can tell you as a someone who consumes an average of 2.5g of aspartame per day, my glucose levels NEVER exceed 100! Studies have shown people who dont get glucose in their blood and become hypoglycemic will eat in excess causing insulin spikes. For those who know how to stabilize their glucose, they never have an issue!!!

Aspartame absorbs into the body, where it breaks down into methanol, aspartic acid, and phenylalanine and all three metabolites naturally occur in the body no matter what dose you ingest. Taken SEPARATELY…however… can cause harm in VERY, VERY high doses.

WHO THE HELL WOULD TAKE THESE CHEMICALS SEPEARATELY IN SUPPER MEGA SKY HIGH MONSTER DOSES ANYHOW?

So you know just ONE BANANNA, yes just one bananna has 10TIMES the amount of methanol than does on can of diet soda!!! WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT THAT? Don’t take my word for it… Reasearch it for yourself!

As I said earlier, 1 can of diet soda has 180mg of Aspartame

Example:
Harmful Ingested amounts for a 200lb person:

METHANOL (10% of Aspartame by Vol) - 45.5g or 500 mg of methanol per kg of body weight

That = 237 Gallons of Diet Soda!!!

DID I SAY GALLONS??? I DID!

Researchers have studied whether methanol levels in the blood rise significantly when humans consume aspartame. In one study, subjects were given 34 mg-aspartame/kg body weight. Blood levels did not rise detectably [Filer Jr. and Stegink, 1989]. Another experiment showed that blood methanol levels did not rise even when subjects consumed 200 mg-aspartame/kg body weight [Stegink and Filer Jr., 1984]. In long term studies, researchers found that when humans consume aspartame, the resulting formate production is balanced by excretion, so that blood levels of formate do not change [Leon and others, 1989]. Another indication that humans can safely consume products sweetened with aspartame is that these products contain less methanol than some natural food substances. For example, fruit juices contain an average of 140 mg-methanol/L, but an aspartame-sweetened diet soft drink contains only 56 mg-methanol/L [Kretchmer and Hollenbeck, 1991]. According to this data, the methanol in aspartame poses no risk to humans.

Effects of Aspartic Acid. [Stegink and Filer Jr., 1984]. [Kretchmer and Hollenbeck, 1991]. Under normal conditions, aspartic acid does not harm humans because it is excluded from the brain by the blood-brain barrier, but at high doses it can cross the barrier and cause damage.
In a study on aspartic acid and glutamate, humans were given approximately 200 mg-aspartame/kg body weight. The combined plasma levels of aspartic acid and glutamate peaked at about 7 mM/100 mL [Stegink and others, 1980]. This level is only one-twentieth of that necessary to cause brain damage in infant mice [Kretchmer and Hollenbeck, 1991]. According to this data, humans who consume aspartame do not have to worry about being harmed by combined levels of aspartic acid and glutamate.

Effects of Phenylalanine. A series of studies looked into this possibility. In one experiment, twelve normal individuals (six men, six women) and eight women heterozygous for PKU were given 34 mg-aspartame/kg body weight in one serving after a period of fasting. The levels of phenylalanine in the blood were only 5 microM/100 mL higher for the PKU-heterozygous subjects. According to this research, this small increase in phenylalanine concentration does not pose a risk to PKU-heterozygous individuals [Kretchmer and Hollenbeck, 1991].

References
Filer Jr., L.J., and L.D. Stegink, “Aspartame Metabolism in Normal Adults, Phenylketonuric Heterozygotes and Diabetic Subjects,” Diabetes Care, vol 12 (1989), pp. 67-74.

Food and Drug Administration, “Food Additives Permitted for Direct Addition to Food for Human Consumption: Aspartame,” denial of request for hearing, Federal Register, 49 (1984), pp. 6672-6682.

Hough, C.A.M., K.J. Parker, and A.J. Vlitos, ed., Developments in Sweeteners vol. 1 (London: Applied Science Publishers Ltd, 1979), pp. 130-131.

Kretchmer, Norman, and Clari B. Hollenbeck, ed., Sugars and Sweeteners (Boca Raton: CRC Press, 1991), pp. 151-167, 232-237.

Leon, S.A., D.B. Hunninghake, C. Bell, D.K. Rassin, and T.R. Tephly, “Safety of Long-Term Large Doses of Aspartame,” Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 149 (1989), pp. 2318-2324.

O’Brien, Lyn N., and Robert C. Gelardi (editors), Alternative Sweeteners, 2nd ed. (New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc. 1991).

Olney, J.W., N.B. Farber, E. Speitzanagel, and L.N. Robins, “Increasing Brain Cancer Rates: Is There a Link to Aspartame?” Journal of Neuropathol Exp Neurol, vol 55. (1996), pp. 115-23.

Roberts, H.J., Aspartame (NutraSweet): Is it Safe? (Philadelphia: The Charles Press, 1990), pp. 15 and 21.

Stegink, Lewis D., and L.J. Filer Jr., ed., Aspartame: Physiology and Biochemistry (New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc., 1984), pp. 47-109; 248-253.

Stegink, L.D., L.J. Filer Jr., G.L. Baker, and J.E. McDonnell, “Effect of an Abuse Dose of Aspartame Upon Plasma and Erythrocyte Amino Acid Levels of Amino Acids in Phenylketonuric Heterozygous and Normal Adult Subjects,” Journal of Nutrition, vol. 110 (1980), p. 2216.

Tephly, T.R., and K.E. McMartin, “Methanol Metabolism and Toxicity,” in Aspartame: Physiology and Biochemistry, ed. by L.D. Stegink and L.J. Filer Jr. (New York: Marcel Dekker, 1984), p. 111.

Tschanz, Christian, Harriet H. Butchko, W. Wayne Stargel, and Frank N. Kotsonis, ed., The Clinical Evaluation of a Food Additive: Assessment of Aspartame (Boca Raton: CRC Press, 1996), pp. 29-32, 183-193, 195-204.

Med Pro.

You are an idiot. Long term, Aspartame gives you cancer and destoys the CNS.

Whilst in small, occasional quantities it is OK…I would NOT really on diet soda to boost test…wtf.

Don’t bother arguing or replying as I am not going to revisit this topic. When YOU become more familiar with science, then return/reply.

GJ

cocaine can be a workout enhancer too or a good weight loss drug :wink:

@Medpro You forgot to put the authors name of all that copying and pasting. I like how you also left out her conclusions. Stellar work painting half a picture. Although i’m not a 100 % against aspartame I’m always over skeptical when the FDA/media just want to jam aspartame down your throat.

Wow Med-Pro,

Your reply could possibly be even more stupid than your original post. I sincerely hope that you are not a legitimate medical professional.

First off, you may not necessarily have to agree with Dr. Blaylock’s views, but he is a respected neurosurgeon who has contributed a significant amount to scientific knowledge. Read his book, his research is in there. And quoting him by no means automatically means I haven’t done my research, which I’ll display later.

Secondly let’s look at some issues with your argument:

  1. Aspartame contains L-aspartic acid. You erroneously make the connection that the L-aspartic acid in aspartame will boost testosterone; when in fact, it is D-aspartic acid that has been used in supplementation to boost test. Anyone with a basic understanding of organic chemistry understands that the L and D forms of these chemicals are significantly different and NOT interchangeable. But I guess you lack that basic understanding.

  2. While it is great that you consume 2.5g of aspartame a day (it is clear that it has already caused neurotoxicity in your brain), I never once said that aspartame raises blood glucose. It clearly doesn’t. The distinction I made is that aspartame still causes INSULIN to be released. Excess insulin release is a great way to create insulin resistance, which has been significantly correlated to low testosterone. Obviously, the inter-play between hormones is beyond the scope of this forum post. Furthermore, the argument “I do it; therefore it must work” is completely stupid.

  3. Phenylalanine is not a precursor to tyrosine. Both are amino acids and are distinctly different. Again, if you had taken an introductory university level biology course, you’d understand this error.

  4. Thank you for suggesting Snopes.com and Wikipedia.org as credible scientific sources. Clearly you’ve done some extensive research.

  5. There is no research showing bananas have a higher methanol content than diet sodas. (Remember: snopes and wikipedia don’t count as reliable sources)

  6. You decide to present research that shows the levels of the constituent parts of aspartame are “safe” for health. These are known toxic compounds. By this same logic, you should then agree that there is a safe level of formaldehyde consumption (LD50=100mg/kg) or antifreeze (LD50=4700mg/kg) consumption, no? As long as you stay under those doses, there will be no adverse effects. Unfortunately, it doesn’t work like that - and as is the case with aspartame, it can take some time for adverse effects to appear (I’d bet $50,000 on you developing Parkinson’s disease in the future).

  7. As for your stringent research; I want to personally thank you for posting the most relevant studies from 1984 to 1996. Surely, all these studies are all still applicable since research on aspartame hasn’t changed once since this time period.

  8. Finally, let’s take a look at some current and relevant research. You said you wanted me to show you the science, well here it is:

First Experimental Demonstration of the Multipotential Carcinogenic Effects of Aspartame Administered in the Feed to Sprague-Dawley Rats

Aspartame administered in feed, beginning prenatally through life span, induces cancers of the liver and lung in male Swiss mice
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajim.20896/abstract;jsessionid=D8A566725DE922582FC7D6A9F8AE48F3.d03t04?userIsAuthenticated=false&deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=

Formaldehyde, aspartame, and migraines: a possible connection
http://while-science-sleeps.com/pdf/328.pdf

Aspartame and Incidence of Brain Malignancies

Aspartame Disease - A Possible Cause for Concomitant Graves’ Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC387446/

Is Aspartame Really Safer in Reducing the Risk of Hypoglycemia During Exercise in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes?

Fortunately, I believe the reader’s T-Nation are smart enough to figure out for themselves that consuming diet soda isn’t going to boost their testosterone. Furthermore, I’m willing to bet that the majority of them are well aware that they should significantly limit their intake of diet sodas.

Please go troll with this crap “article” on the bodybuilding.com forum. Those guys should believe you

I can’t believe you call yourself Med Pro

Seeing as we are referencing comments now:
Aspartame effects on the brain. Fernstrom, J. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2009) 63, 698?699

The following comments relate to the review by Humphries et al. (2007). The premise of the review, that the high-intensity sweetener aspartame is neurotoxic, ignores a very large scientific literature to the contrary, recently comprehensively summarized (Butchko et al., 2002; Magnuson et al., 2007).

The key point about aspartame is that very little is consumed. Because it is 180 times sweeter than sugar, relatively little shows up in products. For example, a 355 ml can of diet soda contains 180 mg of aspartame, which for a 70 kg human is a 2.5 mg/kg dose (1.25 mg/kg phenylalanine). After its introduction, its use was monitored for years, revealing that average daily dosing is barely 5 mg/kg/day (2.5 mg/kg/day phenylalanine), not much. As a comparison, the amount of phenylalanine in a quarter-pound hamburger is about 1000 mg, or 14 mg/kg phenylalanine (70 kg individual), or much more. It is important to keep this fact in mind when considering the authors’ arguments, which relate to studies in animals involving extremely high aspartame doses (for example, up to 2000 mg/kg in rats, a huge dose). Such studies have no relevance to human use. And, for aspartame to have effects in animals, blood levels of aspartame constituents (aspartate, phenylalanine, methanol) must increase to very high values. At the levels ingested by humans, such increases in blood do not occur, even at high levels of intake (Butchko et al., 2002; Magnuson et al., 2007).

The errors in this article are too numerous to enumerate in a letter of limited length. I note those most obvious to me. (a) Formate is not converted to diketopiperazine (abstract). (b) The authors are incorrect in stating that tyrosine cannot be synthesized in brain from phenylalanine. © Despite the authors’ statement, even very large increases in phenylalanine levels produced by aspartame administration to rats do not suppress catecholamine synthesis rate (Fernstrom et al., 1991). (d) Contrary to the authors’ statement, my 1983 Life Sciences paper did not find changes in regional brain catecholamine concentrations following aspartame dosing of rats. (e) Maher and Wurtman gave rats aspartame up to 2000 mg/kg, a huge dose. And their results could not be confirmed (see Butchko et al., 2002; Magnuson et al., 2007). (f) Aspartame does not enter the blood from the gut, and thus does not get into brain. Hence, brain glutamate receptors cannot be engaged directly by aspartame, despite the authors’ assertions. (g) Despite the authors’ statement, my 1994 Journal of the American Dietetic Association article does not state that aspartame increases brain levels of acidic amino acids. (h) There is no such thing as ?excitotoxic-saturated placental blood flow? caused by maternal aspartame consumption. (i) Finally, many erroneous statements have been obtained from two websites, one cited as Mehl-Madrona and the other as Bowen and Evangelista. These seem to me to be inappropriate references, as their contents have not been subjected to peer review, and contain unsupported speculation.

While I recognize the need for a continuing dialog on any issue relevant to human nutrition and health, here in relation to aspartame, in my view, the article by Humphries does not make an informed contribution.

Respone to stupidone I mean hungryone

  1. L and D forms of these aspartate chemicals are significantly different???

Aspartate L&D are EXACTLY the same chemical compound formula, structure, molecular weight and formula! The only difference is on is R and one is S and melting point!!!

If you are arguing Dextrorotation and levorotation??? You are a bigger idiot than I give you credit for!. In particular, both R and S stereocenters have the ability to be dextrorotatory or laevorotatory.

D-aspartic acid is formed when the enzyme aspartate racemase converts L-aspartic acid into D-aspartic acid in the testes significant increase in luteinizing hormone that signals the testes to produce more testosterone Again if you didnt catch that?

D-Aspartic Acid is converted from L-Aspartic in the testes via the aspartate racemase enzyme

Here try and follow!

Of the standard ±-amino acids, all but glycine can exist in either of two optical isomers, called L or D amino acids, which are mirror images of each other. While L-amino acids represent all of the amino acids found in proteins during translation in the ribosome, D-amino acids are found in some proteins produced by enzyme posttranslational modifications after translation and translocation to the endoplasmic reticulum, and D-serine may act as a neurotransmitter in the brain. The L and D convention for amino acid configuration refers not to the optical activity of the amino acid itself, but rather to the optical activity of the isomer of glyceraldehyde from which that amino acid can, in theory, be synthesized (D-glyceraldehyde is dextrorotary; L-glyceraldehyde is levorotatory). Almost all of the amino acids in proteins are (S) at the ± carbon, with cysteine being ® and glycine non-chiral. Cysteine is unusual since it has a sulfur atom at the second position in its side-chain, which has a larger atomic mass than the groups attached to the first carbon, which is attached to the ±-carbon in the other standard amino acids, thus the ® instead of (S).

  1. Again you this is stupidity! Insulin released in plasma causes hypoglycima. My illistration in glucose testing was only to explaine that I have tested during higher consentrations of Aspertame intake and never became hypoclycimic!

See: Effect of aspartame and protein, administered in phenylalanine-equivalent doses, on plasma neutral amino acids, aspartate, insulin and glucose in man. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

See: Aspartame ingestion with and without carbohydrate in phenylketonuric and normal subjects: effect on plasma concentrations of amino acids, glucose, and insulin. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Wolf-Novak LC, Stegink LD, Brummel MC, Persoon TJ, Filer LJ Jr, Bell EF, Ziegler EE, Krause WL.Source Department of Pediatrics, University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City.

See: Aspartame: neuropsychologic and neurophysiologic evaluation of acute and chronic effects. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Spiers PA, Sabounjian L, Reiner A, Myers DK, Wurtman J, Schomer DL. Source Clinical Research Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge 02139, USA.

  1. L-Phenylalanine is the precursor to tyrosine. Phenylalanine is converted to L-tyrosine in the LIVER HELLO!!! You need to read more! WOW! Introductory collage level UNDERGRADUATE physiology & Physiological Science course.

  2. See studies from the NCBI. The same organization you cut and paste from? You quote Dr. Blaylock? A reputed, discredited quack! PERIOD! Sorry!

  3. NO REASEARCH on the fermentation of bananas? There are many studies you fool on the fermentation properties of bananas. See: African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 10(18), pp. 3608-3615, 2 May, 2011 http://www.academicjournals.org/AJB ISSN 1684�??�??�??�?�¢??5315 �??�??�??�??�?�© 2011 Academic Journals Potential application of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for the fermentation of banana pulp

  4. AGAIN Sigh this is stupidity on your part. Taken in isolation yes toxic in mega amounts and was tested and shown not to negatively affect serum plasma levels what so ever!

  5. Parkinson from Aspartame? WOW Ladies and Gentlemen hungryone has discovered and stakes $50,000 that Aspartame causes Parkinsons. This despite billions spent to discover why Parkinsons occurs.

1st study referenced data for year average 1984 you hypocrite! Mice studies REALLY?

GOT ANY HUMAN STUDIES?

2nd MICE study was with induced cancer and only a few male mice grew cancer but not female? WTF? ALSO they did not speak about what type of feed nutrition was given? NO??? Very Bias!

3rd study speaks for itself!!! Quote: Although we recognize the limitations of drawing conclusions from a small sample of patients, we believe this observed association warrants further investigation.

4th study REALLY!?!?!? YOU Cant be that dumb can you???
One 455 calory breakfast
one aspartame meal 358 caloiees
One high-fat/low-carbohydrate meal 455 kcal
And fasting

We hypothesized that using fructose OR aspartame instead of sucrose??? WHAT??? would have a lower impact on insulin release and glucose response than a sucrose meal. REALLY??? WTF?!?!
the aspartame breakfast induced a similar rise in glucose and insulin levels at baseline than the sucrose meal. NOOOOOOOO SHIT!!!

and was 22% lower in calories and 10% lower in carbohydrates, with an inferior glycemic index? NO SHIT!!!

Indeed, the most dramatic reduction in plasma glucose level occurred in those with the highest 2-h postprandial plasma glucose levels? NO SHIT!!!

However, the fructose meal induced the lowest fall in blood glucose, with a 31% decrease from baseline. NO SHIT!!!

BECAUSE THE GUY IS A FRIKEN DIABETIC!!! HE CANT UTILIZE GLUCOSE!!!

This study is stupid in so many ways I dont know were to start!

1st off who gives a fuck about patients with diabeteies! We were talking about testosterone!

2nd There is no way to qunitify the degree of disease response in each patient metabolisum!

FUCK This is sooo stupid!

3rd to catogorize Aspertame with Fructose? Vs. Sucrose? Why even comment?

hungryone if this is all you have… SORRY, you didnt even come close to justifing a point. Rather you illistrated the weak argument many have tried to present due to being brain washed sheep.

Im done with you! Please go troll around to preach your anti Aspartame views on someone elses page that cares!. How do I block seening anymore of your comments?

Med Troll…

Test prop is far better than diet soda.

sounds like someone needs an excuse to drink tons of diet soda

[quote]AzCats wrote:
sounds like someone needs an excuse to drink tons of diet soda[/quote]

This is the impression I’m gettting too, or else he’s in the industry. Sounds like a serious addict justifying the addiction.

Aspartame is fucking TERRIBLE for you, one of the worst things you can put in your body.
It’s also been strongly linked to causing multiple sclerosis

[quote]Med Pro wrote:

  1. L and D forms of these aspartate chemicals are significantly different???

Aspartate L&D are EXACTLY the same chemical compound formula, structure, molecular weight and formula! The only difference is on is R and one is S and melting point!!!

[/quote]
Do you have proof of this? Most enzymes are specific to only one absolute configuration.