T Nation

Diet Issue?


#1

Is there anything in my diet (deficiency or toxicity) that would cause me to have orange palms/feet soles and a yellow tinge to my skin? The yellow skin may be that I work indoors and have a white olive skin tone but, you never know

I realize that the internet may have some answers but, there are also a lot of contradictions and wrong info. I got a hit saying that Magnesium deficiency may cause yellow skin but, no where else did it say that.

--These are the foods I eat often usually every day:

Chicken
eggs
coconut oil
olive oil
fish oil
broccoli
green beans
mixed veg. medley (corn,carrots,green beans)
white rice
potato
blue berries


#2

Is it jaundice? Go see a doctor. Nothing sticks out in your diet. Although, you didn’t specify the quantity you ate of each. Regardless, you should see a doctor.


#3

High beta carotene over time will give the color you describe, or similar to.

However if you don’t consume a beta carotene supplement, then the above foods would not provide enough beta carotene to give this effect.

I haven’t run an analysis of your described diet as that would take some time, and you provided no quantities, but I wouldn’t be surprised if you’d have some deficiencies if you don’t consume a multivitamin. While avoiding products with refined flour can be a good idea, it takes one off of the safety net provided by mandated supplementation of flour. You’d be relying entirely on your food intake, and white rice is, if not parboiled, nearly devoid of vitamins, and not knowing your intakes of vegetables, what you’re getting might be rather little.

I indeed would be concerned about jaundice and agree, seek medical advice.


#4

[quote]Bill Roberts wrote:
High beta carotene over time will give the color you describe, or similar to.

However if you don’t consume a beta carotene supplement, then the above foods would not provide enough beta carotene to give this effect.

I haven’t run an analysis of your described diet as that would take some time, and you provided no quantities, but I wouldn’t be surprised if you’d have some deficiencies if you don’t consume a multivitamin. While avoiding products with refined flour can be a good idea, it takes one off of the safety net provided by mandated supplementation of flour. You’d be relying entirely on your food intake, and white rice is, if not parboiled, nearly devoid of vitamins, and not knowing your intakes of vegetables, what you’re getting might be rather little.

I indeed would be concerned about jaundice and agree, seek medical advice.[/quote]

Thanks Bill. I actually do record what I eat online. I have no idea why I did not provide that. Took a shot of Cronometer, calories may vary a bit and I may eat some different foods but, I would say this is pretty avg.

Would that be enough Vitamin. A to cause issues?

Any advice on foods to add and/or supps?

Would something like Quinoa be better?


#5

I’m not sure, as I don’t have information on what amounts have been proven to do it.

I got quite orange personally back before being with Biotest, during a period in which I consumed six Met-Rx per day on most days, which was 30,000 IU/day beta carotene.

You’re at about half that level. Perhaps it’s possible.

If wishing to examine the jaundice possibility but not wishing to go to the expense and trouble of seeing a doctor, online blood tests are available. All you’d need to know to resolve the liver question would be serum bilirubin, but that’s not usually (I think) available as a separate test because it’s part of a standard CBC (comprehensive blood chemistry.) A CBC ordered online is only about $35-$50.

If it were me I might consider a blood test due to the seriousness of jaundice if it were the cause. On the other hand, if there’s absolutely no yellowing of the whites of the eyes, as non-medical opinion then jaundice so far as I know would be unlikely.


#6

On the diet, of course Vitamin D typically is not greatly present in food and the sun is the main natural source.

Unless you use iodized salt, the iodine is of course a disaster. It’s entirely possible to have a diet that provides ample iodine, for example by regularly having plenty of dairy, baked potatoes with skins, seafood, or turkey. But typically people do not consume enough of these foods to provide ample iodine, so iodized salt use or supplementation is necessary.

For Vitamin E, the richest sources of gamma tocopherol (which the above program likely does not count as being worth much if anything towards the RDA) are pistachios and corn, with amaranth, blueberries, and walnuts being moderate sources, and all kinds of things providing still-significant amounts. You might well have a good amount already, just not shown by the program. For alpha tocopherol, which the program absolutely will count, sunflower seeds and almonds are the richest sources.

For reason of balancing benefits of those nutrients versus it usually being undesirable to add to linoleic acid intake, among those I’d pick pistachios, almonds, and corn as potential Vitamin E sources.

On Omega-3, unfortunately the program does not distinguish between DHA, EPA, and ALA, so your amount of DHA is likely considerably less than the total given by the program. At least in terms of diet man has been adapted to over the long term (such as 100,000 years) the corresponding amounts of DHA, EPA, and ALA would be far higher than in your present diet.