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Diet for Strength, Not Bulk

Hello guys, i’m planing to increase my BW to a certain weight, then i’ll concentrate on training for strength (1-3 reps). But how will my diet be like since i don’t wanna bulk up more already? My goal is to add more plates to the bar and not add more muscle, just need to maintain my muscle mass.

Does that means i don’t need to care about diet anymore since it isn’t body building already? Or i still have to have some kind of diet to enable my CNS or muscle to recover for the next workout?

What kind of diet should i have?

thanks alot.

You can’t get stronger and not get bigger, it doesn’t work like that. You may be able to do it to a point, because the way you can get stronger is to recruit more muscle fibers (Which doesn’t make you bigger) or just make more muscle.

It’s not possible.

Why the hell don’t you want to be big anyway? That seems stupid to me. Being big is cool, it’s the in thing.

Getting huge is the new having abs.

[quote]Higgins wrote:
You can’t get stronger and not get bigger, it doesn’t work like that. You may be able to do it to a point, because the way you can get stronger is to recruit more muscle fibers (Which doesn’t make you bigger) or just make more muscle.

It’s not possible.

Why the hell don’t you want to be big anyway? That seems stupid to me. Being big is cool, it’s the in thing.

Getting huge is the new having abs.[/quote]

But i see some guys are strong and not big. (example, those in crossfit, they are not big but they have nice numbers on deads, squats etc.)

The reason being is because i want to have a great strength-BW ratio.

For weight class reasons for certain sports it is benificial to have a high strength bodyweight ratio. Of couse your diet matters. Keeping to your maintance calories will go a long way.

But why?

I mean, if you don’t want to gain weight, don’t eat as much. Eating maintenance is easy. But honestly, why not worry about getting strong first? The other bullshit can come later.

If you’re an athlete or something…you should’ve said so. =P

you can easily train for strength while not gaining weight, or at least very slow weight gains, find one of the thousands of programs made for strength and just have a normal diet, stay at maintenance, its pretty simple,

and im not here to judge if you want to be big or lean (not that you cant be both), thats dumb, its your body your decision

[quote]wfifer wrote:
But why?

I mean, if you don’t want to gain weight, don’t eat as much. Eating maintenance is easy. But honestly, why not worry about getting strong first? The other bullshit can come later.

If you’re an athlete or something…you should’ve said so. =P[/quote]

no i’m not an athlete. Ok maybe i didn’t explain it well. Let me explain again.

Main goal: strength. I don’t mind being bigger(muscle mass), but that will need me to take in lots of protein, which is troublesome for me and i don’t mind being small provided my lift numbers increases.

So my question is do i have to take in protein or some kind of minerals in veggies/fruits to recover my CNS/muscles for my 1-3 rep strength work and increase my lift?

[quote]Zendefone wrote:
wfifer wrote:
But why?

I mean, if you don’t want to gain weight, don’t eat as much. Eating maintenance is easy. But honestly, why not worry about getting strong first? The other bullshit can come later.

If you’re an athlete or something…you should’ve said so. =P

no i’m not an athlete. Ok maybe i didn’t explain it well. Let me explain again.

Main goal: strength. I don’t mind being bigger(muscle mass), but that will need me to take in lots of protein, which is troublesome for me and i don’t mind being small provided my lift numbers increases.

So my question is do i have to take in protein or some kind of minerals in veggies/fruits to recover my CNS/muscles for my 1-3 rep strength work and increase my lift?[/quote]

take as much protein as you want, just keep your daily caloric intake at maintenance, dont worry you arent at any risk of becoming hyuuuuge like that, its not that easy

[quote]believedat wrote:
you can easily train for strength while not gaining weight, or at least very slow weight gains, find one of the thousands of programs made for strength and just have a normal diet, stay at maintenance, its pretty simple,

and im not here to judge if you want to be big or lean (not that you cant be both), thats dumb, its your body your decision[/quote]

So normal as in 3 meals a day with a little protein and enough carbs for energy will do?

Just get to that bodyweight as quickly as possible and then figure it out. When you fight the fight of gaining weight, you’ll figure out what you need to eat to gain weight and what you need to stay the same.

Since you’ve asked the question “Does that mean I won’t need to care about diet anymore” I can safely assume you are FAR away from the bodyweight you will want to be at.

When I was 111 pound I thought I would be happy at 135. Then when I got to 135 I saw fight club and I wanted to be 155. Then when I got to 155 I saw the bodies of boxers, track athletes, and other guys and I wanted to be 185, then even before I made it to 185 I saw bodybuilders like Stefan Havik and powerlifters like Matt Kroc and I now I defiantly want to be at least over 225.

So that’s a 90 pound difference in what I thought my “ideal body” would be. Your ideas will likely change too over the course of fighting to gain muscle and gaining new perceptions of what’s jacked and what isn’t.

Unless you’re very short, you won’t be able to get away with staying light and adding pounds to the bar. Even the most CNS efficient lifters with the best bodyweight to lift ratios like Brian Schwab are quite jacked and have a ton of muscle per inch of height.

no always try to keep your protein intake high, just watch your daily caloric intake…

trust me, its not as easy as u take 200gs of protein per day, u lift 3 reps and u get big,

why dont u actually try it, see what ur body needs and adapt to it, but keep your protein high and if u really dont want to gain, watch ur total caloric intake, im trying to make it clear

[quote]believedat wrote:
no always try to keep your protein intake high, just watch your daily caloric intake…

trust me, its not as easy as u take 200gs of protein per day, u lift 3 reps and u get big,

why dont u actually try it, see what ur body needs and adapt to it, but keep your protein high and if u really dont want to gain, watch ur total caloric intake, im trying to make it clear[/quote]

Alright got it. But mind explaining why my protein should be high? So that my muscles can recover from those workouts and stay fresh for the next?

yes in simple terms thats right,

also your maintenance caloric intake should be around 2000-2500cals/day im guessing, (just a guess find out for yourself)

even if u take
200g protein thats only 800cals from protein,
u still got room for much more there for carbs/fat, so you can see u need to eat alot more to gain

[quote]FightingScott wrote:

When I was 111 pound I thought I would be happy at 135. Then when I got to 135 I saw fight club and I wanted to be 155. Then when I got to 155 I saw the bodies of boxers, track athletes, and other guys and I wanted to be 185, then even before I made it to 185 I saw bodybuilders like Stefan Havik and powerlifters like Matt Kroc and I now I defiantly want to be at least over 225.

So that’s a 90 pound difference in what I thought my “ideal body” would be. Your ideas will likely change too over the course of fighting to gain muscle and gaining new perceptions of what’s jacked and what isn’t.
[/quote]

x2 The exact same thing happened to me.

I think having a good bw to lift ratio is mostly genetic and has to do with you’re level of training (years). Just train for strength and eat for size. As the years go by, your ratio will get better and better.

[quote]believedat wrote:
yes in simple terms thats right,

also your maintenance caloric intake should be around 2000-2500cals/day im guessing, (just a guess find out for yourself)

even if u take
200g protein thats only 800cals from protein,
u still got room for much more there for carbs/fat, so you can see u need to eat alot more to gain[/quote]

oh, so you need high protein for strength work as well…then i might as well eat for size too. Since i thought i don’t need so high protein for gaining strength. Well, i don’t mind being big. :slight_smile:

[quote]Zendefone wrote:

oh, so you need high protein for strength work as well…then i might as well eat for size too. Since i thought i don’t need so high protein for gaining strength. Well, i don’t mind being big. :)[/quote]

Yay, another convertee.

As you get bigger and get all the perks coming from it, like people getting the fuck out of your way when your walking somewhere, you’ll enjoy it.

To get max strength, you gotta get “bigger”. You won’t randomly wake up 250 lbs one day. It’s hard as fuck to gain a lot of weight.

[quote]elano wrote:
FightingScott wrote:

When I was 111 pound I thought I would be happy at 135. Then when I got to 135 I saw fight club and I wanted to be 155. Then when I got to 155 I saw the bodies of boxers, track athletes, and other guys and I wanted to be 185, then even before I made it to 185 I saw bodybuilders like Stefan Havik and powerlifters like Matt Kroc and I now I defiantly want to be at least over 225.

So that’s a 90 pound difference in what I thought my “ideal body” would be. Your ideas will likely change too over the course of fighting to gain muscle and gaining new perceptions of what’s jacked and what isn’t.

x2 The exact same thing happened to me.

I think having a good bw to lift ratio is mostly genetic and has to do with you’re level of training (years). Just train for strength and eat for size. As the years go by, your ratio will get better and better.[/quote]

To add to that, I think in training to bring both strength and size to a maximum you will eventually fall into what you are best suited for.

Trey Brewer started out training as a Powerlifter and fell into bodybuilding.

Justin Harris started out training as a Bodybuilder and fell into powerlifting.

You really can’t go wrong with trying to get both big and strong. If you find out 5 or 8 years down the road that you can gain a lot of strength with little mass gains then great, you’re better suited for powerlifting. If you find out that you can make big gains in lean mass with little or no change to your strength gains then great, you’re better suited for bodybuilding.

But you won’t be able to know for sure which path is better for you without spending a good, long while pursuing both strength and size.

And rest assured, there is no diet or training program out there that will get you ‘too big’ without your full knowledge.

[quote]Higgins wrote:
It’s hard as fuck to gain a lot of weight.[/quote]

AMEN!

[quote]Trenchant wrote:
Higgins wrote:
It’s hard as fuck to gain a lot of muscle mass.
[/quote]

Fixed

Its easy as fuck to gain weight, go on the twinkie / oreo diet… take up playing video games, and stop doing any / all physical work.

[quote]Zendefone wrote:
Alright got it. But mind explaining why my protein should be high? So that my muscles can recover from those workouts and stay fresh for the next?[/quote]

I see you have the same goal as me: strength.

To make it clear and simple, there are three ways of increasing strength:
1- Improving the neuromuscular system: you train your body to use as much muscle fibers as possible. Thus, it it possible to gain strength without gaining any muscle mass. Of course there is a limit to this, you will eventually need to grow some muscles.

2- Myofibrillar hypertrophy: you will gain muscle mass that will be necessary to improve your strength. Don’t be afraid to become heavier. You are gaining good muscle quality.

3- sarcoplasmic Hypertrophy: Used by bodybuilders, lot of muscle mass, less strength.

I’m assuming that you are planning to use the first method. Thus, heavy lifting(1-3 reps) will be required. This kind of training break down muscles, which will increase your demand in protein if you want to recover properly. Also, you will eventually hit a plateau and will have to use the second method to grow some muscles in order to become stronger.

Conclusion: lot of proteins, clean diet, healthy food for great performance.