T Nation

Designing Workout: Early and Long Term Steps


#1

Thanks for the consideration.

My goal is to build a desired body shape/structure. I have a provoking doubt though,that is,the body structure/shape we will build or develop in the future,will it depend upon what workout type/split/routine/cycle and diet we follow today as a beginner,precisely.

If ,yes, then how should we design our workout style/program today to build the desired body shape/structure in the future?
If,no,then can we build our desired body structure at any interval during our training?
I came across many articles like beginner's workout,bodybuilding for beginners to name a few,but I don't recall coming across articles concerning my doubt.

I really appreciate detailed answers and your efforts.
Please,if any,comment related links,info,pointers to articles/threads in case I missed out.
I hope this thread also helps others who have similar questions in future.


#2

Is your question whether what you do as a beginner has an impact on your long term achievements? The answer is obviously, undoubtedly, yes. As for how you achieve this long term goal, you need to know what it is, and where you are now in relation to this.


#3

[quote]xzr8 wrote:
I have a provoking doubt though,that is,the body structure/shape we will build or develop in the future,will it depend upon what workout type/split/routine/cycle and diet we follow today as a beginner,precisely. [/quote]
It’s hard to follow what you’re saying, but I think you’re talking about a beginner building a foundation and how that relates to their long term goal.

If that’s what you mean, then I’d say yes and no. It’s obviously important to follow a “good” program when you’re new to training. A lot of beginners waste time and energy by doing poorly-designed routines or not eating right. And that wasted time and energy is wasted “newbie gains” that are pretty much once in a lifetime. So a good program from Day One is the best approach.

But there are lots of “good” programs that will build a base of strength and size. Once you have that foundation in place and you have a better idea of what you’re capable of and where you want to go, you can take the next step towards your goal.

For example, if a 17-year old who’s 6 feet tall and 155 pounds says his long-term goal is to be a competitive bodybuilder, it wouldn’t be a bad idea for him to do Starting Strength as a beginner. In his condition, it doesn’t matter that Starting Strength doesn’t have exercises for biceps, calves, or side delts. After 3 or 4 months of following the program and eating right, he should end up overall bigger, stronger, and ready to move to a more complete program.


#4

A good strength base will set you up well for almost any physical goal.

For the record, my version of a good strength base is stolen straight from Dan John:

Body weight < Bench Press < Front Squat < Powerclean
Deadlift > 2X bodyweight.


#5

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

[quote]xzr8 wrote:
I have a provoking doubt though,that is,the body structure/shape we will build or develop in the future,will it depend upon what workout type/split/routine/cycle and diet we follow today as a beginner,precisely. [/quote]
It’s hard to follow what you’re saying, but I think you’re talking about a beginner building a foundation and how that relates to their long term goal.

If that’s what you mean, then I’d say yes and no. It’s obviously important to follow a “good” program when you’re new to training. A lot of beginners waste time and energy by doing poorly-designed routines or not eating right. And that wasted time and energy is wasted “newbie gains” that are pretty much once in a lifetime. So a good program from Day One is the best approach.

But there are lots of “good” programs that will build a base of strength and size. Once you have that foundation in place and you have a better idea of what you’re capable of and where you want to go, you can take the next step towards your goal.

For example, if a 17-year old who’s 6 feet tall and 155 pounds says his long-term goal is to be a competitive bodybuilder, it wouldn’t be a bad idea for him to do Starting Strength as a beginner. In his condition, it doesn’t matter that Starting Strength doesn’t have exercises for biceps, calves, or side delts. After 3 or 4 months of following the program and eating right, he should end up overall bigger, stronger, and ready to move to a more complete program.[/quote]

Thanks Chris,your answer was very helpful.
Sorry if the post was hard to follow,my doubt pretty much relate to the foundation workout.
I hope the image attached will help to understand my doubt more clearly.I have choosen the chest muscle for the example.

Apparently,the chest muscle developed are different from each other in dimensions.
Like the second one appears to be more triangular in shape,while the fourth one has more like a neat square shape unlike the last one which is a bit streched down and outwards.
Though all of them look muscular.

Basically,these people might have followed different workout routine/program when they were new to bodybuilding . Likewise the same idea applies to other body parts/muscle group too.
Whether the shape a person develops depend upon genetics,individual’s bodyframe,muscle’s tendency to adapt irrespective of what workout he followed as a beginner or one can transform from second to fourth ,vice-versa and so on…

Please help me interpret my doubt more elaborate if is miss something out ,so others can benefit from itand for future references.


#6

It was an old belief among bodybuilders that you could shape your muscles by doing different exercises, but as far as I know the consensus has shifted to where almost everyone accepts that the “shape” of your muscles and where they insert are genetic qualities that you can’t change. If you have triangular pecs, no amount of training is going to make them look like the pecs in the 3rd picture.


#7

[quote]TrevorLPT wrote:
It was an old belief among bodybuilders that you could shape your muscles by doing different exercises, but as far as I know the consensus has shifted to where almost everyone accepts that the “shape” of your muscles and where they insert are genetic qualities that you can’t change. If you have triangular pecs, no amount of training is going to make them look like the pecs in the 3rd picture. [/quote]

This


#8

[quote]xzr8 wrote:
Whether the shape a person develops depend upon genetics,individual’s bodyframe,muscle’s tendency to adapt irrespective of what workout he followed as a beginner or one can transform from second to fourth ,vice-versa and so on…[/quote]
Like Trevor said, genetic shape is going to be whatever it is. Specific training isn’t really a factor in the end result. You can build muscle and burn fat, but your muscles will end up looking however they’re “supposed to” look.


#9

[quote]dagill2 wrote:
For the record, my version of a good strength base is stolen straight from Dan John:

Body weight < Bench Press < Front Squat < Powerclean
Deadlift > 2X bodyweight.[/quote]

Power Clean more than you Front Squat? I will never be able to do that.


#10

[quote]craze9 wrote:

[quote]dagill2 wrote:
For the record, my version of a good strength base is stolen straight from Dan John:

Body weight < Bench Press < Front Squat < Powerclean
Deadlift > 2X bodyweight.[/quote]

Power Clean more than you Front Squat? I will never be able to do that. [/quote]

That’s meant to read “FS ~ Powerclean”. Not a problem for me, because my squat sucks donkey balls, but I can see how many people wouldn’t find this so easy.


#11

[quote]TrevorLPT wrote:
It was an old belief among bodybuilders that you could shape your muscles by doing different exercises, but as far as I know the consensus has shifted to where almost everyone accepts that the “shape” of your muscles and where they insert are genetic qualities that you can’t change. If you have triangular pecs, no amount of training is going to make them look like the pecs in the 3rd picture. [/quote]

Thanks TrevorLPT …Interesting …
I dug up more and found out that 85% bodybuilders tend to have the same ratio and proportion of their dimension, to be precise they have similar shapes (I’m not talking about minute details as the judges do,just overall appeal and appearance),whereas the aesthetic/fitness ones have their unique appeal.

Have you came across articles,threads,info similar to mine before(related to my doubt) ,if yes,please post the links/link.