T Nation

Design a Program for a Beginner


#60

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:
http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=congregate+with+lions[/quote]
Lolzers! What dorks. They spelled conjugate wrong.


#61

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:
http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=congregate+with+lions[/quote]

Holy fuck! Hahahahahaha


#62

I want to introduce a quote from his first thread.

[quote]T3hPwnisher wrote:

[quote]a2_z wrote:
If an athlete trains consistently in the sport he/plays the athlete will develop imbalances. The examples I proposed above are examples of what basketball players primarily need to utilize during the year because of the quad dominance the sport of basketball is. The result of never using corrective exercises will negatively effect the athletes’ posture, which in turn will decrease performance. The two exercises correct and strengthen what I believe to be the most vital muscles to exert and transfer energy from the ground to the top of your body.

Olympic lifts are also fantastic in the world of sports, because the fact that the exercises are “powerful” in nature, as opposed to power lifts which are more geared on max efforts.

I also love barbell rows.

I emphasize posterior chain exercises primarily in my workouts.
I do this because of how important these muscles are in forward propulsion. The biceps femoris, semitendinosus, and semimembranosus(hamstrings) are the muscle utilized most in the stretching of the leg during sprinting and the gluteus Maximus, minimus, and medius are the activated the most as your foot is in contact with the surface (exerting force) and as you are decelerating. The movement involved in sprinting, hip extension; the movement involved In deadlifting, hip extension. I would like to watch someone attempt to sprint without standing with perfect posture at top speed-- what does your body do at the top of a deadlift, ideally? Perfect posture. The resemblances between sprinting and deadlifting are more than most believe.
[/quote]

Well good luck with all that.[/quote]

I laughed out loud in my office.


#63

[quote]dt79 wrote:

[quote]nighthawkz wrote:
http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=congregate+with+lions[/quote]

Holy fuck! Hahahahahaha[/quote]

That right there makes this thread a winner…


#64

So are we now going with conjugate or congregate?


#65

[quote]dt79 wrote:
So are we now going with conjugate or congregate?[/quote]

Conjugate. Come on now. That makes it ten times funnier.


#66

From your “About Me” in your hub:

For loving to squat, I’m surprised your squat is only 185ish for 2. Actually, even in terms of bodyweight ratios, I’m pretty surprised where you’re at, relative to how much of an “expert” you consider yourself. I expected you to be closer to a 2x bodyweight squat and deadlift, and a 1.5x bodyweight bench press.

I genuinely think a good 6+ weeks of 3x weekly 20-rep squat workouts would do you good. Doesn’t matter what else you do on those days, as long as you get the squats in, and to at least parallel. Start with like 95, do 20 reps. Rest a day, then do 100x20. Then 105x20, etc. You don’t get to put the bar down until you hit all 20 reps.

I’d worked up to something like 210x20 within the first couple months of training, at around 145 bodyweight. You should be able to do at least that well, given that you already have something of an athletic base.


#67

Ok so:

  1. You’re a skinny bastard
  2. You want to prioritize strength
  3. Want the program to include lots of squats

Easy, you should do Westside for Skinny Bastards.


#68

[quote]flipcollar wrote:

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

[quote]flipcollar wrote:
In what sport is it a benefit for a 6’1 guy to weigh 145? I can’t think of any outside long distance running, or maybe some other track/field events.[/quote]
This kid is supposedly some kind of basketball prodigy, coaching athletes above his own level and walking on to a university team without ever playing high school ball.

But still, yeah, I wouldn’t call it a benefit to be frail.

[quote]a2_z wrote:
… I compete in sports that require that I stay lean[/quote]
No sport, outside of competitive bodybuilding, requires you to stay lean (and even then, it could be argued that it’s just about temporarily getting lean). Bodyfat may not be particularly useful or necessary, but there is totally such thing as being “too lean” in almost every sport. And certainly no sports, other than jockeying like Steez said or some weight class-specific sports, require you to be as underweight as you currently are and have been.

A “pretty good” basketball player who’s 6’1" and 140 pounds will be an even better basketball player when he’s 6’1" and 190 pounds, as long as he builds that increased strength and muscle intelligently with a good plan.[/quote]

UNREAL. I hope this kid understands that there is not a single player in the NBA who weighs less than 150 lbs. I’ve met a number of pros in person, and they are so much bigger (thicker/heavier) than I think most people would assume. I remember seeing Jason Kidd a few years ago and thinking how I’d love to have arms his size. Dude looked like a monster in street clothes. Chauncy Billups is another guy I saw who totally looked jacked. Those are guys who aren’t much over 6 feet, and both have to be over 200 lbs. [/quote]
Most guards in the league average around 185-190. Kobe, at 6’6" is only 215

Edit: just looked them both up, they’re listed at about 210lbs. Which is HUGE for a point guard.


#69

I consummate with ligers. They have the most magic


#70

After 2 almost sleepless night with a newborn, this thread was just what I needed before I go to do my workout. Some hilarious posts there and there.

I think that the existence of this thread already tells us the problem. There is prob. +100 strength templates/programs for beginners with a focus on squats. Most of them work, just pick one which seems appreciated (5x5, SS etc.)


#71

[quote]Rattus wrote:
I think that the existence of this thread already tells us the problem. There is prob. +100 strength templates/programs for beginners with a focus on squats. Most of them work, just pick one which seems appreciated (5x5, SS etc.)
[/quote]

All kidding aside, I think this is a key point. OP is looking for something that is really quite simple to find. If you merely type “beginner weightlifting squat three days a week” into Google, StrongLifts is the first hit. If you put forth ANY effort at all, you could also find Starting Strength, and if you search the archives of this site, a few other templates for high-frequency squatting. So I’m a little puzzled why OP even had to ask about something that would have taken 30 seconds to find via Google, or maybe 30 minutes to “research” a few different ones.

But hey. Don’t be a sheep. Conjugate with lions.


#72

[quote]Reed wrote:
Hey my name is so and so and I have no idea how to use google or do any research at all. So would you please just spend your time for free mind you to write a program specifically for me so I don’t have TO DO ANYTHING… Oh and I REALLY LIKE SQUATTING.

Thats what I reed.[/quote]

Fixed :slight_smile:

OP I am a beginner too and this is what I am doing:

A
Squat 3x5
Bench 3x5
Weighted chin-up 3x5

B
Deadlift 1x5
Press 3x5
Weighted chin-up 3x5

C
Squat 3x5
Bench 3x5
Weighted chin-up 3x5

If you have really done your homework and read through Starting strength, 5/3/1, researched stronglifts and OTSSS and still don’t like any of those routines why not just use common sense and put together a simple routine based on linear progression with a few basic compound lifts?

In life struggling to achieve something is what makes you knowledgable about a subject. You can’t read about being a small business owner, you have to try it. You can’t read yourself into being a good athlete you have to try things and based on how they work keep or discard them.

People are helpful and offer great advice on this forum but when you have the attitude that you can do no research and simply tell people to think and plan for you, it can rub people the wrong way.

Good luck OP hope you get good results.


#73

[quote]YamatoDamashii92 wrote:

[quote]Reed wrote:
Hey my name is so and so and I have no idea how to use google or do any research at all. So would you please just spend your time for free mind you to write a program specifically for me so I don’t have TO DO ANYTHING… Oh and I REALLY LIKE SQUATTING.

Thats what I reed.[/quote]

Fixed :slight_smile:

OP I am a beginner too and this is what I am doing:

A
Squat 3x5
Bench 3x5
Weighted chin-up 3x5

B
Deadlift 1x5
Press 3x5
Weighted chin-up 3x5

C
Squat 3x5
Bench 3x5
Weighted chin-up 3x5

If you have really done your homework and read through Starting strength, 5/3/1, researched stronglifts and OTSSS and still don’t like any of those routines why not just use common sense and put together a simple routine based on linear progression with a few basic compound lifts?

In life struggling to achieve something is what makes you knowledgable about a subject. You can’t read about being a small business owner, you have to try it. You can’t read yourself into being a good athlete you have to try things and based on how they work keep or discard them.

People are helpful and offer great advice on this forum but when you have the attitude that you can do no research and simply tell people to think and plan for you, it can rub people the wrong way.

Good luck OP hope you get good results.[/quote]

Lol that made me giggle


#74

  1. You can’t be serious with that “Frank Zane” pose?

  2. I remember when Chris did the great burn of 2014 on you, I was there. You remember when you said you coached high school while in high school but were not on the team.

  3. You thought deadlifts and presses were the only two movements you needed. You were a smug and wouldn’t take advice on that too.

  4. FYI Ive trained some pro basketball players. They don’t squat much, or do deadlifts or do presses that much (Ive never trained a professional athletes that doesn’t have messed up shoulders of some kind so we don’t typically do heavy presses with them). We target a lot of mobility work, lateral explosion, mechanics. That said they still squat more than you and higher reps.

We only do normal gym training 2 times a week with them. We only do maybe two big movements a week. The rest would be accessories, bodyweight movements. Other days are explosive, activation, jump mechanics, something else but lifting. Most of these guys are huge with ankle, knee and hamstring issues. So lifting heavy sometimes has a to take a backseat.

  1. Your wing span isn’t that big, quit making excuses.

  2. I was a lot like you, minus the attitude, for a little while. I went the exact opposite approach though and talked to everyone I knew that was stronger, bigger, faster, had bigger arms than me. Almost none of it worked because i trained with a different theory weekly. I did make some gains but that was more because I was consisted in the gym working out.

My advice stick with any program for 12 weeks, don’t do anymore posting here until the program runs through. Every single post of your seem to post about a different theory or workout. Do a program in its entirety.


#75

Oh fuck… that zane pose… the jeans from the kid’s section…I’m dying…wahahahahaha omg this thread…


#76

[quote]a2_z wrote:
Thank you everyone for your advice and criticism. I’d like to add I have a 6’5" wingspan, a disadvantage to most of my pressing. Check my profile, I have decent body weight to strength ratios. I’m not strongest athlete to any extent, but I pour a lot of my focus into the integrity of my body. I have excellent posture and I focus on form a lot more than max attempts.

I’ve been the type of kid that prioritizes the essential over the nonsense. I understood at the beginning of my strength training career that excellent athletes had excellent posture. I also noticed that the strongest men in the world squat and deadlift. I wanted to have solid foundation to build upon; I did not want to have to back track and develop and reconstruct my body.

That being said I have the tendency to emphasize specific lifts for three to four weeks and rotate the exercises. Last cycle, I trained box squatting three to four times per week for three weeks. I usually begin to experience overtraining or mental burnout within this time and switch exercises. I am now utilizing the front squat. I’ve front squatted five different sessions within the last eight days.

Alternating heavy and light days. I attempt to add weight to each session, light and heavy. I’m impatient to an extent and if I desire to improve at something, I usually attack it wholeheartedly. I also like to add, I don’t take offense to anything, I enjoy criticism. I always ask my friends for criticism; I tell my friends to hold nothing back, because you cannot hurt my confidence.

I’ve poured too much time into my athletic abilities to allow criticism to affect me negatively. I do take offense if someone insults my intelligence. The reason is, I’ve had not one person mentor me, not one person throughout my basketball and strength career. I have developed my self. I have one year experience. I have achieved little, but I have earned every single achievement I have.

You can be a “online bragger,” or accuse me of such, but people that know who I am, respect me. On top of that, I respect everyone’s opinion, but I am not on here to argue with boys. I might be only 20 years old; however, I only travel and conjugate with the lions, I’m not a sheep. I’m not typing this to sound “hard” or whatever. I want this forum to understand who I am as a man. I love this site, I’ve read hundreds of articles. I’m not perfect. I like listening and learning how other athletes train. Once again, thank you.[/quote]

If you think you’ll have any real success as a player at that weight, you’re sorely mistaken. Even if you’re the fastest, dirtiest, most skilled player on the court, you’re going to get pushed and knocked around by guys who are REALLY athletic (read, guys who can out jump, run, squat, press, and shoot you, all at a weight about 30-50lbs higher).

You aren’t experiencing overtraining. You have to train at crazy intensities for a long time for this to happen. And switching exercises doesn’t fix the problem. Resting for a couple weeks or more fixes the problem. What you’re actually experiencing is undereating and therefore a lack of recovery because of a lack of food.


#77

OP play me 1v1 in ball. I swear on my mum I’ll wreck you.


#78

Is srs?


#79

Delusions of grandeur. That’s all this thread was.