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Depth Jump Question

First off I’ll give my stats.
Age: 21
Weight: 180
Squat: 290
Deadlift: 330
Vert: 27’’
I am currently doing CT’s “get stronger, get faster, get vertical” program.

My question is when I do depth jumps, I’ve heard that a person is suppose to try to keep the time on the ground as little as possible, but if I do that, I do not get up as high. Should I concentrate on getting as high as possible or keeping the time on the ground down?

I feel like I’m muscling my jump rather then bouncing up. Should I use a height that is equal to my vertical jump, a height that allows me to stay on the ground as short as possible and still get up high as I can, or a height that where I can jump my highest even if I am muscling the jump?

I’m definitely no expert on this, as I’ve only done like two of these in my life. But it’s my understanding that you’re supposed to concentrate on a little bit of both. It’s supposed to be a concentration on a super dynamic, springy type of muscle contraction. More minimal ground time I would think, but still trying to hit your mark. Talking out of my ass though. Take it how it is

[quote]DjSm28 wrote:

My question is when I do depth jumps, I’ve heard that a person is suppose to try to keep the time on the ground as little as possible, but if I do that, I do not get up as high. Should I concentrate on getting as high as possible or keeping the time on the ground down?
[/quote]

The focus is on reducing the time on the ground. Choose a box height that lets you “bounce” off the ground. Keep ground contact for as little time as possible. You can slowly increase the box heigh as you improve.

You DO NOT want a box height that is equal to your vertical jump height.

This is a strenuous exercise. Dont do to many.

[quote]DjSm28 wrote:
First off I’ll give my stats.
Age: 21
Weight: 180
Squat: 290
Deadlift: 330
Vert: 27’’
I am currently doing CT’s “get stronger, get faster, get vertical” program.

My question is when I do depth jumps, I’ve heard that a person is suppose to try to keep the time on the ground as little as possible, but if I do that, I do not get up as high. Should I concentrate on getting as high as possible or keeping the time on the ground down?

I feel like I’m muscling my jump rather then bouncing up. Should I use a height that is equal to my vertical jump, a height that allows me to stay on the ground as short as possible and still get up high as I can, or a height that where I can jump my highest even if I am muscling the jump?[/quote]

Sounds like you lack movement efficiency. meaning that you have trouble quickly transfering strength and power into the ground quickly. Its like a muscle car driving on flat tires and easily fixed. add a couple of easy “quick foot” drills in to your warm up.

example: jump back and forth over a line for 10 secs. you can do these front to back, side to side, one leg, etc.

I would drop the depth jumps for awhile until you bring up basic movement efficiency. you can do easy drills like this daily.

Check out Kelly Baggett’s site for more information.

Depth jumps are not the same as box jumps. According to Kelly Bagget you should be about 1.5 times your vertical so about 40 inches off the ground and try to land 40 inches away from the box while minimizing the time spent on the ground.

A few tips:

– step off the box (don’t jump off it)

– when your feet touch the ground, the knees should already be bent; in a normal jump, you descend rapidly then reverse direction to use the stretch-reflex; in a depth jump, you land at the descended position so that you don’t need to reverse direction; the force of the legs hitting the ground triggers the stretch-reflex action for you

– if your heels touch the ground and your weight actually shifts to them, the box is too high; lower it until this does not happen

– it doesn’t take a very high box or a lot of volume to get the desired effect from this exercise; don’t overdo either

– do plyometrics when your legs are fresh

[quote]biggun7997 wrote:
Depth jumps are not the same as box jumps. According to Kelly Bagget you should be about 1.5 times your vertical so about 40 inches off the ground and try to land 40 inches away from the box while minimizing the time spent on the ground. [/quote]

Kelly has never stated that altitude landings should be from 1.5 times one’s CMJ (countermovement jump), especially when just being introduced to the training means. The general recommendation for this type of training is to start at 1.1 times one’s best CMJ. If you start from 1.5 times you won’t have the strength to absorb the impact forces.

In the article CT has the box at being 50cm for weeks 1-3 and 70cm for weeks 4-6

use those numbers. I was similar to you as far as being not very reactive and I was able to gain around 2-3 inches on my vert in the 6 weeks of doing this program.