T Nation

Deload as Rest Days


#1

I've been trying to add a bit more frequency to my lifting but found 2 on 1 off just seems to work best. I thought about adding deload days in-between, this would just be something simple that takes 10-15 minutes. I primarily workout at home so I wouldn't need to waste a trip to the gym. I use a 3 day split so my deload day could be whatever lift is not the previous or next day. An example might be bodyweight squats holding some plates and deadlift up to 225lbs, focusing on form for both.

Has anyone found a positive benefit to this or is just a waste of time? I've done this occasionally for various reasons but never planned it out long term.


General Physical Preparation-Style Rest Day?
#2

That sounds more like a feeder workout than a deload. I've found it a good way to recover from soreness and add some overall volume.


#3

^

Yeah, what he said. I've had my fastest results when I do this. The key to success for me personally, was gradually adding in volume. Like start with one feeder, then when I'm able to get to 30 minutes and increase the intensity without it hurting my main days, take some of the volume from that feeder to make another one. Rinse and repeat.


#4

Fletch got me up to speed on this last year.

At first, the "extra workouts" should be geared for recovery. Whatever you can do to set up for a better real workout. Anything that hurts, or takes a little extra work to get loose and warmed up in the gym, hit it at home.

Easy goodmornings with a band to get the blood flowing the day after squatting. Or if you're more messed up, you can do all that rehab junk. Peterson Step Ups for the trick knee, or clam shells for shitty glutes.

Then you can do all that stuff you "should be doing." Band pull-aparts, fire-hydrants and dead bugs. 100 extra band pushdowns and a couple jumps. Whatever "You Should Be Able To Do This Challenge" tip you read recently.

Start easy. Make sure whatever you do doesn't impact "real" workouts. Then just keep adding a little at a time. Gradually pick more challenging exercises, and drop the easiest stuff.


#5

Like Pwnisher said, sounds like you're talking more about a feeder workout or active recovery, not really a deload. "Deloads" are generally longer, like a full week or more, done instead of your "regular" lifting routine entirely.

Tons of articles talk about the benefits of active recovery. Basically doing something on non-lifting days instead of zero activity or movement. Active recovery is more general (yoga, walking, mobility drills, bodyweight exercise, sled work that isn't brutally intense.). Feeder workouts are usually more directly related to your current training program.

Thibaudeau discussed one way to structure feeder workouts, basically repeating a movement pattern/muscle group from the previous day with lighter work.


#6

On gym Days...

Some push ups or dumbbell benches during lower body warm-up time.

Some back raises or walking lunges during upper body warm up time.