T Nation

Deep Tissue Massage

I plan on getting one soon, first one. are they as good as people say? what did you guys experience?

General consensus is that tissue quality should take precedence over joint ROM. The goal of deep tissue will be to locate adhesions within the muscle and break them down, improving tissue quality through better alignment of connective tissue.

Consequently at times it will hurt like fuck. But a good therapist will manage this and make sure you leave feeling a lot better than when you go in.

Wow, much better answer than i expected. i wouldve settled with a “they’re awesome!!!1”

thanks

Just make sure to tell them to apply as much pressure as they need to. Most of time they are working on people that are in there just for relaxation and are taking it easy on them. If they’re doing it right you won’t be relaxing much.

If you’ve never had one, I would get a full hour to make sure they are getting at everything they need to. If you’re not in pain the whole time you can cut it down next time. I drive about 1000 miles a week so I always need the full hour.

If you do need to cut it down, make sure they spend most of time on your back and legs. Skip the feet, chest, and arms.

Don’t skip the chest. Ever. Especially if your upper back is bothering you.

When it comes to pain, the one thing I tell my clients is that crossing the line between ‘Hurts so good’ and ‘Please make it stop’ is a no-no.

[quote]dhickey wrote:
Just make sure to tell them to apply as much pressure as they need to. Most of time they are working on people that are in there just for relaxation and are taking it easy on them. If they’re doing it right you won’t be relaxing much.

If you’ve never had one, I would get a full hour to make sure they are getting at everything they need to. If you’re not in pain the whole time you can cut it down next time. I drive about 1000 miles a week so I always need the full hour. If you do need to cut it down, make sure they spend most of time on your back and legs. Skip the feet, chest, and arms.[/quote]

thanks, i’ll keep all that in mind. how much am i looking at spending for a full hour, or does it vary greatly?

[quote]kellerdp wrote:
Don’t skip the chest. Ever. Especially if your upper back is bothering you.

When it comes to pain, the one thing I tell my clients is that crossing the line between ‘Hurts so good’ and ‘Please make it stop’ is a no-no. [/quote]

ok, keep the chest, and no REAL pain. got it

I love it, I see my Osteopath and get a full work over once a month.

They’re awesome!!!1

[quote]Eielson wrote:
they’re awesome!!!1[/quote]

that’s all i needed to know, thanks E

Dont plan on only having them once. Get them on a regular basis if you want any real results.

[quote]PlayoffsOrBust wrote:
kellerdp wrote:
Don’t skip the chest. Ever. Especially if your upper back is bothering you.

When it comes to pain, the one thing I tell my clients is that crossing the line between ‘Hurts so good’ and ‘Please make it stop’ is a no-no.

ok, keep the chest, and no REAL pain. got it[/quote]

Gosh so true. I had pretty severe muscle bruising on my back (I didn’t know this at the time) and had deep tissue work on it. Idioticly, I was in almost tearjerking pain yet didn’t say anything nor stopped it, and when I stood up (barely) I couldn’t bend my back at all. Don’t make this mistake!

If you can afford them, a bi weekly or weekly appt will be good.
Ibtwn SMFR with the foamroller and tennis ball would help them with their work.

im going to disagree about the pain. Everyone has a different pain tolerance, so judging a physiological and physical response based on individual pain tolerance in absurd. Also I find that the deeper and more painful the massage is (assuming there is already a problem in the area) the more effective it is.

[quote]getfast24 wrote:
im going to disagree about the pain. Everyone has a different pain tolerance, so judging a physiological and physical response based on individual pain tolerance in absurd.[/quote]That’s why I rely on verbal cues from my clients. If I know an area is going to be tender (intercostals, psoas, subscap to name a few), I will warn them ahead of time to expect a bit of pain.

As for the cost, you will be looking at anywhere between $40 (if you go to a place like Massage Envy) and $85 for an hour.

If the price is too much, I’d recommend trying to find a massage school in the area and see if they have any licensed therapists who do overflow massage. They usually have the certifications you are looking for.

As for certifications, I’d recommend trying to find someone who knows at least Myofascial Release techniques, Trigger Point Therapy and is certified in Deep Tissue. Never be afraid to ask how many hours of education they have in a specific modality.

[quote]PlayoffsOrBust wrote:
Eielson wrote:
they’re awesome!!!1

that’s all i needed to know, thanks E[/quote]

Anytime.

[quote]Hooker#1 wrote:
Consequently at times it will hurt like fuck. But a good therapist will manage this and make sure you leave feeling a lot better than when you go in. [/quote]

I’ve never found that to be the case, although the next day you should definitely feel better.

Depends on the problem, but after (and sometimes during) a good massage I usually feel like a hurl.

I get one at least once a month. I’d go more, but I don’t want to spend the money. It’s one of the best recovery things I’ve done, if the therapist knows what they are doing (and has strong enough hands). I always ask for the strongest girl they have, and tell her to whoop my ass. I squirm and sweat bullets the whole time, but it really fixes all those tight spots, usually the next day.

No one actually mentioned ART but since most ART practioners are also DC’s they will be able to manage both your structural alignment as well as your soft tissue for the best of both worlds.

X2 on definitly getting the chest done(and front delts).

To get the most out of it stretch the muscles that were worked immediatly after the session, and periodically do short 20 sec stretches througout the next day.

C