T Nation

Deep Squats Gave Me a Hernia?

Hi guys.

Does the deep squat increase the risk of getting an Umbilical Hernia?

If been training for many years and Ive had a number of years doing powerlifting exercises so it seems strange that its happened now. When Ive analysed my training the only thing that’s was new in my routine was deep squats. I recall reading about squating and deadlifting increases you stomach strength so I did cut back on direct ab work, could this also be the problem

Many of my friend are now worrying that their new training maybe putting them at risk of this

You help is appreciated

I never trained abs regular, never needed to, my abs were blocky so just did em every 3 months or so.

Then i began going deep deep on my squats, and i noticed a little soft lump one day, as i was fucking my girlfriend of the time.

It was from 400kg leg presses followed by deep sumo squats with not enough “core” (*puke) work.
It is an Abdominal hernia, and it is still not fixed… don’t hurt, but i keep pushing it in incase it strangulates and poisons me once and for all. Especially have to when i shit, just for a picture for you all…

Joe

You can get a hernia from straining too hard on the toilet, make sure your friends keep eating fiber.

And yeah, squats, and any lifts that utilize your core can cause a hernia.

In a lot of cases hernias are caused by wear and tear of a pre existing ‘dent’ in the ab wall. It may not even matter how strong your abs are. In fact, ab work may make this worse. This dent is likely to be congenital, so if and when it tears, there’s not much you can do about it except having the surgery.

I suggest you do your research on google to get yourself informed.

[quote]Cyke wrote:
You can get a hernia from straining too hard on the toilet, make sure your friends keep eating fiber.

And yeah, squats, and any lifts that utilize your core can cause a hernia.

In a lot of cases hernias are caused by wear and tear of a pre existing ‘dent’ in the ab wall. It may not even matter how strong your abs are. In fact, ab work may make this worse. This dent is likely to be congenital, so if and when it tears, there’s not much you can do about it except having the surgery.

I suggest you do your research on google to get yourself informed.
[/quote]

You seem to know what you’re talking about… I had a right inguinal hernia was I was 17 (I’m now 40) and had it repaired at the time. They didn’t have the “mesh” technology back then, just sewed it up. So, seems like a recurrence would have been likely, and sure enough when I was 38 (2 years ago) it showed up again. Same hernia, same location. Just ripped through the original repair, I guess…

What’s interesting is that I was experimenting with some weight-lifting at the time and this may have been a factor. But also notable is that I’d actually been in the emergency room a couple or a few times during the year or two prior with extreme abdominal cramps. Turned out I was getting constipated to the point of bowel obstruction. Very serious!! Now I take a fiber supplement every day and really watch it… Maybe take a laxative once a month if needed… Just gotta keep things moving!

You also mention the hernia thing being “congenital”. This really seems to be true, based on my research and my experience. In my case, I’m an identical twin, which means that I was essentially a “preemie” at birth (5.5 pounds; my twin was only 4.5). I think the groin muscles are the last to “get sewn together” in the womb, so I wonder if my groin just was naturally weak (i.e., underdeveloped) at birth…

A little scary: I just started the Rippetoe program about a week ago, which includes squats, deadlifts and bent-over rows. I’ve never done any of these before, and one reason is that I’ve been nervous about the hernia. However, I did get the mesh repair two years ago, so I SHOULD be safe, as long as I keep my weights reasonable and really pay attention to form, etc. I’m also constantly conscientious about my groin: Any sign of pain at all and I back way off… Hopefully, everything will be cool…

But the main point is: Hernias may be sort of “built in” to a person’s system and hence a little on the inevitable side for those of us who are born with a weak spot… Weightlifting, constipation, a random coughing fit, or just a nasty sneeze might be all it takes to pop the little guy out!

I think you have to have the genetic predisposition plus heavy exercise and a weak core will all add up to hernia.
Just look at mine in my profile pics.

I had mine fixed in Sept with mesh and screws. Sucked. It’s taken me a long time to bounce back. My abs still don’t want to fire correctly and often spasm where the instruments were “shoved-in”.
If you have it fixed, definately have the “tension-free” arthroscopic repair done.

hi mate, looked at your profile, cant see any hernia pics.

Im going to this hospital

http://www.hernia.org/

i understand that this is the most advanced repair

[quote]Radjxf wrote:
I think you have to have the genetic predisposition plus heavy exercise and a weak core will all add up to hernia.
Just look at mine in my profile pics.

speakman wrote:
I think the groin muscles are the last to “get sewn together” in the womb, so I wonder if my groin just was naturally weak (i.e., underdeveloped) at birth…
[/quote]

It’s not genetic, it’s congenital. For inguinal hernias, before birth, we have a small opening in the ab wall for the testicles to descend into the scrotum. Sometimes this just doesnt close up properly.

But you’re right, it is a combination of this defect and heavy lifting.

Based on whatever research I’ve done, I think that it’s not a question of a weak core. Because if the ‘dent’ is already there, working your core is not going to heal the abdominal wall, it will just accelerate the tearing process.

Along the same lines, I don’t think that bad form has anything to do with it. I hear this a lot, but I just don’t see any reasoning to support it. In fact, I have always felt that bad form on some exercises can take stress off the abdomen instead, and bad form on other exercises will stress it more.

Hmmm quick question for you guys.

When I was born I was born with a double hernia. I assume I have no cool mesh in me or anything.

Since this was repaired within days of me being born to you think I will have any additional risk of this happening again?

I’m thinking that since it was fixed within days of being born when I was growing it may have repaired the dent itself.

Sorry for the hyjack! I just never thought about it before.

[quote]Radjxf wrote:
I had mine fixed in Sept with mesh and screws. Sucked. It’s taken me a long time to bounce back. My abs still don’t want to fire correctly and often spasm where the instruments were “shoved-in”.
If you have it fixed, definately have the “tension-free” arthroscopic repair done.[/quote]

Not sure what you mean by “screws”… Is that typical with the mesh procedure? Maybe I’ve got some hardware in there that I didn’t know about… Hope I don’t set off any airport metal detectors!!

Much more importantly, I’m curious about your comment, “It’s taken me a long time to bounce back.” How do you define this? Are you now back to a full workout routine, heavy weights, etc.? I was so nervous about recurrence (still a concern) that I was OVERLY cautious at the gym for at least a full year following the procedure. Recently, I started Rippetoe’s program, and am now doing squats, deadlifts and bent-over rows, all of which I’d never even tried before… With a 5% chance of recurrence (according to my doctor), really, really nervous about progressively adding weight to these exercises… I’ll do it, but I’m nervous about it!

Oh, to add to the nervousness: If a recurrence does take place and I have to get repaired again, then the chance of an additional recurrence becomes about 30%. That would pretty much put any of us out of the gym!

Really curious as to everyone’s thoughts on these points… Love to weight train, and would hate to get knocked out of the game for good!!!

i think i need a powerlifting belt , thick at the front