T Nation

Decline Press

I find that Decline press, and Incline press never leave me with any shoulder pain. I dont know why, but there is something to do with being at an angle. either up or down. When I bench I tend to get internal shoulder soreness, especially when unracking myself with no spotter. I can un rack weights with no pain ever on incline, and decline but not on bench.

Anyway, how easy is decline for you , sometimes it feels like a parlor trick cause you can put so much weight on. Luckily my lower chest is a weakpoint.
What is your guys numbers on bench, compared to incline and decline?
just curious?

Had the same problem once too.
Do you remember to arch your back? Then it basically becomes a slight decline.

arching my back involves more muscles than I really want to involve. I like to involve the motor unit that im working only. unless im doing powercleans.

[quote]MISCONCEPTION wrote:
arching my back involves more muscles than I really want to involve. I like to involve the motor unit that im working only. unless im doing powercleans.[/quote]

Arch your back and unless its really light weight, always use a spotter for unracking.

[quote]MISCONCEPTION wrote:
I find that Decline press, and Incline press never leave me with any shoulder pain. I dont know why, but there is something to do with being at an angle. either up or down. When I bench I tend to get internal shoulder soreness, especially when unracking myself with no spotter. I can un rack weights with no pain ever on incline, and decline but not on bench.
[/quote]

Many people, such as Dante Trudell, Dorian Yates and Dr Fred Hatfield [Dr Squat], advice against flat barbell bench pressing and using incline or decline variations instead for non-powerlifters. Both for the damage done to the shoulders and the greater risk of a pec tear. So you’re not alone in these thoughts.

Hey bro this caught my attention.

Myself:
Flat Bench BBell - rep with 225-245
Incline Rep with 205-215
Decline Rep with 225-245

Pretty close to even for me really.
I would strongly suggest anyone benching more than 225 to
A. Always have a lift off, I am guilty of not doing this too.
B. Include Rotator Exercises to build up some strength in those smaller less flexible muscles controlling your cuff.
This will help protect your shoulders and increase your max.

Thanks and Good Luck

For some reason it’s the opposite with me. Decline bench messes with my left shoulder and flat bench has never been a problem. A little odd…

Incline messes with my shoulder. I don’t have a problem with flat or decline.

I have a client who has this problem. She has a torn labrum and any flat pressing bothers her quite a bit. She can overhead, incline, or decline press without any problems at all.

[quote]Randizo wrote:
Hey bro this caught my attention.

Myself:
Flat Bench BBell - rep with 225-245
Incline Rep with 205-215
Decline Rep with 225-245

Pretty close to even for me really.
I would strongly suggest anyone benching more than 225 to
A. Always have a lift off, I am guilty of not doing this too.
B. Include Rotator Exercises to build up some strength in those smaller less flexible muscles controlling your cuff.
This will help protect your shoulders and increase your max.

Thanks and Good Luck[/quote]

I train alone at home and my bench only goes from 0-90 degree incline, what would you suggest? Only recently Ive actually began to feel my chest in the flat bench 'cause I’m taking a wider grip.

Incline and decline movements fully hit the chest. Unless training for competition that requires it I don’t even see a purpose in flat presses.

[quote]Qaash wrote:
I train alone at home and my bench only goes from 0-90 degree incline, what would you suggest? Only recently Ive actually began to feel my chest in the flat bench 'cause I’m taking a wider grip.[/quote]

Qaash-
I would suggest placing a 45 pound plate under the front leg of your bench. This will create a decline. Use multiple plates if necessary but make sure it is wide enough to create stability under the front part of the bench that comes down to touch the floor. By elevating the front you create a natural decline slope. Just make sure it is stable so that you do not create an injury risk.

Never had problems with flat benching… however, i think its due to my strength levels on the exercise… i plan on not flat benching above 350 lbs, unless that when i get there i see that i can do 400 with no issues.

I never do flat bench either. Feels like it’s mostly on my shoulders and no chest. I can lift way more on decline.