T Nation

Death of Alexander Litvinenko

http://www.mosnews.com/news/2006/11/25/probelitvinenko.shtml

http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/europe/11/24/uk.spy.statement/index.html

Former Russian FSB agent, Died Nov. 23, after being ruthlessly poisoned with Polonium-210.

Somehow that is at least slightly amusing…

I mean governments kill people all the time, but poisoning them with radioactive isotopes is just too JamesBondian…

A car crash was not good enough?

Snobs…

Don’t forget “they” tried to poison Viktor Yushchenko using dioxin. He’s all disfigured now.

Using polonium seems to guarantee the result. Dioxin is so undependable.

[quote]pookie wrote:
Don’t forget “they” tried to poison Viktor Yushchenko using dioxin. He’s all disfigured now.

Using polonium seems to guarantee the result. Dioxin is so undependable.
[/quote]

They succeeded in killing Georgi Markov with a ricin poisoned dart from an umbrella in 1978. Very James Bond.

http://www.cnn.com/2003/WORLD/europe/01/07/terror.poison.bulgarian/

Yup. Those KGB (or FSB, or whatever they’re called now) agents sure take their spy craft seriously.

I wonder if Putin has a big leather chair and an angora cat he likes to pet.

Litvinenko was careless, he had become way to comfortable( intention of the KGB Im sure), and he should have known that they were watching him, after all isnt it protocol to “expect the unexpected”. I would also say that if he had been trained that well he would have been eating his own food, and not something that had to be “made” for him.

[quote]Loose Tool wrote:
pookie wrote:
Don’t forget “they” tried to poison Viktor Yushchenko using dioxin. He’s all disfigured now.

Using polonium seems to guarantee the result. Dioxin is so undependable.

They succeeded in killing Georgi Markov with a ricin poisoned dart from an umbrella in 1978. Very James Bond.

http://www.cnn.com/2003/WORLD/europe/01/07/terror.poison.bulgarian/

[/quote]

That was 30 years ago. Imagine what they are capable of now. Nanotechnology used to disperse poison through the blood stream up to years after injected into the individual doesn’t seem so far off.

[quote]orion wrote:
Somehow that is at least slightly amusing…

I mean governments kill people all the time, but poisoning them with radioactive isotopes is just too JamesBondian…

A car crash was not good enough?

Snobs…[/quote]

Yeah. Seems like some Russian Spy, Intrigue movie.

[quote]orion wrote:
A car crash was not good enough?

Snobs…[/quote]

I think the reason is that a car crash could be interpreted as being an accident.

When you die of polonium poisoning, there’s very little doubt left that you’ve been deliberately targeted and killed.

Sends a message to any other dissidents that keeping their mouths shut can prolong their days.

Wasn’t Putin, was moose and squirrel.

[quote]pookie wrote:

Sends a message to any other dissidents that keeping their mouths shut can prolong their days.

[/quote]

I think that was the entire point, coming so soon after Anna Politkovskaya’s murder.

Remember when Bush looked into Putin’s eyes and saw the soul of a good man?

Oops.

The real reason of his poisoning is that he knew dirt on Putin’s taste for young chldren and on Putin’s rise to the presidency through terrorism by his FSB and then blamed on Chechnya.

http://www.mosnews.com/news/2006/11/24/lastwords.shtml

In his last interview the poisoned former Russian security agent Alexander Litvinenko said that the hit on him had been ordered from the Kremlin, The Times daily reported on Friday.

?I want to survive, just to show them,? Alexander Litvinenko said in an exclusive interview given just hours before he died.

The former Russian security officer suggested that he knew he may not win his struggle against the lethal chemicals destroying his vital organs. But he said the campaign for truth would go on with or without him.

?The bastards got me,? he whispered. ?But they won?t get everybody.?

Mr Litvinenko, 43, uttered his last defiant words to Andrei Nekrasov, a friend and film-maker, who had visited him in University College Hospital in London every day this week.

Although Mr Nekrasov had seen Mr Litvinenko sometimes more than once a day, Tuesday was the last occasion on which his friend could communicate properly. Yet in his final remarks, the former spy remained defiant in his battle against President Putin and the Russian security services.

He also managed a joke at his own expense, suggesting that his poisoning was proof that his campaign against the Kremlin had targeted the right people. ?This is what it takes to prove one has been telling the truth,? he said.

He was referring to allegations he made in a book, The FSB Blows up Russia, which accuses the Russian security services of causing a series of apartment block explosions in Moscow in 1999 that helped to propel Vladimir Putin into the presidency.

It was just last month that Anna Politkovskaya was murdered as well – two years before that she was poisoned.

Russian Journalist Anna Politkovskaya Murdered
Russia Labeled As ‘Uniquely Hostile’ Place For Journalists
Oct. 8, 2006

Anna Politkovskaya: Poisoned by Putin
September 9, 2004
The nurse tells me that when they brought me in I was “almost hopeless”. Then she whispers: “My dear, they tried to poison you.” All the tests taken at the airport have been destroyed - on orders “from on high”, say the doctors.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/comment/story/0,,1300193,00.html

In the US they just shoot them twice in the head and rule it suicide
http://www.prisonplanet.com/articles/december2004/141204webbmurdered.htm

I’m so fascinated by the story of Mr. Litvinenko’s death. It’s like real life James Bond. The news is saying they believe it was in the sushi bar that he ingested the Polonium.

[quote]Professor X wrote:
Loose Tool wrote:
pookie wrote:
Don’t forget “they” tried to poison Viktor Yushchenko using dioxin. He’s all disfigured now.

Using polonium seems to guarantee the result. Dioxin is so undependable.

They succeeded in killing Georgi Markov with a ricin poisoned dart from an umbrella in 1978. Very James Bond.

http://www.cnn.com/2003/WORLD/europe/01/07/terror.poison.bulgarian/

That was 30 years ago. Imagine what they are capable of now. Nanotechnology used to disperse poison through the blood stream up to years after injected into the individual doesn’t seem so far off. [/quote]

Note to self, dont let X give me novocaine.

Are there not less detectable and quicker acting poisons? Maybe I’ve seen one too many Bond movies.

It’s just odd they target this guy so publically, with such a high profile poison. Was the guy such a threat to Putin? To risk alienation from western powers?

Even if Putin is slouching towards a total iron fisted policy, it seems odd he would have this guy rubbed out, in this way.

[quote]Sloth wrote:
Are there not less detectable and quicker acting poisons? Maybe I’ve seen one too many Bond movies.

It’s just odd they target this guy so publically, with such a high profile poison. Was the guy such a threat to Putin? To risk alienation from western powers?

Even if Putin is slouching towards a total iron fisted policy, it seems odd he would have this guy rubbed out, in this way.[/quote]

I think the whole idea is to leave little doubt of who did the killing. They don’t want it to seem like an accident, or a case of bad fish.

[quote]pookie wrote:
Sloth wrote:
Are there not less detectable and quicker acting poisons? Maybe I’ve seen one too many Bond movies.

It’s just odd they target this guy so publically, with such a high profile poison. Was the guy such a threat to Putin? To risk alienation from western powers?

Even if Putin is slouching towards a total iron fisted policy, it seems odd he would have this guy rubbed out, in this way.

I think the whole idea is to leave little doubt of who did the killing. They don’t want it to seem like an accident, or a case of bad fish.
[/quote]

I don’t know man. That’s such a counter-productive move if you’re right. Seems like a real stumbling block for Putin and diplomatic efforts he may undertake with the west. Yeah, I see how it might send a message to “noncooperative” individuals, but it could turn into a foriegn relations nightmare for him.

Even for a leader capable of murder, the benefits don’t seem worth the risks. Wouldn’t be to me. I’d just have the guy ‘stumble’ in front of train, or something. The way it was done has the world looking right at Putin. And the next time he wants something from Europe, let’s say, it could be a serious issue for him.

Not saying he didn’t have something do with it. Just seems odd how it was done. Might as well have left a note, “From Russia, with love.”

Turns out I might have to revise my views on polonium 210 being only accessible to government-type agencies.

You can apparently order the stuff on the web: http://www.informationweek.com/internet/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=196513797

It’s the type of polonium that’s not dangerous radioactively, but deadly if swallowed. Seems to fit the bill.

Maybe Putin really has nothing to do with it… Great way to make him look guilty though.

[quote]Sloth wrote:

I don’t know man. That’s such a counter-productive move if you’re right. Seems like a real stumbling block for Putin and diplomatic efforts he may undertake with the west. Yeah, I see how it might send a message to “noncooperative” individuals, but it could turn into a foriegn relations nightmare for him.

Even for a leader capable of murder, the benefits don’t seem worth the risks. Wouldn’t be to me. I’d just have the guy ‘stumble’ in front of train, or something. The way it was done has the world looking right at Putin. And the next time he wants something from Europe, let’s say, it could be a serious issue for him.

Not saying he didn’t have something do with it. Just seems odd how it was done. Might as well have left a note, “From Russia, with love.”
[/quote]

If Putin was in a position of weakness then you might have a point. That just isn’t the case though. Putin dictates Europe’s energy policy, has immense sway over world energy markets and retains substantial power within its sphere.

The Russians have been getting bolder throughout their foreign policy over the last couple years precisely because it is in such a position of strength.