T Nation

Dealing with Broscience Guys


#1

There are plenty of older, and usually bigger/stronger dudes in my gym, that preach broscience to me. Now, i appreciate their effort to help me, but they actually expect me to follow their advice which is complete broscience and bullshit. How should i deal with them without going into argument or hurting relationships? (don't want to have constant negative atmosphere when i go to workout)


#2

Maybe the stuff that you believe is broscience. We need examples of what they told you.


#3

Put in headphones and go about your workout.

If they tell you you’re doing something wrong, tell them you’re getting results with what you’re doing but you’ll keep their advice in mind when you change routines.


#4

Thank them for the advice and then continue to do your own thing.


#5

[quote]creatinejunkie wrote:
There are plenty of older, and usually bigger/stronger dudes in my gym[/quote]
Honestly, based on your post history, I think your best bet is to politely ask to train with these guys and do whatever they say. You do not know more than them. They’re bigger, stronger, and more experienced than you. What they’re doing might be textbook-approved, but it works.

Relevant question: What do you currently weigh?


#6

[quote]creatinejunkie wrote:
There are plenty of older, and usually bigger/stronger dudes in my gym, that preach broscience to me. Now, i appreciate their effort to help me, but they actually expect me to follow their advice which is complete broscience and bullshit. How should i deal with them without going into argument or hurting relationships? (don’t want to have constant negative atmosphere when i go to workout)[/quote]

What is the advice they are giving out of curiosity??


#7

Guy or girl, if you on a regular basis come into a gym and bench press, military press, squat, and deadlift with good form and heavy, you could never step foot towards a dumbbell, machine, or treadmill and nobody would probably ever say a word to you, so if you aren’t doing those four things then you obviously need advice and help.

I went to a gym where a skinny nerdy looking guy would come in everyday in chucks and do one of those four things with great form and with weights that for him were heavy and required low reps, I had more respect for him then any other jacked up bro getting a pump from isolation exercises and test boosters.


#8

I like to give the gonads a gentle squeeze. Usually shuts people up.


#9

You could always get stronger than them. That’ll shut them up.


#10

Sounds like the broscience is working for them. They may not know they ‘why’ or ‘how’, but you can’t argue with results.


#11

[quote]SuperVillian wrote:
Guy or girl, if you on a regular basis come into a gym and bench press, military press, squat, and deadlift with good form and heavy, you could never step foot towards a dumbbell, machine, or treadmill and nobody would probably ever say a word to you, so if you aren’t doing those four things then you obviously need advice and help.

I went to a gym where a skinny nerdy looking guy would come in everyday in chucks and do one of those four things with great form and with weights that for him were heavy and required low reps, I had more respect for him then any other jacked up bro getting a pump from isolation exercises and test boosters. [/quote]

Never thought about that, but I definitely agree. I’ve seen people give that much advice to someone who looks like or is working out even remotely correct.


#12

[quote]Chris Colucci wrote:

[quote]creatinejunkie wrote:
There are plenty of older, and usually bigger/stronger dudes in my gym[/quote]
Honestly, based on your post history, I think your best bet is to politely ask to train with these guys and do whatever they say. You do not know more than them. They’re bigger, stronger, and more experienced than you. What they’re doing might be textbook-approved, but it works.

Relevant question: What do you currently weigh?[/quote]
Lol, dude you’re the best


#13

[quote]creatinejunkie wrote:
I want to start this routine, but few questions are bugging me:

  1. if i continue to eat big, will i gain muscle with this routine?
  2. if yes, will i gain muscle efficiently? for example, compared to 5x5, or classic bodybuilding routines (3x10; 4x8; etc.)
  3. routine suggests adding 2 lbs on upper body lifts every month, but smallest weight in my gym is 2.5 kg (about 5.5 lbs). how to deal with this problem?
  4. isn’t adding 2-5 lbs every month is too small gains? i’m young lifter, i think i could do more than that[/quote]
    I think you should listen to their broscience.

#14

[quote]csulli wrote:

[quote]creatinejunkie wrote:
I want to start this routine, but few questions are bugging me:

  1. if i continue to eat big, will i gain muscle with this routine?
  2. if yes, will i gain muscle efficiently? for example, compared to 5x5, or classic bodybuilding routines (3x10; 4x8; etc.)
  3. routine suggests adding 2 lbs on upper body lifts every month, but smallest weight in my gym is 2.5 kg (about 5.5 lbs). how to deal with this problem?
  4. isn’t adding 2-5 lbs every month is too small gains? i’m young lifter, i think i could do more than that[/quote]
    I think you should listen to their broscience.[/quote]

Where did you get that from?

Anyhow, I can answer 3. because I posted more or less the same question on these here forums.

You get this itsy bitsy tiny plates which are kind of like , produced and sold by evil, soul crushing capitalists and then you inch your way up there.

One tiny plate at a time.


#15

As funny as the term “broscience” may sometimes be, plenty of bodybuilders got great results and built world class physiques long before the internet allowed anyone with a degree to have a youtube channel, or pop onto Pubmed and browse studies.

If these gym guys have decent physiques, then they must have stumbled upon at least some basic things that work. If, in addition, your own progress hasn;'t been too good,… maybe pay attention and at least give their suggestions a try.

I’m curious what constitutes “broscience” these days.

S


#16

[quote]The Mighty Stu wrote:

I’m curious what constitutes “broscience” these days.

S[/quote]

Offline

On a related note, I had an older guy come up to me between bench sets to suggest the bench machine because it’s more stable. He looked alright for a guy in his 60’s, but still DYEL status (my gym has a lot of older guys that just do treadmill and upper body work… not that I’m not DYEL). I acknowledged that the machine was probably easier on the joints and that I will give it a try some time.

There is another masters level BBer (took first in a few local comps) that is pretty cool and says to come to him if I ever need advice. I’ve thought about working with him more just to learn some things, but I’ve held off for 2 reasons 1)Different goals (I’m focused more on strength/rehab now) and 2)Completely different body types (I’m a tall fatty, he’s a short former skinny guy)… I might hit him up, though.


#17

My story?

Deep squats.

For my first two years at my gym doing 5/3/1, everyone took it for fact that I would bust my knees squatting full depth. These are guys who can bench 300+ lbs, definitely some serious lifters. The extra 6" ROM became a legitimate point of contention with one of the guys who could bench 400+ lbs.

Making it a little more complicated, there were a couple equally jacked guys who actually gave me props for said full squats.

Fast forward to now, one guy who can bench 315 (def more than his max squat) comes up to me and tells me about his crazy new recent discovery that (his words) “you have to go all the way down on squats to get that pump.” I nod and get back to my regular work.

Bottom line multiple jacked dudes gave me different (sometimes conflicting) advice on lifting. But nobody does that anymore - now that I’ve hit 2/3/4 b/s/d and still moving forward, it’s pretty obvious I’m getting the hang of things. (please don’t interpret as bragging…)

Anyways OP as for how to respond? Depends. If someone jacked invites you to do 300 pushups with them post workout for a pump, it won’t hurt. Not as much as knowing that you’re alienating a potential bro. If someone tries to engage you and get technical with the details of your workout and you’re REALLY not in the mood (better be making actual progress) just keep it vague - “I’m going to get bigger and stronger by lifting heavy and hitting some assistance.” But likely that won’t happen. Chances are they just care for your safety, they see their former selves within you, they see potential, and they don’t want to let you just be some nerdy punk who looks/performs the same every year. The faster you grow, the sooner you can get some gym propz.

Omar Isuf said, “Broscience is just something that you don’t agree with.”


#18

[quote]The Mighty Stu wrote:
As funny as the term “broscience” may sometimes be, plenty of bodybuilders got great results and built world class physiques long before the internet allowed anyone with a degree to have a youtube channel, or pop onto Pubmed and browse studies.

If these gym guys have decent physiques, then they must have stumbled upon at least some basic things that work. If, in addition, your own progress hasn;'t been too good,… maybe pay attention and at least give their suggestions a try.

I’m curious what constitutes “broscience” these days.

S[/quote]

I had a group of three “lifters” next to me in a 24 Hour fitness in Dallas trying to decide if this was bulk week or cut week.

And then they had a discussion that to get really big arms was that you needed to punch your biceps a lot. When the bruising went away, the arm would still be big.

Seriously, this happened.


#19

I hate it when people bigger, stronger, and more experienced than me try to give me advice.


#20

^ x2.

Especially when they’re weak and train for non-functional hypertrophy… I even had to open a jar of peanut butter for one of them.